NikeTalk › NikeTalk Forums › The Lounge › General › Mulholland Drive Diner Scene: This clip is EPIC and will ruin your night....
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Mulholland Drive Diner Scene: This clip is EPIC and will ruin your night....

post #1 of 86
Thread Starter 

Mulholland Drive - Diner Scene from Stephen Wiebe on Vimeo.

 

|I Im 25 years old and when I say I have never reacted to a film as I just did.. Jus this clip of the movie is epic. The rest doesn't really make sense watching it now :\

post #2 of 86

What the hell did I just watch?

 

Why did that affect you so much?

post #3 of 86
i'm confused by this video and this thread.
"what ch'all know 'bout dem Texas boys!?!"
PSN:caliblu
Reply
"what ch'all know 'bout dem Texas boys!?!"
PSN:caliblu
Reply
post #4 of 86
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElecRelaxation View Post
 

What the hell did I just watch?

 

Why did that affect you so much?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ElecRelaxation View Post
 

What the hell did I just watch?

 

Why did that affect you so much?

Watch the entire clip dialogue all the way to the build up. If you appreciate films you'd understand :hat

post #5 of 86
Bruh...
I slapbox with Jesus, lick shots at Joseph
Reply
I slapbox with Jesus, lick shots at Joseph
Reply
post #6 of 86
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikejs210 View Post

Bruh...


I know lol 

post #7 of 86
Easily one of the worst movies I've ever seen in my life...
Genco Importing Co.
Reply
Genco Importing Co.
Reply
post #8 of 86
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILL LEGAL OPERATION View Post

Easily one of the worst movies I've ever seen in my life...


I can understand your view. It actually makes NO sense at all but as a movie buff I can appreciate the movies cinematography and the directors placement of a lot of things. I feel like with this the screen writers dropped the ball making the script make sense on screen. However this SCENE alone is one of the best I have ever seen in a thriller ever. The build up and the narrative and the dudes expressions are deep. 

post #9 of 86
That was a good scene
It got me good

I want to watch this movie now
post #10 of 86
I knew it was coming so I put my phone far away and it still got me f man I'm about to go to bed scene gave me chills smh
Willing to buy Nike air Jordan 1s 1985-20?? Sz 11-11.5 Pm
Reply
Willing to buy Nike air Jordan 1s 1985-20?? Sz 11-11.5 Pm
Reply
post #11 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILL LEGAL OPERATION View Post

Easily one of the worst movies I've ever seen in my life...

Plebeian taste detected.

Stick to Michael Bay and Kevin Smith movies kid.
Quote:
Originally Posted by donovandoesit View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ILL LEGAL OPERATION View Post

Easily one of the worst movies I've ever seen in my life...


I can understand your view. It actually makes NO sense at all but as a movie buff I can appreciate the movies cinematography and the directors placement of a lot of things. I feel like with this the screen writers dropped the ball making the script make sense on screen. However this SCENE alone is one of the best I have ever seen in a thriller ever. The build up and the narrative and the dudes expressions are deep. 

If you like Mulholland Drive, you should really check out Lost Highway. It's my favorite Lynch film and plays with many of the same themes as Mulholland Drive.

If you feel like the "screen writers" dropped the ball, I take it you haven't watched much Lynch. Mulholland Drive is pretty damn cut and dry. Most people consider it to be Lynch's masterpiece, but I would argue that it's merely a remedial version of his earlier film, Lost Highway.

Critics and the public did not respond well to Lost Highway. Most people, critics included, do not like ambiguity in their movies. They want clear cut protagonists, antagonists, beginnings middles and ends. Textbook Lynch doesn't work this way. His films are much more vague and open to interpretation, but he always leaves enough clues in there for the discerning viewer to figure out what's going on. Many people criticize Lost Highway for being too hard to follow or not making any sense. Once the "shift" happens in Mulholland Drive, it's quite easy to see whats been going on. While Lost Highway is a bit more ambiguous than Mulholland Drive, the main character Fred has a line in the movie that explains everything if you're paying attention.

