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The NBA Draft Thread - Page 3

post #61 of 11536
Thread Starter 
Evaluating budding star Ben Simmons through first five collegiate games

http://www.si.com/college-basketball/2015/11/25/ben-simmons-lsu-tigers-nba-draft-scouting-report
post #62 of 11536
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Ben Simmons is an elite prospect, but is he the next superstar?

For the past several years, ESPN Insiders Chad Ford and Kevin Pelton have provided the kind of discussions that are happening in front offices around the NBA, where scouts and statistical experts are breaking down NBA prospects using their "eyes, ears and numbers."

How good is Ben Simmons?

Chad Ford: On Monday, I spoke with several NBA GMs and scouts who said LSU freshman Ben Simmons is the hands-down No. 1 pick in next year's draft. Many feel it isn't even close.

While he might not be as good as LeBron James or Magic Johnson, Simmons certainly plays a bit like them. Kevin, what are the numbers saying about Simmons six games into the season?

Kevin Pelton: So far, so good. Simmons has shown unique ability to take over a game in a variety of ways, as exemplified by his back-to-back games in Brooklyn in this week's Legends Classic.

Against Marquette, Simmons had a 20-20 game, along with five assists, becoming one of only a handful of major-conference players to reach that mark in the past two decades.

Tuesday night against North Carolina State, Simmons never got going offensively -- his only field goal forced overtime in the closing seconds -- but still managed to record a double-double with rebounds and assists, just the 14th such game in the NCAA since 2010-11, according to Sports-Reference.com.

Simmons' advanced stats are strong as well. It's early, and the schedule has been favorable, but he's in the top 10 in NCAA win shares.

What are Simmons' strengths?

Ford: Simmons' combination of size, athleticism and basketball IQ is so unique. It's not every day that you see a player who is 6-foot-10 who truly plays like a point guard.

He has an excellent handle, sees plays before they happen and adds terrific rebounding. His ability to finish at the rim (with both powerful dunks and acrobatic finishes) is special.

But I think what scouts love the most is how Simmons plays the game. He plays with a calm demeanor that belies the fact that he's 19 years old. Coaches covet that type of unselfish, level-headed player.

What do the stats see as his strengths? And do you think they'll translate to the NBA? There aren't a lot of 6-foot-10 point guards in the league.

Pelton: Naturally, that versatility comes out as a strength. In the past two decades, just two players have averaged better than 10 rebounds and four assists per game, both of them at the mid-major level: Ohio's Shaun Stonerook and longtime NBA player Trenton Hassell at Austin Peay. (Draymond Green met both criteria, but not in the same season.)

Simmons is blowing past both marks in the early going. Will that translate to the NBA? The last guy to show similar versatility was UCLA's Kyle Anderson, who averaged 8.8 rebounds and 6.5 assists as a sophomore.

That hasn't translated yet, in part because Anderson, who was drafted 30th overall in 2014 by San Antonio, isn't good enough for the Spurs to build their offense around his skills. Wherever he goes, Simmons almost certainly will be worth that investment.

What has gotten less attention is Simmons filling up the defensive box score. Simmons is averaging 2.6 steals and 1.6 blocks per 40 minutes. Though Simmons hasn't yet made an impact as an individual defender, his ability to make help plays is encouraging in terms of his defensive and athletic potential.

Should we worry about Simmons' shooting?

Ford: Scouts are also quick to point out that Simmons is far from a finished product at this point. He can be a bit passive when it comes to hunting for his shot.

In particular, Simmons doesn't appear confident at all that he can hit open jumpers. Considering that he's shooting just 15 percent from the floor away from the basket and has yet to take a 3 this season, maybe that lack of confidence is justified.

In your view, how badly does his lack of a jumper hurt his draft stock given the offensive shift in the NBA? As Zach Lowe wrote yesterday, everyone is looking for skilled bigs who can stretch the floor. Simmons is certainly skilled, but will his lack of confidence in his jump shot be his undoing?

Pelton: Surely, modern NBA offenses are designed around having a power forward who can make the 3. At the same time, probably the least important shooter on the court is the one with the ball in his hands.

