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post #271 of 1951
If Abrams does Star Wars, there will be a hardcore geek Civil war laugh.gif. His Star Trek wasn't bad though, I enjoyed it.
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The space between her ears is greater than the space between her legs....
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#TAN #LOT


The space between her ears is greater than the space between her legs....
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post #272 of 1951

I wasn't even arguing for Affleck, I have no desire to see him near Star Wars at all. Not leaving Boston and starring in them are my biggest criticism of his movies. Argo was a step in the right direction but now he's going back to Boston. 

post #273 of 1951
I guess with the announcement, all the opinions on what needs to be done are starting to pour out.

http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/10-things-j-j-abrams-needs-to-do-with-star-wars-episode-vii-to-make-it-great-20130125


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Quote:
10 Things J.J. Abrams Needs To Do With 'Star Wars: Episode VII' To Make It Great





So the question that's been dominating the movie world for the past few months has finally been answered. After lots of rumors and speculation, with Steven Spielberg, David Fincher, Jon Favreau, Guillermo Del Toro, Matthew Vaughn and Colin Trevorrow among the many names linked to the project, firm news has emerged that J.J. Abrams, creator of TV shows "Felicity," "Lost," "Alias" and "Fringe," among others, and director of blockbusters "Mission Impossible III," "Star Trek," "Super 8" and the upcoming "Star Trek Into Darkness," has been hired to direct "Star Wars Episode VII," the continuation of George Lucas' classic sci-fi saga.

It's the biggest news since, well, it was announced that Disney had bought Lucasfilm and were planning new films in the franchise, and yet fan reaction has been decidedly mixed. You would assume that the news that the man behind some of the most popular pop culture phenomena of the 21st century is making a new "Star Wars" film written by the guy who did "Toy Story 3" would be greeted by geeks dancing in the streets like they just blew up the second Death Star. And while some are indeed rejoicing, others are concerned that Abrams has already rebooted "Star Trek," and they simply want a different sensibility behind the camera.

Anyway, we think he's as good a pick for the job as any, and we've already run down five of the qualities we think he'll bring to the new movie (for better or worse). But with more expectations than any film in the works over the next few years, there's still all kinds of pitfalls. So as Abrams, screenwriter Michael Arndt and producer Kathleen Kennedy get to work, we've suggested ten things that they need to bear in mind when making "Episode VII," in order to make it live up to the dreams of "Star Wars" fanatics and agnostics alike. Let us know what you'd like to see from Abrams' "Star Wars" in the comments section below.

1. Tell self-contained stories
In a recent Q&A, Joss Whedon discussed how the original "Star Wars" remains his favorite of the series, in spite of "The Empire Strikes Back" being a better film, because it's a contained story, while "The Empire Strikes Back" is ultimately an "episode" thanks to its cliffhanger ending. Regardless of your feelings on either, multi-part storytelling is becoming an increasingly prevalent, and toxic, trend in franchise movies (see "The Hobbit," the "Twilight" movies and all the franchises splitting their final installment into two). It's possible to have a movie trilogy and still tell distinct and satisfying stories (Christopher Nolan and Marvel -- with the exception of "Iron Man 2" -- have mostly managed it), and despite his TV pedigree, Abrams has done that as well, at least so far. "Star Trek" didn't feel like a pilot for a new TV series, which was always the risk, and his "Mission: Impossible III" was self-contained too. We don't mind if the new trilogy adds up to one big macro-plot, as previous "Star Wars" films did, but Abrams and screenwriter Michael Arndt should make sure there's enough story to split between them, and ideally try to give each film its own individual beginning, middle and end, rather than making them parts of a whole.

2. Remember it's for kids, not just for existing fans
In George Lucas' defense, he always insisted while making the prequels that he was making movies for the young demographic that made "Star Wars" such a phenomenon in the 1970s. The problem was, the proof wasn't in the pudding, and plots about trade embargoes and Senate votes demonstrated how far Lucas had lost his touch. And in the post "The Dark Knight" world, the risk of a joylessly gritty franchise movie is greater than ever. "The Empire Strikes Back" isn't terrific because it's the darkest of the series, it's terrific because it has the best script of the series. And Abrams would do well to remember that as much as the aging fanbase of the original films will be flocking to cinemas, it's also a chance to make a new generation of kids fall in love with the property in the way that many of us did when we were still in short trousers. Let's not forget that the original films were essentially fairy tales, one of the things that lent them the mythic appeal that's made it so indelible. We're not saying dumb it down, but try and recapture that intangible magic that made the first trio of films so memorable (a tall order indeed).