The simplicity and similarities of Mulholland Drive compared to Lost Highway makes more sense if you know that Mulholland Drive was a re-worked script for an unaired TV pilot. It wasn't intended to be as complex as one of Lynch's feature films. It was intended to employ Lynchian elements, but not at the expense of viewership and ratings. Lynch put a lot of time and effort into Lost Highway, but it was too complex for the average viewer and went right over their heads. I believe that Mulholland Drive and the statements it made about Hollywood was a means for Lynch to stick it to the same people who crapped all over Lost Highway. "See, I made the same movie, toned down the weirdness and explained everything for you...now you all love it".
post #12 of 86
Dude, you can't just post that scene and expect the average NTer to respond to it logically. It means nothing without seeing the rest of the film. It's one of my Top 10 films of all time. It's incredible. But I'd never expect your average NTer to understand it, let alone that random scene.
post #13 of 86

will def check out the movie and get back to you OP

 

dont want to watch the clip and spoil anything 

pimp.gifTEAM MBENGApimp.gif

 

Thank you for calling NT tech support, can i take your order please? 

 

nerd.gifAbout Menerd.gif 

Reply

pimp.gifTEAM MBENGApimp.gif

 

Thank you for calling NT tech support, can i take your order please? 

 

nerd.gifAbout Menerd.gif 

Reply
post #14 of 86
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sea manup View Post
 

will def check out the movie and get back to you OP

 

dont want to watch the clip and spoil anything 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dankenstien88 View Post


Plebeian taste detected.

Stick to Michael Bay and Kevin Smith movies kid.
If you like Mulholland Drive, you should really check out Lost Highway. It's my favorite Lynch film and plays with many of the same themes as Mulholland Drive.

If you feel like the "screen writers" dropped the ball, I take it you haven't watched much Lynch. Mulholland Drive is pretty damn cut and dry. Most people consider it to be Lynch's masterpiece, but I would argue that it's merely a remedial version of his earlier film, Lost Highway.

Critics and the public did not respond well to Lost Highway. Most people, critics included, do not like ambiguity in their movies. They want clear cut protagonists, antagonists, beginnings middles and ends. Textbook Lynch doesn't work this way. His films are much more vague and open to interpretation, but he always leaves enough clues in there for the discerning viewer to figure out what's going on. Many people criticize Lost Highway for being too hard to follow or not making any sense. Once the "shift" happens in Mulholland Drive, it's quite easy to see whats been going on. While Lost Highway is a bit more ambiguous than Mulholland Drive, the main character Fred has a line in the movie that explains everything if you're paying attention.

The simplicity and similarities of Mulholland Drive compared to Lost Highway makes more sense if you know that Mulholland Drive was a re-worked script for an unaired TV pilot. It wasn't intended to be as complex as one of Lynch's feature films. It was intended to employ Lynchian elements, but not at the expense of viewership and ratings. Lynch put a lot of time and effort into Lost Highway, but it was too complex for the average viewer and went right over their heads. I believe that Mulholland Drive and the statements it made about Hollywood was a means for Lynch to stick it to the same people who crapped all over Lost Highway. "See, I made the same movie, toned down the weirdness and explained everything for you...now you all love it".


This

post #15 of 86
Yeah... I definitely don't get it.
post #16 of 86
Makes me want to check the film out.
post #17 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by donovandoesit View Post



Mulholland Drive - Diner Scene from Stephen Wiebe on Vimeo.

tired.gif  Im 25 years old and when I say I have never reacted to a film as I just did.. Jus this clip of the movie is epic. The rest doesn't really make sense watching it now ohwell.gif

I HATE the first guy who talks as a actor. Literally ever role he's in he's annoying
post #18 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by dankenstien88 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ILL LEGAL OPERATION View Post

Easily one of the worst movies I've ever seen in my life...

Plebeian taste detected.

Stick to Michael Bay and Kevin Smith movies kid.
Quote:
Originally Posted by donovandoesit View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ILL LEGAL OPERATION View Post

Easily one of the worst movies I've ever seen in my life...


I can understand your view. It actually makes NO sense at all but as a movie buff I can appreciate the movies cinematography and the directors placement of a lot of things. I feel like with this the screen writers dropped the ball making the script make sense on screen. However this SCENE alone is one of the best I have ever seen in a thriller ever. The build up and the narrative and the dudes expressions are deep. 