Think of the difference between Dwyane Wade spotting up -- despite his gravity as a cutter -- and handling the ball.

So I think this is even more reason why whatever team drafts Simmons should plan on using him as a point forward.

If he remains uncomfortable pulling up off the dribble, Simmons will surely see the kind of sagging defense San Antonio famously used against LeBron James in both the 2007 and 2013 NBA Finals.

Still, we're a long way from worrying about that, and it's not like Simmons' form appears completely broken. He's making a respectable 73.1 percent of his free throws.

Does Simmons belong among the best prospects of the past decade?

Ford: I've read others make the claim, and have heard from some scouts, that Simmons is the best prospect since LeBron James. Those are pretty huge shoes to fill. There have been some tremendous draft prospects in that span: Kevin Durant, Anthony Davis, Chris Paul, just to name three.

While I think he's going to be really, really good, I'm not sure I'd put him in the KD, AD or CP3 camp yet -- certainly not five games into his freshman season. Those guys are top-five players in the NBA.

Or what about rookies like Karl-Anthony Towns and Kristaps Porzingis? Considering how well they've started, is it really fair to put him in with those two?

I know it's very early and the sample size is quite small, but where does he stack among the other top prospects who have come into the draft?

Pelton: Something we should recognize is the difference between a prospect and a finished product. Even the very best prospects, like the players you mention, were still no sure thing to end up as good as they became in the NBA. Injuries, off-court issues or misevaluation could have tripped them up along the way, as they did with similar prospects like Michael Beasley and Greg Oden.


So just because Simmons is on their level as a prospect doesn't mean he's necessarily going to end up one of the best players in the league.

From a statistical standpoint, one minor concern does jump out: Simmons is using a relatively low percentage of LSU's possessions for an elite prospect. In fact, versions of usage that don't include assists have him barely playing an above-average role in the Tigers' offense.

That will probably increase over the course of the season (Tuesday's six-shot game may just have been an outlier), and scoring certainly doesn't look like Simmons' best skill. But his usage rate bears watching the rest of the season.

Despite that concern, overall Simmons looks like an elite prospect, a college superstar and a future NBA cornerstone.
http://espn.go.com/nba/insider/story/_/id/14219371/is-ben-simmons-next-superstar-nba-draft
post #63 of 11536
I won't beat a dead horse, but that headline is crazy, I don't think he's a lock #1 yet, I still have him #2 but it's close 50/50 right now.
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post #64 of 11536
Will there be concerns about Simmons being able to finish at the rim?

In the glimpses I've seen, he kind of has that Julius Randle syndrome. I might be wrong
post #65 of 11536
Long season , n the draft board always changing ...as of now tho Simmons is looking like the only player with star potential , other prospects can still be good tho
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post #66 of 11536
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addict4Sneakers View Post

Will there be concerns about Simmons being able to finish at the rim?

In the glimpses I've seen, he kind of has that Julius Randle syndrome. I might be wrong

Your definitely wrong laugh.gif

One of his strengths is finishing at the rim. He has a good touch...quirky floaters, and he finishes with his off hand more than his dominant hand...and that throws defenders off.

We're 5 games in to his freshman career, and he's shown he can do everything but shoot. Becoming a better and more confident shooter is vital. I think he'll become an average to good shooter.

Ben doesn't need to become a 40% shooter from 3, he just needs to become a confident shooter that will keep the defense honest.
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post #67 of 11536
He has more flaws in his game than just shooting, half court scoring insticnts, soft, poor defensive IQ.


how many people have gone from complete like horrific non - shooter, to solid?

Blake Griffin but he was a pure PF, Ben seems too soft to play PF in the NBA. People are underselling how far he has to go as a shooter. He's not only terrible but he's afraid to shoot.


It's still 50/50 him and Skal, but its a long season and has time to solidify the top spot.
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post #68 of 11536
Quote:
Originally Posted by Osh Kosh Bosh View Post

He has more flaws in his game than just shooting, half court scoring insticnts, soft, poor defensive IQ.


how many people have gone from complete like horrific non - shooter, to solid?