3. Ignore his inner fanboy
Abrams said, when initially asked if he'd be interested in directing the sequel: "Look, 'Star Wars' is one of my favorite movies of all time. I frankly feel that – I almost feel that, in a weird way, the opportunity for whomever it is to direct that movie, it comes with the burden of being that kind of iconic movie and series. I was never a big 'Star Trek' fan growing up, so for me, working on 'Star Trek' didn’t have any of that, you know, almost fatal sacrilege."
And that's the risk here, that Abrams, having taken on his favorite series, becomes a slave both to his own inner fanboy, and to the hundreds of thousands of voices of other fans. Abrams needs to not treat the material like it's sacred, and approach it like he did 'Trek,' or "Mission: Impossible," or any other property. This isn't to say that his fandom can't be a force for good -- Joss Whedon demonstrated last year that having someone who knows the characters backwards can benefit a big adaptation. But the flipside of that coin is Andrew Stanton and "John Carter," who couldn't see the forest for the trees thanks to his blind love of Edgar Rice Burroughs' character. Fan service -- endless cameos or nods to the original trilogy -- might make a few happy, but it can also prove to be indulgent, and alienating for newcomers. Abrams has a big train set to play with, and should approach the new film as if it was the first ever "Star Wars" film, not the seventh.

4. Make sure it's funny
One of the things that made "Star Trek" and the Abrams-produced "Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Protocol" among the most enjoyable blockbusters of the last decade or so is the way that they were consistently funny, without losing the stakes. This sense of fun is something that's sometimes lacking from blockbusters these days, as we've discussed before, and that was certainly true for the "Star Wars" prequels. While it's a few years since we saw them, we're struggling to remember any genuinely funny moments from the films (Ewan McGregor's these-are-not-the-droids-you're-looking-for probably comes closest), and the tone was generally a portentous one, without the 1930s-serial feel that made the original trilogy so much fun. In part, this was due to the absence of a Han Solo-type rogue, who could roll his eyes and make fun of the characters. Abrams doesn't need to replicate that sort of character (though as we discussed, they may make an appearance anyway), but keeping a lightness of tone to the thing seems pretty essential to us. He managed it with "Star Trek" and "Super 8," so there's no reason to think he couldn't do it here.

5. Embrace the diversity of the universe
Say what you like about the quality of the films, but the great advantage of "Star Wars" is that it has an almost endless sandbox in which to play around in. Lucas set up an impressive diversity of planets to visit (even in the prequels, there's some solid world-building going on), and while the tempatation to return to Tatooine, we'd like to see Abrams go to new places. Check in on old locations if you can find a new spin on them, but we don't want a "Hobbit" scenario, whereby the characters seem to be wandering around the same woods and mountains we've already seen. Arndt's script could go anywhere, so let's go somewhere new. And let's go with different kinds of people too. The prequels suffered because we had too many of the same kind of characters we'd already seen (noble Jedi master, upstart orphan, princess), but the various spin-off books and games have demonstrated that other kinds of characters can carry these stories. So let's mix up the protagonists a bit. Indeed, while the shadow of Jar-Jar Binks might hang a little heavy, motion-capture advances means that these leading characters don't even have to be human...