If you like Mulholland Drive, you should really check out Lost Highway. It's my favorite Lynch film and plays with many of the same themes as Mulholland Drive.

If you feel like the "screen writers" dropped the ball, I take it you haven't watched much Lynch. Mulholland Drive is pretty damn cut and dry. Most people consider it to be Lynch's masterpiece, but I would argue that it's merely a remedial version of his earlier film, Lost Highway.

Critics and the public did not respond well to Lost Highway. Most people, critics included, do not like ambiguity in their movies. They want clear cut protagonists, antagonists, beginnings middles and ends. Textbook Lynch doesn't work this way. His films are much more vague and open to interpretation, but he always leaves enough clues in there for the discerning viewer to figure out what's going on. Many people criticize Lost Highway for being too hard to follow or not making any sense. Once the "shift" happens in Mulholland Drive, it's quite easy to see whats been going on. While Lost Highway is a bit more ambiguous than Mulholland Drive, the main character Fred has a line in the movie that explains everything if you're paying attention.

The simplicity and similarities of Mulholland Drive compared to Lost Highway makes more sense if you know that Mulholland Drive was a re-worked script for an unaired TV pilot. It wasn't intended to be as complex as one of Lynch's feature films. It was intended to employ Lynchian elements, but not at the expense of viewership and ratings. Lynch put a lot of time and effort into Lost Highway, but it was too complex for the average viewer and went right over their heads. I believe that Mulholland Drive and the statements it made about Hollywood was a means for Lynch to stick it to the same people who crapped all over Lost Highway. "See, I made the same movie, toned down the weirdness and explained everything for you...now you all love it".


***** I ain't nobody's "kid" - my friends and I do this for a living...

...you're just a fan boy trying to be pretentious and give off the vibe that you know the slightest thing about film - like I said, that ******' movie sucked and all the money wasted making it should have been donated to charity.
Genco Importing Co.
Reply
Genco Importing Co.
Reply
post #19 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmbrhs View Post

Dude, you can't just post that scene and expect the average NTer to respond to it logically. It means nothing without seeing the rest of the film. It's one of my Top 10 films of all time. It's incredible. But I'd never expect your average NTer to understand it, let alone that random scene.

 

Agreed on this. I'm a big fan of Lynch and think folks need to watch the film first (maybe even multiple viewings).

post #20 of 86
Dope flick
You whole crew's ravishing, team's untouchable
In the jungle banging Nas, Mobb Deep and Wu
"My Ohhh My"
Reply
You whole crew's ravishing, team's untouchable
In the jungle banging Nas, Mobb Deep and Wu
"My Ohhh My"
Reply
post #21 of 86
MulHolland drive is easily one of the best.movies I've ever seen. Talk about a mind ****.

Saw it back in 2001, it changed my life. Its the movie that helped me realize how much I like movies. Now, 14 years later, I'm a self-proclaimed movie buff lol. And Mulhall and drive sparked my passion for film way back when.
post #22 of 86

:lol didnt remember much about the movie other than naomi watts laura harring scene, but that would be what my 13 year old self would remember about a movie like that at the time...

If someone ever broke it my house looking for money, I'd just laugh, and look for it with them...
Reply
If someone ever broke it my house looking for money, I'd just laugh, and look for it with them...
Reply
post #23 of 86
Yeah, that lezzo scene...whew. "I'm in love with youuuuu"
post #24 of 86
Besides me being freaked out.


What was the message I thought it was just to scare us op
Willing to buy Nike air Jordan 1s 1985-20?? Sz 11-11.5 Pm
Reply
Willing to buy Nike air Jordan 1s 1985-20?? Sz 11-11.5 Pm
Reply
post #25 of 86
How dude Gona drop dead after that bs. Somebody put in a spoiler if that monster was real..
Truculent when provoked. Toko strong...
Reply
Truculent when provoked. Toko strong...
Reply
post #26 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILL LEGAL OPERATION View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by dankenstien88 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ILL LEGAL OPERATION View Post

Easily one of the worst movies I've ever seen in my life...