Blake Griffin but he was a pure PF, Ben seems too soft to play PF in the NBA. People are underselling how far he has to go as a shooter. He's not only terrible but he's afraid to shoot.


It's still 50/50 him and Skal, but its a long season and has time to solidify the top spot.

Idk what Simmons has shown you that makes you think he's "soft". I also don't think he has bad half court scoring instincts. And I don't think his jumper is "horrific".

I think as of right now, he's the clear cut #1 prospect. But it's early...it's November. I think by April, he'll still be the clear cut #1 prospect.

If Ben Simmons stayed in Australia and was a relatively unknown prospect, I'm sure you'd love him laugh.gif.
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post #69 of 11536
Quote:
Originally Posted by WavyCrocket View Post


Idk what Simmons has shown you that makes you think he's "soft". I also don't think he has bad half court scoring instincts. And I don't think his jumper is "horrific".

I think as of right now, he's the clear cut #1 prospect. But it's early...it's November. I think by April, he'll still be the clear cut #1 prospect.

If Ben Simmons stayed in Australia and was a relatively unknown prospect, I'm sure you'd love him laugh.gif.

I'm gonna have to agree with you. How is he soft and how does he have bad half court scoring instincts? I feel like he's very patient and methodical in the half court when it comes to attacking the defense. There is nothing about his game that says bad instincts on either side of the floor, so how does he have poor defensive IQ exactly?

 

The constant comparisons to Odom and now Simmons is too soft to play PF? Don't see why Ben couldn't start out as a 3/4 hybrid. Simmons has size and there's nothing about him that has suggested he's scared of contact or anything

post #70 of 11536
Don't see any issue with him playing PF, especially in today's NBA.
post #71 of 11536
The softness is on defense, watch him closely on that end; gives up easilly, dies on screens, wont fight all the time to deny or hold his position. He locks in every once in a while but overall he's pretty aloof on that end.
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post #72 of 11536
Quote:
Originally Posted by WavyCrocket View Post

Idk what Simmons has shown you that makes you think he's "soft". I also don't think he has bad half court scoring instincts. And I don't think his jumper is "horrific".

I think as of right now, he's the clear cut #1 prospect. But it's early...it's November. I think by April, he'll still be the clear cut #1 prospect.

If Ben Simmons stayed in Australia and was a relatively unknown prospect, I'm sure you'd love him laugh.gif.

How isn't he horrific? He never shoots them and when he does he misses erratically. Like what else would you call it? He couldn't shoot in HS, AAU, he basically refuses to shoot now, apparently he's bricking in warm ups.

What else would you call that other than horrific?

His footwork pre shot prep is terrible, his release point changes with every shot. it's bad, and he has a long way to go to improve it. He can, but it's going to take a ton of work. People are saying Lebron couldn't shoot, Lebron wasn't good but he wasn't a non-shooter, he wasn't afraid to shoot, he could get streaky, you couldn't play 8 ft off him.

Blake was probabaly just as bad but like I said he's was a legit PF, there are quesitons if SImmons has the toughness for that.



I follow the draft closer than probably anyone on this board, but disregard what I'm saying if you want to. *shrugs*
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post #73 of 11536
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al3xis View Post

Don't see any issue with him playing PF, especially in today's NBA.


I feel like you were higher on Skal for a bit, has that changed?
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post #74 of 11536
Quote:
Originally Posted by Osh Kosh Bosh View Post

How isn't he horrific? He never shoots them and when he does he misses erratically. Like what else would you call it? He couldn't shoot in HS, AAU, he basically refuses to shoot now, apparently he's bricking in warm ups.

What else would you call that other than horrific?

His footwork pre shot prep is terrible, his release point changes with every shot. it's bad, and he has a long way to go to improve it. He can, but it's going to take a ton of work. People are saying Lebron couldn't shoot, Lebron wasn't good but he wasn't a non-shooter, he wasn't afraid to shoot, he could get streaky, you couldn't play 8 ft off him.

Blake was probabaly just as bad but like I said he's was a legit PF, there are quesitons if SImmons has the toughness for that.