6. Be weird
For all his success, Abrams is not a blindingly original creator of material. His strength comes in giving new twists -- sometimes fairly out there ones -- to established genres. "Alias" was a spy thriller with sci-fi tinges. "Lost" was "Gilligan's Island" by way of "Twin Peaks," with conspiracy, mystery and an ancient battle of good vs. evil thrown in. "Fringe" was "The X-Files," but with the weirdness turned up to eleven (and a more satisfying macro-plot and emotional backbone than Mulder & Scully ever had). "Star Trek" took the classic series and added a time-travel twist. Indeed, Abrams' greatest failures ("Undercovers," "Six Degrees," "Morning Glory") have tended to come when he leans towards the conventional. And let's not forget that, while we've been inured to it over 35 years, "Star Wars" must have seemed pretty weird to begin with. Space knights fighting with laser swords and telepathic powers? A weird frog-goblin thing that speaks in messed-up syntax? A camp robot butler? The temptation would be to play it safe, but the film will be far more interesting if Abrams lets his freak flag fly to a certain degree, and throw a few surprises into the mix. Speaking of...

7. Keep a sense of mystery
Abrams has always played things close to his chest, valuing his famous "mystery box", which has allowed projects to brew quietly, leading to surprise annoucement teasers for "Cloverfield" and "Super 8" (and the same secrecy is being with "Star Trek Into Darkness" with details kept firmy under wraps). Abrams even gave some insight into why this is recently, saying :"I will sit in a meeting before a movie with 80-some people, heads of departments, and literally say that all I ask is that we preserve the experience for the viewer. Every choice we make, every costume fitting, every pad of makeup, every set that’s built — all that stuff becomes less magical if it’s discussed and revealed and pictures are posted online. I just want to make sure that when somebody sees something in a movie they didn’t watch a 60-minute behind-the-scenethat came out two months before. We just say up front that all the work we’re doing is about making this a special experience for the viewer; let’s preserve that as long as we can."
It's a refreshing approach, albeit frustrating for the I-want-it-now internet generation, and we'd love for Abrams to keep it up with his "Star Wars." Let's face it, it's going to have queues around the block whatever happens, so why not tread softly with the images, clips and spoilers. It'll only lead to more feverish speculation, but it should also mean that, unlike with the prequels, we won't know everything about the films going in. Hopefully, if this approach is taken, it'll also get rid of the midichlorians-aided demystification that came with the prequels. Of course that will mean he'll have to...

8. Don't cast veterans from the Bad Robot stable
Thanks to "Star Trek" (with the cast of rising stars and familiar names, carrying the movie even when the script failed it; they're about 60% of the reason that the film works), Abrams has form on this front, and the studio are likely to let him go with whoever he wants -- they're not going to want to put Tom Cruise or Johnny Depp in it anyway, they're spending enough money as it is. But just as Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher and Harrison Ford were essentially unknowns back in the day, the key new roles should be taken by people with few existing associations, and that goes for actors that the director has worked with before. He can get away with casting Abrams-verse veterans like Keri Russell or Josh Holloway in small roles in a "Mission: Impossible" movie, but their presence here, for the most part, would only prove distracting. Want to give Greg Grunberg a cameo as the voice of a stormtrooper? We suppose that's just about ok. But much as we love him, seeing Simon Pegg as a wisecracking pilot is going to break the spell, when we should be getting absorbed back into the universe. There may be some exceptions to this here and there -- we can see "Fringe" actor John Noble working in a role, perhaps, partly because he's a chameleon, and partly because no one watched "Fringe," so he doesn't have the same cultural association as, say, Bradley Cooper or Hurley from "Lost." But for the most part, Abrams should seek out some new talent when the time to cast up arrives.

9. Stand up to Disney
One of the best things about the hiring of Abrams is that he's already a golden boy, one of a handful of filmmakers around who can do pretty much anything he wants. The risk was always that the studio would hire a workman, who could be pushed around to make the blandest and most profitable film possible. Abrams has an enormous amount of cache in and of himself, and that'll hopefully buy him a lot of creative leeway. He's already flexed his muscles on this front, with "Star Trek Into Darkness," forcing Paramount to push the film back a year so he could get the script right. It was a disaster for the studio in the short-term. They were left without a summer blockbuster, and went months without releasing a film (thanks to pushing back both "G.I. Joe: Retaliation" and "World War Z" as well), but fingers crossed, it benefited the film, and in turn will likely help Paramount out in the long-run. Now that he's at Disney, we hope he keeps it up. Whehter it's Arndt's script, casting, story, marketing, whatever -- they wanted Abrams, and so now, he should get to do it his way. As for George Lucas, who's indicated he wants to take a back seat on the film, but may yet change his mind, Abrams should of course listen respectfully to the franchise's creator, but not be afraid to ignore him if Lucas' storytelling instincts haven't improved since the last three films in the series.