Plebeian taste detected.

Stick to Michael Bay and Kevin Smith movies kid.
Quote:
Originally Posted by donovandoesit View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ILL LEGAL OPERATION View Post

Easily one of the worst movies I've ever seen in my life...


I can understand your view. It actually makes NO sense at all but as a movie buff I can appreciate the movies cinematography and the directors placement of a lot of things. I feel like with this the screen writers dropped the ball making the script make sense on screen. However this SCENE alone is one of the best I have ever seen in a thriller ever. The build up and the narrative and the dudes expressions are deep. 

If you like Mulholland Drive, you should really check out Lost Highway. It's my favorite Lynch film and plays with many of the same themes as Mulholland Drive.

If you feel like the "screen writers" dropped the ball, I take it you haven't watched much Lynch. Mulholland Drive is pretty damn cut and dry. Most people consider it to be Lynch's masterpiece, but I would argue that it's merely a remedial version of his earlier film, Lost Highway.

Critics and the public did not respond well to Lost Highway. Most people, critics included, do not like ambiguity in their movies. They want clear cut protagonists, antagonists, beginnings middles and ends. Textbook Lynch doesn't work this way. His films are much more vague and open to interpretation, but he always leaves enough clues in there for the discerning viewer to figure out what's going on. Many people criticize Lost Highway for being too hard to follow or not making any sense. Once the "shift" happens in Mulholland Drive, it's quite easy to see whats been going on. While Lost Highway is a bit more ambiguous than Mulholland Drive, the main character Fred has a line in the movie that explains everything if you're paying attention.

The simplicity and similarities of Mulholland Drive compared to Lost Highway makes more sense if you know that Mulholland Drive was a re-worked script for an unaired TV pilot. It wasn't intended to be as complex as one of Lynch's feature films. It was intended to employ Lynchian elements, but not at the expense of viewership and ratings. Lynch put a lot of time and effort into Lost Highway, but it was too complex for the average viewer and went right over their heads. I believe that Mulholland Drive and the statements it made about Hollywood was a means for Lynch to stick it to the same people who crapped all over Lost Highway. "See, I made the same movie, toned down the weirdness and explained everything for you...now you all love it".


***** I ain't nobody's "kid" - my friends and I do this for a living...

...you're just a fan boy trying to be pretentious and give off the vibe that you know the slightest thing about film - like I said, that ******' movie sucked and all the money wasted making it should have been donated to charity.


I apologize if I offended you, but if you "do this for a living" and can't appreciate Lynch... I have to seriously question your credibility.

You don't necessarily have to like his movies, but the fact is that David Lynch treats the subject of evil better than just about anybody else making movies today. His movies aren't anti-moral, but they are definitely anti-formulaic. Please notice that responsibility for evil never in his films devolves easily onto greedy corporations or corrupt politicians or faceless serial killers. Lynch is not interested in the devolution of responsibility and he's not interested judgments of characters. Rather, he's interested in those psychic spaces in which people are capable of evil. He is interested in darkness. And Darkness, in David Lynch's movies, usually wears more than one face. Recall, for example, how Blue Velvet's Frank Booth is both Frank Booth and "the Well-Dressed Man." How Eraserhead's whole postapocalyptic world of demonic conceptions and teratoid offspring and summary decapitations is evil yet how it's "poor" Henry Spencer who ends up a baby-killer.

Lynch’s movies are not about monsters (i.e., people whose intrinsic natures are evil) but rather evil as an environment, a possibility, a force. This helps explain Lynch’s constant deployment of noirish lighting and eerie sound-carpets and grotesque figurants. In his movies, a kind of ambient spiritual antimatter hangs just overhead. It also explains why Lynch’s villains seem not merely wicked or sick but ecstatic, transported; they are possessed… a representation of evil potential that lurks within any mortal soul. The bad guys in Lynch movies are always exultant, orgasmic, most fully present at their most evil moments, and this in turn is because they are not only actuated by evil but literally inspired... they have yielded themselves up to a darkness way bigger than any one person.