I follow the draft closer than probably anyone on this board, but disregard what I'm saying if you want to. *shrugs*

Ben is a legit PF in today's NBA. Far from "soft". He's not a stopper on defense yet, but shows potential as a versatile defender that can switch everything. Additionally, If Blake can develop a jumper, I'm sure Ben can.

You're not the only one that follows the drafts and prospects on this board man laugh.gif.
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post #75 of 11536
Quote:
Originally Posted by WavyCrocket View Post

Ben is a legit PF in today's NBA. Far from "soft". He's not a stopper on defense yet, but shows potential as a versatile defender that can switch everything. Additionally, If Blake can develop a jumper, I'm sure Ben can.

You're not the only one that follows the drafts and prospects on this board man laugh.gif.

I didn't say I was the only one, i said I follow it closer than anyone.

I think that is a pretty reasonable statement.
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post #76 of 11536
I thought people were behind on Skal mostly to put him into consideration as best in his class. And I could easily be talked into him, but Simmons falls more in line with my type of player. So right now it's Ben and it's inherently biased.
post #77 of 11536
The difference between Simmons being really good and being a superstar will come down to his ability to shoot. Plain and simple.
post #78 of 11536
Thread Starter 


Valentine has been ridiculous so far. Another second round Spartan steal?
post #79 of 11536

He might play his way into the first round

post #80 of 11536
Thread Starter 


post #81 of 11536
Thread Starter 
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post #82 of 11536

Not OKB, but from reddit..

 

 

post #83 of 11536
Sorry missed your requests not as much NT time lately.
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post #84 of 11536
Thread Starter 
post #85 of 11536
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
The college basketball season is now a month old, which means it's time for our first Big Board update since the season began.

2016 NBA draft
Get ready for Ben Simmons, Skal Labissiere and the 2016 draft with analysis from Chad Ford and other ESPN experts.

Mock Draft 2.0 | Big Board 2.0
Top 10 Cs | Top 10 PFs
Top 10 SFs | Top 10 SGs
Top 10 PGs | Top 100 rankings
While scouts are still preaching patience, especially with freshmen, stronger opinions are forming on top prospects. Once we begin conference play in January, they'll get even sharper.

This is a more detailed look at the top 30 players in our Top 100. It tracks player movement and stock fluctuation, and gives you the latest intel from NBA scouts.

So here it is: Big Board 3.0.

1. Ben Simmons


Previous rank: No. 1
LSU
Freshman
Forward

Simmons is the prize of this draft. There really isn't a close second right now. His combination of size, athleticism, court vision and rebounding prowess are unique, and he's ultra productive, ranking No. 7 in the country in player efficiency rating.

Yes, his jump shot is a source of concern; he's made just 13 shots away from the rim all season and is shooting just 28.6 percent from there, according to hoop-math.com. But given all the other skills he brings to the table and a solid free throw percentage, scouts don't think it will keep him from being a star.

Simmons video

2. Brandon Ingram


Previous rank: No. 4
Duke
Freshman
Forward

Ingram bounced back from a slow start to the season in early December with a 24-point explosion against Indiana, followed by a 23-point game against Buffalo and a 26-point effort against Georgia Southern. During that three-game stretch he shot 8-for-14 from 3 and 27-for-43 (63 percent) inside the arc.

Obviously, that's a pretty small sample size; two of the three opponents were mid-majors and Indiana is a pathetic defensive team. Still, scouts get excited whenever you talk about a long, 6-10 small forward with athleticism who can shoot. Ingram needs to get stronger and continue to work on his defense, but the tools are there for him to be a star if he can keep it up.

Ingram video

3. Dragan Bender


Previous rank: No. 3
Croatia
Age: 18
Forward/center

After impressing scouts in September with exhibitions in Chicago and Brooklyn, things have quieted down for Bender. In nine Israeli league games, he is averaging just 3.6 PPG and 2.0 RPG in 11 MPG for Maccabi Tel Aviv. In Euroleague play, that number drops to 2.1 PPG and 1.4 RPG in 10 MPG.