10. Shoot it in IMAX
That said, there's one thing that Abrams probably won't fight the studio on, and that's making the film in 3D. Given the studio's love of the format (they've had giant billion-dollar hits in three dimensions with "Alice in Wonderland," "Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides," "The Avengers" and "Toy Story 3"), and the general economic benefits (plus the in-process conversions of the previous films), Disney are going to want the film to be released in 3D. And Abrams is likely to acquiesce, given that he's already done so on "Star Trek Into Darkness," and has been won round, saying recently: "The studio said, 'You have to make it in 3D if you're going to make it, for economic reasons. But my feeling was I didn't like 3D. I approached it very cynically. And the fact is that we've been using techniques that haven't been used before in 3D. They've figured out things. They've made enough movies now with this new process that they can understand ways to eliminate some of these problems. Things like breaking shots into zones, 3D zones, using multiple virtual cameras. A lot of this has made me a believer, whereas before I was really against it…"
But what he could do, at least, is throw us a bone and add a format that we're genuinely excited about. After "Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Protocol," which Abrams produced, shot multiple sequences in IMAX to spectacular effect, Abrams has done the same with "Star Trek Into Darkness," so it's surely not too much to hope for that we get some of his "Star Wars" in giant mega-screen vision too? Christopher Nolan and 'Ghost Protocol' have shown both the format's potential for both spectacle and increased box office revenue, and we'd be lying if the idea of IMAX-ed "Star Wars" didn't make us a little giddy. Make it happen, guys.

P.S. The original "Star Wars" was only a touch over two hours, so let's try to keep it closer to that than the 150-minute mark.
post #274 of 1951
Damn I really hate 3D movies. Didn't even think about that.
post #275 of 1951
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Charles View Post

Quote:
J.J. Abrams broke the Internet in half on Thursday (January 24) with the announcement that he's directing "Star Wars: Episode VII" for Walt Disney and Lucasfilm. The filmmaker already has two "Star Trek" films under his belt, and now he'll boldly go where no man has ever gone before: directing films set in both the "Trek" and "Wars" universes.

Whether or not you support the hiring of Abrams is irrelevant to our purposes right now. With the director in place, it's now time to start thinking about what Abrams' "Star Wars" will look like. Based on his history as a filmmaker and a television pioneer, here are five things we can expect to see in Abrams' first voyage to that galaxy far, far away:

Expect an incredible female lead. What do Keri Russell, Jennifer Garner and Evangeline Lilly all have in common? Each one of these strong, alluring actresses got their big breaks from Mr. Abrams. Among his many talents, Abrams has a keen eye for discovering rising stars, especially when it comes to his leading women. Whoever lands the heroine role in "Star Wars: Episode VII" is going to be someone to watch for years and years to come.

'Star Wars' And J.J. Abrams: Five Burning Questions

Expect the score to get "Lost." Before you roast us, just know that nothing would make us happier than to see John Williams' return ... nothing, short of Michael Giacchino landing the job instead. The Oscar-winning "Up" composer is also a friend and frequent collaborator of Abrams', with mutual credits including "Star Trek," "Super 8" and "Lost." Giacchino is easily one of the most talented composers working today, and his reunion with Abrams on a "Star Wars" film is only as inevitable as it is welcome.

Expect [insert obligatory lens flare joke here]. The man loves his lens flares, and you're going to see them pop up in the new "Star Wars" movie. Love the technique or hate it, it's time to make your peace with it — lens flares in "Star Wars" is a thing that's going to happen.