Lynch’s idea that evil is a force has extremely unsettling implications. People can be good or bad, but forces have the potential to be everywhere, within anyone. Lynch's interpretation of evil moves and shifts, it pervades. Darkness is in everything, all the time; not ‘lurking below’ or ‘lying in wait’ or ‘hovering on the horizon': evil is here, right now... And so are Light, love, redemption (since these phenomena are also, in Lynch’s work, forces and spirits). In fact, in a Lynchian moral scheme it doesn’t make much sense to talk about either Darkness or about Light in isolation from its opposite. It’s not just that evil is ‘implied by’ good or darkness by light or whatever, but that the evil stuff is contained within the good stuff, encoded in it. You could call this idea of evil Gnostic, or Taoist, or even neo-Hegelian, but it’s also Lynchian, because what Lynch’s movies are all about is creating a narrative space where this idea can be worked out in its fullest detain or to its most uncomfortable consequences.



But then again,what do I know? I'm just a pretentious fan... you're the expert, right ?
post #27 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by dankenstien88 View Post


I apologize if I offended you, but if you "do this for a living" and can't appreciate Lynch... I have to seriously question your credibility.

You don't necessarily have to like his movies, but the fact is that David Lynch treats the subject of evil better than just about anybody else making movies today. His movies aren't anti-moral, but they are definitely anti-formulaic. Please notice that responsibility for evil never in his films devolves easily onto greedy corporations or corrupt politicians or faceless serial killers. Lynch is not interested in the devolution of responsibility and he's not interested judgments of characters. Rather, he's interested in those psychic spaces in which people are capable of evil. He is interested in darkness. And Darkness, in David Lynch's movies, usually wears more than one face. Recall, for example, how Blue Velvet's Frank Booth is both Frank Booth and "the Well-Dressed Man." How Eraserhead's whole postapocalyptic world of demonic conceptions and teratoid offspring and summary decapitations is evil yet how it's "poor" Henry Spencer who ends up a baby-killer.

Lynch’s movies are not about monsters (i.e., people whose intrinsic natures are evil) but rather evil as an environment, a possibility, a force. This helps explain Lynch’s constant deployment of noirish lighting and eerie sound-carpets and grotesque figurants. In his movies, a kind of ambient spiritual antimatter hangs just overhead. It also explains why Lynch’s villains seem not merely wicked or sick but ecstatic, transported; they are possessed… a representation of evil potential that lurks within any mortal soul. The bad guys in Lynch movies are always exultant, orgasmic, most fully present at their most evil moments, and this in turn is because they are not only actuated by evil but literally inspired... they have yielded themselves up to a darkness way bigger than any one person.

Lynch’s idea that evil is a force has extremely unsettling implications. People can be good or bad, but forces have the potential to be everywhere, within anyone. Lynch's interpretation of evil moves and shifts, it pervades. Darkness is in everything, all the time; not ‘lurking below’ or ‘lying in wait’ or ‘hovering on the horizon': evil is here, right now... And so are Light, love, redemption (since these phenomena are also, in Lynch’s work, forces and spirits). In fact, in a Lynchian moral scheme it doesn’t make much sense to talk about either Darkness or about Light in isolation from its opposite. It’s not just that evil is ‘implied by’ good or darkness by light or whatever, but that the evil stuff is contained within the good stuff, encoded in it. You could call this idea of evil Gnostic, or Taoist, or even neo-Hegelian, but it’s also Lynchian, because what Lynch’s movies are all about is creating a narrative space where this idea can be worked out in its fullest detain or to its most uncomfortable consequences.



But then again,what do I know? I'm just a pretentious fan... you're the expert, right ?

lollll ..you're just copying & pasting from somewhere, none of these thoughts are your own, lol. 

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=Lynch%E2%80%99s+idea+that+evil+is+a+force+has+extremely+unsettling+implications&oq=Lynch%E2%80%99s+idea+that+evil+is+a+force+has+extremely+unsettling+implications&aqs=chrome..69i57&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=0&ie=UTF-8

post #28 of 86

well damb, i thought someone wrote a well-typed fancy essay...i was thoroughly impressed but iono what is going on 

If someone ever broke it my house looking for money, I'd just laugh, and look for it with them...
Reply
If someone ever broke it my house looking for money, I'd just laugh, and look for it with them...
Reply
post #29 of 86
Originally Posted by antisocialite View Post
 
Originally Posted by dankenstien88 View Post

I apologize if I offended you, but if you "do this for a living" and can't appreciate Lynch... I have to seriously question your credibility.