Scouts were hoping to see him play a much bigger role. I don't think lack of playing time has hurt his stock at all, but it has kept him from climbing up a board that's wide open after Simmons.

4. Skal Labissiere


Previous rank: No. 2
Kentucky
Freshman
Center/forward

Scouts are preaching patience with Labissiere ... but it's hard to be patient. He dropped a zero-point, zero-rebound game in a win against Arizona State on Saturday and was a complete nonfactor on both ends of the floor. His lack of strength has hurt him to the point where there's been only one game in which which he's grabbed more than five rebounds. But there's still reason to have hope.

Head coach John Calipari is trying to toughen up Labissiere by asking him to play in the post. He's much more comfortable on the perimeter, though (he's shooting 47.6 percent from there and 63 percent of all his shots have been jumpers), and projects as a potential stretch-4 in the NBA. We haven't seen his 3-point shot, but he has one. However, if this keeps up through the entire season, his stock could plummet. He turns 20 in March. That's old for a player with such little production.

5. Jaylen Brown


Previous rank: No. 5
Cal
Freshman
Forward

Brown continues to look the part athletically, but the production has been shaky so far. He's playing out of position at power forward, which explains some of the problem, but it's his shot that has scouts wringing their hands.

He's shooting just 15 percent on his 2-point jumpers this season and just 25 percent from 3.

6. Henry Ellenson


Previous rank: No. 7
Marquette
Freshman
Forward/center

Scouts continue to warm on Ellenson to the point that he might be a hot month away from surpassing both Brown and Labissiere on our board.

He's big, mobile, rebounds and can really shoot the basketball. His 3-point shot hasn't really been falling, but he's shooting a red-hot 51 percent on 2-point jumpers. He's the prototypical stretch-4 in the new NBA.

7. Jakob Poeltl


Previous rank: No. 12
Utah
Sophomore
Center

It looks like Poeltl made a great decision to go back to Utah for his sophomore season. He got stronger over the summer and it's paid off big time on the court. He's averaging 20 PPG and 10 RPG on 70 percent shooting from the field, adding in 2.2 blocks per game -- and he leads the NCAA in PER at 39.11.

While the league doesn't obsess over big men they way it once did, Poeltl has a lot of fans in the NBA ranks at the moment.

8. Jamal Murray


Previous rank: No. 6
Kentucky
Freshman
Guard

A little bit of that shine Murray picked up over the Nike Hoop Summit and FIBA Americas tournament seems to be wearing off. He is the Wildcats' leading scorer, but turnovers and poor shooting have haunted him. And there's still a raging debate among scouts about whether he's a 1 or a 2.

Still, Murray's talent keeps him strongly in the top 10.

Murray video

9. Kris Dunn


Previous rank: No. 13
Providence
Junior
Guard

Most of the scouts I've spoken with love Dunn, and there are plenty of reasons why. He's an athletic assist machine averaging a whopping 3.4 steals per game. But he's actually regressed in a key area this season: His 3-point shooting is down to just 23 percent.

Scouts want to see major improvement going forward, and with just a couple months before he turns 22, I'm not sure Dunn's got much of a ceiling left.

10. Furkan Korkmaz


Previous rank: No. 11
Turkey
Age: 18
Forward

Korkmaz's minutes off the bench have been slipping. He's averaging just 2.6 PPG in nine MPG for Anadoulu Efes Istanbul in the Euroleague. His numbers jump up to 6.9 PPG in the Turkish league. Nothing to wow you, with the exception of his 48 percent shooting from deep.

Without a lot of elite 2-guards in the draft, Korkmaz's value should continue to hold steady, even if his playing situation doesn't improve.

11. Ivan Rabb


Previous rank: No. 19
Cal
Freshman
Forward/center

After the top 10 are off the board, the draft drops off pretty rapidly in terms of talent. Scouts were skeptical that Rabb would be so productive so quickly, but his early returns are encouraging. He's shooting nearly 80 percent in the paint and a very impressive 50 percent on his 2-point jumpers. His rebounding rate is just a little less than Poeltl's and he's been a terrific shot-blocker early.