Expect Greg Grunberg. The "Heroes" actor is a lifelong friend of Abrams, and has appeared in every single one of the filmmaker's projects, in a cameo capacity at the very least. The same will be true for the next "Star Wars" movie: there is a part for Grunberg, minor or major, no two ways about it.


http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1700783/jj-abrams-star-wars-episode-vii-look.jhtml

Posted this in the other thread mean.gif
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post #276 of 1951
The latest news.

http://www.slashfilm.com/rumor-the-first-stand-alone-star-wars-film-will-center-on-yoda/

Quote:
Rumor: The First Stand-Alone ‘Star Wars’ Film Will Center on Yoda
Posted on Monday, February 4th, 2013 by Russ Fischer


Over the years there has been no shortage of speculation about what characters might end up being the center of a Star Wars film that focused on the history of one character, rather than the big ensemble. Boba Fett was always a fan-favorite choice, before the prequels took some of the air out of the character’s sails. As of a year ago, Joe Johnston still wanted to make a movie oriented around everyone’s favorite helmeted bounty hunter.

Robert Rodriguez has expressed his own interest in a Han Solo movie, and there is a grand list of characters that could be explored in films with an individual focus. Now we hear more news that Kathleen Kennedy and LucasFilm are definitely prepping a solo film or two, and that the first will center on Yoda. Could this be what Lawrence Kasdan is writing?

AICN says “The first Stand Alone film is going to center upon YODA. At this stage specifics are sparse, but Kathleen Kennedy is putting together a STAR WARS slate.” Harry writes the piece, but doesn’t have details other than that exclamation. Will this be Yoda as seen in the original trilogy, or the prequels, or in some other point in his life?

Harry also teases the idea of a Jabba the Hut story — and that would be interesting, as there’s a Han Solo-ish film to be made in which Jabba comes to power, perhaps — but there’s nothing big to rely on there, either.

We’ve heard that the scripts by Simon Kinberg and Lawrence Kasdan, originally thought to be for additional core Star Wars episodes, could be for spin-off films featuring side characters, and there’s a lot of talk about a great deal of consideration being given to expansions of the core Star Wars story.

As Kasdan wrote The Empire Strikes Back, and so was one of the primary creators of Yoda, his script naturally comes to mind as a possible confirmation of this story. But we don’t have that piece of the puzzle yet.

There’s a lot of room for denial here, and the truth is that we might have to wait another year or two to really start to get a bigger view of the LucasFilm plans. The company knows they’ve got something big, and is doing a good job of managing interest in Star Wars at this point. We also know that merchandise is always going to be a part of any plans for the Lucas universe, and a Yoda film — complete with a collection of other cute but tough alien characters — could be a bonanza in that department.

That said, Yoda is a supporting character. He shines in small appearances, but the idea of a movie full of Yoda-speak isn’t the most appealing. That’s the problem with many Star Wars characters. They can be wonderful in their particular roles, which leave audiences wanting more. As soon as the focus collapses to feature just that one person, however, they might not shine so brightly. Han Solo would likely be an exception, and Yoda might, with a very creative script.

We’re early in the news cycle on this one, and so don’t expect to hear a big confirmation from LucasFilm just yet.

(There was also that rumored Zack Snyder standalone movie that would be a Seven Samurai-inspired Star Wars tale… and I can see Yoda being pretty great as a main character in a film that was loosely based on Kurosawa’s classic. LucasFilm and Snyder quickly denied that film, but it’s the one idea that really sounds good here. What if young Yoda played the rogueish Toshiro Mifune role, and the film portrayed his own ascent to zen/Jedi mastery?)
post #277 of 1951
Thread Starter 
Even tho they keep denying each rumor, at some point it becomes clear they are in fact going to start working in the solo projects at the same time as the main projects. (no pun intended)

I don't see a Jabba one tho. First of all, he don't speak English, we ain't tryna read a full subtitled movie about a fat slug that sits in a hoversled all movie long. That's pointless.

A Han project, Fett project, Bane project, Karrde project smokin.gif a Plageius project, Sith army project, X-Wing project, those you could work with. Yoda's a stretch to me, but I get why they think he could be great. I don't agree, But I get why they love him so much. He was hugely popular in the OG sequels, even tho I never liked dude. I was never a big Yoda fan. Attack of the Clones only cemented my feelings, even if Sith did help make him at least a little better.


I'd give just about anything for a solo Vader project to fill in the missing 18 years, and have him truly hunt down and destroy Jedi like we were told. I'd sell an arm for that, or donate a kidney or somethin. laugh.gif
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post #278 of 1951
^ i think doing a vader one will outshine everything others though. the vader story will be too badass cuz he pretty much went YOLO
post #279 of 1951
Thread Starter 
That's really the idea tho, Vader spin off would NEED to outshine all others.