You don't necessarily have to like his movies, but the fact is that David Lynch treats the subject of evil better than just about anybody else making movies today. His movies aren't anti-moral, but they are definitely anti-formulaic. Please notice that responsibility for evil never in his films devolves easily onto greedy corporations or corrupt politicians or faceless serial killers. Lynch is not interested in the devolution of responsibility and he's not interested judgments of characters. Rather, he's interested in those psychic spaces in which people are capable of evil. He is interested in darkness. And Darkness, in David Lynch's movies, usually wears more than one face. Recall, for example, how Blue Velvet's Frank Booth is both Frank Booth and "the Well-Dressed Man." How Eraserhead's whole postapocalyptic world of demonic conceptions and teratoid offspring and summary decapitations is evil yet how it's "poor" Henry Spencer who ends up a baby-killer.

Lynch’s movies are not about monsters (i.e., people whose intrinsic natures are evil) but rather evil as an environment, a possibility, a force. This helps explain Lynch’s constant deployment of noirish lighting and eerie sound-carpets and grotesque figurants. In his movies, a kind of ambient spiritual antimatter hangs just overhead. It also explains why Lynch’s villains seem not merely wicked or sick but ecstatic, transported; they are possessed… a representation of evil potential that lurks within any mortal soul. The bad guys in Lynch movies are always exultant, orgasmic, most fully present at their most evil moments, and this in turn is because they are not only actuated by evil but literally inspired... they have yielded themselves up to a darkness way bigger than any one person.

Lynch’s idea that evil is a force has extremely unsettling implications. People can be good or bad, but forces have the potential to be everywhere, within anyone. Lynch's interpretation of evil moves and shifts, it pervades. Darkness is in everything, all the time; not ‘lurking below’ or ‘lying in wait’ or ‘hovering on the horizon': evil is here, right now... And so are Light, love, redemption (since these phenomena are also, in Lynch’s work, forces and spirits). In fact, in a Lynchian moral scheme it doesn’t make much sense to talk about either Darkness or about Light in isolation from its opposite. It’s not just that evil is ‘implied by’ good or darkness by light or whatever, but that the evil stuff is contained within the good stuff, encoded in it. You could call this idea of evil Gnostic, or Taoist, or even neo-Hegelian, but it’s also Lynchian, because what Lynch’s movies are all about is creating a narrative space where this idea can be worked out in its fullest detain or to its most uncomfortable consequences.



But then again,what do I know? I'm just a pretentious fan... you're the expert, right ?

 

lollll ..you're just copying & pasting from somewhere, none of these thoughts are your own, lol. 

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=Lynch%E2%80%99s+idea+that+evil+is+a+force+has+extremely+unsettling+implications&oq=Lynch%E2%80%99s+idea+that+evil+is+a+force+has+extremely+unsettling+implications&aqs=chrome..69i57&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=0&ie=UTF-8

 

Dude thought he was slick and C&P'd from the same material with a couple joints switched around. :lol:{ All over the internet too.

 

Like right here...

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=The+bad+guys+in+Lynch+movies+are+always+exultant%2C+orgasmic%2C+most+fully+present+at+their+most+evil+moments&oq=The+bad+guys+in+Lynch+movies+are+always+exultant%2C+orgasmic%2C+most+fully+present+at+their+most+evil+moments&aqs=chrome..69i57.2078869j0j4&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=122&ie=UTF-8

 

...With your fake deep existential lookin' ***. 

…Veni, Vidi, Vici...

Reply

…Veni, Vidi, Vici...

Reply
post #30 of 86
Movie was pure trash but it did have some enjoyable performances and sequences , very creepy/eerie usage of Los Angeles too .
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General
NikeTalk › NikeTalk Forums › The Lounge › General › Mulholland Drive Diner Scene: This clip is EPIC and will ruin your night....