Teams covet mobile bigs who can defend the rim and stretch the defense, and Rabb shows early signs he can do a little of both. Scouts hope he follows Poeltl's lead and stays for another year to add strength, but if he does declare, he's looking more and more like a legitimate lottery pick.

12. Demetrius Jackson


Previous rank: No. 18
Notre Dame
Junior
Guard

While most of the early point guard discussion has centered on Murray versus Dunn, don't count out Jackson, who is having a terrific junior season. His ability to shoot at a high percentage from anywhere on the floor and some major toughness are his biggest selling points.

13. Cheick Diallo


Previous rank: No. 9
Kansas
Freshman
Forward/center

The NCAA finally gave Diallo the green light. Bill Self? Not so much.

In KU's two games that were close, Diallo played just seven minutes in each. The energy is there, but his offensive awareness is still a work in progress. Teams love his long-term potential, but right now he looks pretty far away from contributing in the NBA.

14. Caris LeVert


Previous rank: No. 23
Michigan
Senior
Guard/forward

With the exception of one horrific 1-for-13 shooting performance against SMU, LeVert has been terrific for Michigan. He's shooting the ball well, has three games with seven or more assists and has been relentless getting to the line. Seniors typically struggle to crack the lottery, but remember, LeVert is a year younger than most of the players in his class.

15. Timothe Luwawu


Previous rank: No. 28
France
Age: 20
Guard/forward

Luwawu is currently the starting small forward for Mega Vizura in the Adriatic League. He's averaging 15 PPG, 4.4 RPG and shooting 37.6 percent from 3. His defense is ahead of his offense, but if his shots keep falling, he's got a chance to crack the lottery.

16. Thomas Bryant



Previous rank: No. 16
Indiana
Freshman
Center

Bryant struggled at the Maui Invitational, and the general consensus was he was still too raw on both ends of the ball to seriously consider jumping to the NBA. However, given the dearth of top-end talent this late in the draft -- along with Bryant's scintillating 72-percent field goal percentage (nearly 90 percent of shots are at the rim) -- someone will take him on as a project and give him time to grow.

17. Jonathan Jeanne

Previous rank: N/A
France
Age: 18
Center/forward

I wrote about Jeanne in the last mock draft and the response from NBA scouts was telling -- the cat is now out of the bag. He's the young European that virtually every team hopes will slide to them. He's super thin, but his size and versatility are both coveted in the league right now. Given the lack of depth in this draft, he is a project that teams could gamble on early.

18. Wade Baldwin IV


Previous rank: No. 29
Vanderbilt
Sophomore
Guard

Baldwin continues to lure scouts with his scoring ability and court vision. He's shooting 50 percent from 3 and 61 percent at the rim, but his midrange game is still a major work in progress. Baldwin doesn't particularly wow, but he's one of the most stable point guards on the board.

19. Stephen Zimmerman



Previous rank: No. 17
UNLV
Freshman
Center

Zimmerman is selling himself as a mobile big who can face the basket and protect the rim. He's been a solid shot-blocker for UNLV, but his back-to-the-basket game still needs work and teams question his toughness right now.

20. Damian Jones


Previous rank: No. 14
Vanderbilt
Junior
Center/forward

Jones hasn't taken the big leap scouts thought he'd take this season. He's roughly the same player he was last season. His size and athleticism continue to make him an intriguing prospect, though scouts seem to be lowering their expectations on what he could be in the NBA.

21. Diamond Stone


Previous rank: No. 15
Maryland
Freshman
Center

Ten years ago, Stone probably would rank 10 spots higher on this list. He's an old-school center with a knack for scoring with his back to the basket and he's off to a very solid start for Maryland. However, with the new emphasis on bigs that stretch and protect, he's not quite as valuable.

22. Grayson Allen


Previous rank: No. 22
Duke
Sophomore
Guard

Allen has been a dominant scorer for Duke and a lights-out shooter from 3 this season. However, his one bad game against Kentucky highlighted the major concerns. He's undersized to play the 2 at the next level and his decision-making as a point guard leaves a lot to be desired. If he were two inches taller, his stock would be much higher.