Vader is and was supposed to be one of THEE most feared characters in the Star Wars universe. But when he completed his prequel trilogy, he made Anakin look like a damn *****.

If you step back, Vader died in his early to mid 40's. indifferent.gif And he was "Vader" for 20 of those years or so. The **** is that about?

Palpatine lived for decade after decade as some evil dude planning and plotting, killing his master, etc. Vader was defeated by the only true Jedi he faced that wasn't 900 years old like Dooku. mean.gif

The more story Lucas told, the weaker Vader got. Sad little momma's boy, cryin cuz he lost his girl. Darth ******g Vader. indifferent.gif


What needs to happen is us see Vader in his prime, for 20 years chasin down Jedi in hiding, and whipping their ***** by hisself. It's a must.


Eat my *** Lucas for what you did to Vader.
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post #280 of 1951
Thread Starter 
CONFIRMED. pimp.gif

Quote:
Walt Disney Pictures Chairman and CEO Bob Iger has confirmed rumors that the studio is looking at a series of Star Wars films that will see release independent of the new trilogy and that will focus on specific characters from the overall Star Wars universe.

"There has been speculation about some stand-alone films that are in development," Iger tells CNBC. "I can confirm to you today that, in fact, we are working on a few stand-alone films. Larry Kasdan and Simon Kinberg are both working on films derived from great 'Star Wars' characters that are not part of the overall saga. We still plan to make Episodes 7, 8, and 9, roughly over a six-year period of time, starting in 2015. There are going to be a few other films released in that time, too."

Iger goes on to say that Kasdan and Kingberg are serving in a consulting capacity on J.J. Abrams' Star Wars: Episode VII with Michael Arndt supplying the screenplay. Both writers are simultaneously working on new, as of yet unknown, Star Wars films.

The news arrives on the heels of yesterday's rumor that claimed the first such film would follow the adventures of Yoda. While that rumor has not been confirmed, Iger's comments suggest some truth to the reports.


My lifelong dream of this stuff happenin is finally coming true. I never thought George would sell. Thank you God he did. laugh.gif
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post #281 of 1951
But midichlorians.
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post #282 of 1951
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrONegative View Post

But midichlorians.
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post #283 of 1951
yoda spin off sounds good. lol watch them make another ewok spinoff laugh.gif

they can always do an r2d2 cp30 spin off movie series kind of like the star wars 80's cartoon they did...

also chewbacca and the wookies

and ofcourse the old knights of the republic...
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post #284 of 1951
post #285 of 1951
Quote:
Originally Posted by CP1708 View Post

That's really the idea tho, Vader spin off would NEED to outshine all others.

Vader is and was supposed to be one of THEE most feared characters in the Star Wars universe. But when he completed his prequel trilogy, he made Anakin look like a damn *****.

If you step back, Vader died in his early to mid 40's. indifferent.gif And he was "Vader" for 20 of those years or so. The **** is that about?

Palpatine lived for decade after decade as some evil dude planning and plotting, killing his master, etc. Vader was defeated by the only true Jedi he faced that wasn't 900 years old like Dooku. mean.gif

The more story Lucas told, the weaker Vader got. Sad little momma's boy, cryin cuz he lost his girl. Darth ******g Vader. indifferent.gif


What needs to happen is us see Vader in his prime, for 20 years chasin down Jedi in hiding, and whipping their ***** by hisself. It's a must.


Eat my *** Lucas for what you did to Vader.

nthat.gif all of this roll.gif

 

CP's love for Star Wars is second to none laugh.gif

post #286 of 1951
Yo!!!!!!!!

Two More ‘Star Wars’ Spin-Offs Revealed: Young Han Solo And Boba Fett....


http://www.slashfilm.com/two-more-star-wars-spin-offs-revealed-young-han-solo-and-boba-fett/


Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Two More ‘Star Wars’ Spin-Offs Revealed: Young Han Solo And Boba Fett
Posted on Wednesday, February 6th, 2013 by Germain Lussier


CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 90

When Disney officially announced they would be making Star Wars spin-off movies between the new, official episodes, some fans intensified the process of fantasizing about two characters: Han Solo and Boba Fett. According to Entertainment Weekly, films spotlighting those fan-favorites are in the works.

While the development is still in its earliest stages, films are being discussed which would be based on the adventures of a young Han Solo, set between Episode III: Revenge of the Sith and Episode IV: A New Hope, and the actions of Boba Fett, set either between Episode IV: A New Hope and Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back or between Empire and Return of the Jedi.

Entertainment Weekly broke the story and was very decisive in saying both these projects are being developed but also “it’s still very early in the process and, well, the deal could always be altered further.” Neither Disney nor LucasFilm would comment.

But what about that Yoda movie we heard about earlier this week?


There will be many spin-offs. I’m not negating the Yoda report at all. @edouglasww

— Anthony Breznican (@Breznican) February 6, 2013

Disney CEO Bob Iger never specifically said how many spin-off films were being discussed in his official announcement, just that Lawrence Kasdan and Simon Kinberg were working on two of them:

I can confirm to you today that in fact we are working on a few standalone films, Larry Kasdan and Simon Kinberg are both working on films derived from great Star Wars characters that are not part of the overall saga. We still plan to make Star Wars 7, 8, and 9 roughly over a six-year period of time, starting in 2015. But there are going to be a few other films released in that period, too.

EW also reports by setting these films in the frame work of the first two trilogies, characters such as Darth Vader and Jabba the Hutt could be brought back and seen in their primes once again.

The origins of Han Solo and Boba Fett (though we’ve already seen some of his history) would certainly qualify as films fans would drool over. In the case of Solo alone, the events that could be dramatized are endless: his feud with Jabba, winning the Millennium Falcon, the Kessel Run, etc. Of course, being as he’d be younger, you’d have to recast him and those are some mighty huge shoes to fill. Boba Fett is less difficut as almost any actor could jump in that armor; maybe even Jeremy Bulloch or Daniel Logan, the two actors who portrayed him in the Original and Prequel trilogies.

A recent book, Scoundrels by Timothy Zahn, told a Han Solo tale from the aforementioned time period. EW, however, said this book would not be used as a basis for the film. There was also no word if Joe Johnston, who designed the Boba Fett armor and has been vocal about wanting to make a Fett movie, was involved.

Besides casting, here’s the big question: Are these stories we want to see told? Is it better for them to be imaginary and live between the lines or do we want to see where Boba Fett was before being eaten by the Sarlacc Pitt?
post #287 of 1951
Will we see how Boba deals with his dads?
"You are like the Michael Jordan of being a sonofa*****"
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post #288 of 1951
Thread Starter 
Boba Fett stand alone movie. pimp.gif

Han Solo stand alone movie. pimp.gif



The Vault is OPEN. happy.gif


I said it when the deal was announced, this has nothing to do with 7-8-9, this is going to be about the 50 other movies that can get made now. And they will never stop, never run dry, never end. There can be a new Star Wars film every single year for the next 30 years, EASY. The material that's out there is not unlike comic books for the comic movies, they can combine story lines and alter things and still have material to last decades.

My Blu Ray collection boutta be on swole!!!

I miduswell set up direct deposit into Disney's accounts now. ******* own me. mean.gif
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post #289 of 1951
Disney is currently @ $54.59 a share... nerd.gif
post #290 of 1951
R.I.P. Stuart Freeborn. In addition to being make-up supervisor on the original Star Wars trilogy (created the looks for Chewbacca, Yoda, and Jabba the Hutt.), he also worked on such films like Victoria The Great, The Thief Of Bahgdad, The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp, and Oliver Twist (David Lean’s). He also worked on Dr. Stranglove creating Peter Sellers into 3 different characters....RIP....


post #291 of 1951
Darth Vader Vs Boba Fett is what I am waiting on!

smokin.gif
post #292 of 1951
I might die if they release a Knight Of The Old Republic series. After Episode 5 the Kotor games are the best story's in Star Wars imo.
post #293 of 1951
Quote:
Originally Posted by CP1708 View Post

My Blu Ray collection boutta be on swole!!!