23. Denzel Valentine


Previous rank: N/A
Michigan State
Senior
Forward/guard

Valentine doesn't check the normal boxes scouts are typically looking for in a wing. He lacks elite size and athleticism for the position. However, he's been a triple-double threat for the Spartans all season, and given the NBA's recent emphasis on versatility, he's drawing significant interest from scouts.

24. Zhou Qi



Previous rank: No. 21
China
Age: 19
Center

Zhou is our fifth international prospect. It's his elite size and versatile skill set that have NBA teams intrigued.

He's averaging 18.8 PPG, 10.2 RPG, 4.2 BPG while shooting 68 percent from the floor for Xinjiang this season. He's even 4-for-6 from 3 this season. He just needs to add a lot of strength to handle the rigors of the paint in the NBA.

25. Isaiah Briscoe


Previous rank: No. 25
Kentucky
Freshman
Guard

Briscoe has been a strong defender for Kentucky and has been aggressive getting to the basket. With Tyler Ulis out, he's shown signs of being able to handle the point guard spot. But his poor shooting, both from 3 and the foul line (39 percent!), gives scouts pause.

26. Malik Newman


Previous rank: No. 10
Mississippi State
Freshman
Guard

Newman is off to a disappointing start for Mississippi State. Billed as a hybrid point guard with elite scoring ability coming out of high school, he's struggled to hit shots and run Mississippi State's offense so far. His numbers don't really warrant him this high, but teams still are intrigued with his talent if he figures things out.

27. Domantas Sabonis



Previous rank: No. 26
Gonzaga
Sophomore
Forward

Sabonis continues to dominate the paint as both a rebounder and low-post scorer. But his lack of elite athleticism and 3-point shot make him a bit of a dinosaur when it comes to the modern NBA power forward.

28. Carlton Bragg



Previous rank: No. 27
Kansas
Freshman
Forward

Bragg is playing just 12 minutes a night for the Jayhawks, but every time he steps onto the court, good things happen. He most likely will spend at least one more year in Lawrence, but NBA teams love versatile forwards like Bragg who thrive both inside and outside the paint.

29. Buddy Hield


Previous rank: N/A
Oklahoma
Senior
Guard

Hield has been on the NBA radar for a while, but scouts always have been concerned about his inconsistency. As a senior he's putting it all together, shooting 50 percent from 3, getting to the line six times a game (shooting 90 percent from the stripe) and scoring a career-high 22.7 PPG.

He's undersized for his position, but scouts love his moxie.

30. Isaac Haas


Previous rank: N/A
Purdue
Sophomore
Center

Haas has been incredibly efficient both as a low-post scorer (73 percent shooting at the rim) and facing the basket (57 percent shooting on 2-point jumpers). He's not an elite athlete, but at 7-2, 297 lbs. he doesn't have to be. Plus, he ranks second among all college players in PER.

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Instagram. | just my art and photography. #NT will follow back. Also Flickr.
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post #86 of 11536
Still want Jaylen Brown on the Sixers badly. Crazy potential.
post #87 of 11536
Thread Starter 
DX updated their mock draft; Simmons, Ingram, Bender, Dunn and Labissiere.

It's still early, but I thought it was laughable the Providence coaches were selling Dunn on being a top five pick last April. Now here we are.


post #88 of 11536
The duke starting 5 haircut has taken over college ball is my main takeaway from watching a couple highlights of prospects
post #89 of 11536
Quote:
Originally Posted by pums View Post

The duke starting 5 haircut has taken over college ball is my main takeaway from watching a couple highlights of prospects

Basketball, football, college, high school, pro......they all have the same damn haircut now.
post #90 of 11536
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buc Em View Post

Basketball, football, college, high school, pro......they all have the same damn haircut now.

70s was Afros
80s was flat tops
90s was Flat tops/regulars
00's Cornrows
10's Cruddy Temps
Ravens, O's, Nuggets, Jazz
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Ravens, O's, Nuggets, Jazz
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