You're gonna have a heart attack.

Are you on a Bayer regimen?
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post #294 of 1951
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrONegative View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by CP1708 View Post

My Blu Ray collection boutta be on swole!!!

You're gonna have a heart attack.

Are you on a Bayer regiment?

Not yet, but when the casting info starts dropping......

And then the first pictures.......

And *gasp* some teaser trailers.........


It'll move.
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post #295 of 1951

For the Star Wars fan with a sweet tooth

DEATH STAR LOLLIPOPS

 
 
post #296 of 1951
So he got to direct Star Trek and also gets to direct Star Wars. That's like nirvana for a nerd.

Reading about all the stuff they have planned has got me geeked.
post #297 of 1951
Hot off the press... Yeah-yuh...Can't wait!!!

http://www.slashfilm.com/see-lucasfilms-concept-art-of-young-han-solo/

Quote:
See Lucasfilm’s Concept Art of Young Han Solo
Posted on Wednesday, February 6th, 2013 by Peter Sciretta


Yesterday Disney CEO Bob Iger confirmed that Disney and Lucasfilm were also developing stand-alone character-centric spin-off Star Wars films in addition to the previously announced third trilogy of the Skywalker saga (Episodes VII-IV).

Earlier today it was revealed that one of the spin-off standalone movies would follow a young Han Solo, set between Episode III: Revenge of the Sith and Episode IV: A New Hope.

What would young Han Solo even look like? We might have a good idea, as Lucasfilm created concept designs of the character in the early 2000s for a brief segment that was cut from Episode III: Revenge of the Sith. Thats right, young Han Solo was originally set to appear in the last Star Wars prequel. Art, details and more after the jump.

George Lucas wanted to include a young Han Solo in Revenge of the Sith, but due to the timeline of that film, the character was only to be about ten years old. This idea made it far along in the development process. He appeared, complete with dialogue, in the Kashyyyk battle scenes of the rough draft of the screenplay. Lucasfilm even had concept art approved. Solo’s role was to be a helpful kid who helps find the elusive General Grievous’ location.

Concept artist Iain McCaig talks about his contribution which never made it into the final film, in the officially licensed Lucasfilm book The Art of Revenge of the Sith (whole page available in scanned form here):

It’s not in the script anymore, but we were told that Han Solo was on Kashyyyk and that he was being raised by Chewbacca. He’s such a persnickety guy later on – he always has to have the best of everything – so I thought it’d be great if when he was a kid, he was an absolute slob.

Solo’s one line appears in the script as follows:

HAN SOLO
I found part of a transmitter droid near the east bay… I think it’s still sending and receiving signals.

YODA
Good. Good. Track this we can back to the source. Find General Grievous, we might…

Solo and Yoda then track the signal to Utapau and locate Grievous. StarWars.com points out that this addition “slightly goes against” the extended universe backstory that “Solo saved Chewbacca from slavery while in the navy.” Solo’s brief moment was dropped some time after the first draft of the screenplay was completed. To me the moment feels like a cameo for the sake of a cameo and nothing else, so I’m glad it wasn’t used.

I’m guessing the Star Wars spin-off movie currently in development would probably feature an older Solo, in his late teens or early 20′s.


CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 90
CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 90
post #298 of 1951
Thread Starter 
Of course he wanted to have a 10 year old Han Solo, of course he did. mean.gif

I ******g hate you George Lucas. You and your little boy Darth Vader, little boy Boba Fett and little boy Han Solo fetish can go sit on a stop sign you ****** *******.

Then he has Han being "raised" by Chewie, and hanging out with Yoda. indifferent.gif
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post #299 of 1951
it's over. he did the right thing and put it in someone else's hands. just be happy you even get to see that happy.gif
post #300 of 1951

huge huge star wars fan..

 

would sit and watch the original 3 regularly as a child growing up.. my uncle had all 3 recorded on one tape and i would just sit in awe and watch all 3 back to back to back

 

 

 

 

so glad that lucas is out.. watching him butcher something so near and dear to me was not fun..

 

hopefully disney takes the 'avengers' route and hires quality people to put the films together

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