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A black police officer complained about racism. He says his department retaliated by firing him.

post #1 of 34
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Quote:

A black police officer complained about racism. He says his department retaliated by firing him.

 
By Cleve R. Wootson Jr. November 17
 

David Mitchell retired as a lieutenant with the San Diego Police Department in 2014 — but he wasn’t done being a police officer.

 

So he signed on with the Chula Vista Police Department, just outside San Diego. Like all lateral entry officers, he had to go through training; but as a 24-year law-enforcement veteran, Mitchell didn’t think it would be a hassle, his attorney said.

 

He had been a SWAT officer and once saved a woman’s life. As a ranking officer, he was already well-versed in police procedures and California law. He planned to make it through his probationary period and wear the Chula Vista police badge until he was ready to call it quits for good.

 

Then came the racist comments.

 

Mitchell was in Chula Vista’s Woodlawn Park last summer when a training officer said, “They used to call this n—– hill,” according to a lawsuit.

 

Then, the officer recounted how once, in the heat of a high-speed chase, he had almost blurted out “‘n—– hill as a location.”

 

Later, Mitchell and another training officer were called to a house that was “messy and dirty” for a domestic incident, the suit said. When they left, the training officer told Mitchell:

 

“That’s some jigaboo trailer trash s—, dude.”

 

 

“Jigaboo” is a racial slur for black people.

 

During another call at a bar, a field training officer referred to the patrons as “Nancies,” a derogatory term for gay people.

 

Mitchell, who is black, told the training officers’ supervisor about the comments and filed a complaint with the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing, his attorney said.

 

“This is really just an experienced lieutenant, a level-headed person who’s doing the right thing and reporting it,” the lawyer, Don Gilleon, told The Washington Post. “This is not someone who’s complaining about a hostile environment and saying I’m being harmed by this. . . . Sometimes people make mistakes. They say stupid things, and as long as it gets handled  appropriately, the department can improve.”

 

Instead, Gilleon said, the department retaliated.

 

Mitchell’s lawsuit says that after complaining, he was placed on administrative leave while the city hired an outside law firm to investigate his claims.

 

Two months later, his supervisor told him to come back to the office “and to make sure his police equipment was available to be turned over,” the lawsuit said.

 

Mitchell’s complaints were unfounded, the city told him, and he was being fired.

 

On Sept. 9, 2015, Mitchell took the first step toward suing Chula Vista. The actions of the officers could be remedied, his attorney said, but the retaliation had bigger ramifications.

 

“When you punish someone for speaking out, you’re really taking two steps back,” Gilleon said. “You’re sending a message, ‘Don’t you dare speak up because look what’s happened to Mitchell.’ ”

 

Chula Vista Assistant City Attorney Bart Miesfeld told The Post he couldn’t comment on the case.

 

The City of Chula Vista officially settled with Gilleon for $175,000 this week.

 

In return, Gilleon has dropped his discrimination lawsuit, and his attorney says the department is taking a hard look at racial insensitivity in its ranks.

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2016/11/17/a-black-police-officer-complained-about-racism-he-says-his-department-retaliated-by-firing-him/?utm_term=.72fbeafbe152

 

thoughts? 8o 

post #2 of 34
I think that turned out well
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post #3 of 34
Cops don't like snitches either. Who would've thought?
post #4 of 34
Thread Starter 

is it really snitching when you see colleagues discriminate against people of your color?

post #5 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hand2HandKing View Post
 

is it really snitching when you see colleagues discriminate against people of your color?

 

Would we expect a justice system governed by white supremacy to act any different?

post #6 of 34
Thread Starter 

im jus sayin u said snitching like he broke code with racists

post #7 of 34
post #8 of 34
White supremacists in orange county california? No way man, im not buying it.
post #9 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by lamekilla View Post

Cops don't like snitches either. Who would've thought?

Snitching or not, reporting racism in the police system is a civic duty.

Cops should be applauding that rather than shunning it. But we all know how the blue wall of silence works.

post #10 of 34
So he didn't experience racism? He heard name-calling?
post #11 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico x Hood View Post

So he didn't experience racism? He heard name-calling?

Racial slurs and other derogatory terms. There's various degrees of racism.

Using racial slurs is still racism at the end of the day.

That kind of behavior does not belong in the police force and should carry severe penalties.

Police officers are supposed to uphold justice, not uphold racial bias.

post #12 of 34
What I see is an overly sensitive man. Listen bro, politically incorrect **** happens everywhere, in every damn industry. And there's a level of understanding that **** just happens. There's a code and he broke it.

I liken this **** to construction workers talking about women and now imagine the dude who works the wracking ball decides to complain to the foreman that some of the men are referring to women in a derogatory way. It's overly sensitive ********.

I used to work in a restaurant when I was younger, the **** I'd hear in the kitchen might make Lil Wayne cringe. But it is what it is, it's all jokes and people take it in stride.
post #13 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico x Hood View Post

What I see is an overly sensitive man. Listen bro, politically incorrect **** happens everywhere, in every damn industry. And there's a level of understanding that **** just happens. There's a code and he broke it.

I liken this **** to construction workers talking about women and now imagine the dude who works the wracking ball decides to complain to the foreman that some of the men are referring to women in a derogatory way. It's overly sensitive ********.

I used to work in a restaurant when I was younger, the **** I'd hear in the kitchen might make Lil Wayne cringe. But it is what it is, it's all jokes and people take it in stride.

Just because people are used to something going on doesn't make it right. In what way is referring to a part of town "N*gger Hill" a joke? There's nothing comical about that.
post #14 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico x Hood View Post

What I see is an overly sensitive man. Listen bro, politically incorrect **** happens everywhere, in every damn industry. And there's a level of understanding that **** just happens. There's a code and he broke it.

I liken this **** to construction workers talking about women and now imagine the dude who works the wracking ball decides to complain to the foreman that some of the men are referring to women in a derogatory way. It's overly sensitive ********.

I used to work in a restaurant when I was younger, the **** I'd hear in the kitchen might make Lil Wayne cringe. But it is what it is, it's all jokes and people take it in stride.

If you overheard your boss talking about ******* or make repeated references to racism on multiple occasions, would you let it go and go on about your day?

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post #15 of 34
All jokes aren't funny to everyone. That's why I called him overly sensitive. Unless these guys was out harassing black and gay people or any overt discrimination which I didn't see mentioned in the article. Then this guy literally complained about name calling.
post #16 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico x Hood View Post

All jokes aren't funny to everyone. That's why I called him overly sensitive. Unless these guys was out harassing black and gay people or any overt discrimination which I didn't see mentioned in the article. Then this guy literally complained about name calling.

I asked if you would be personally offended or would you let it go if you heard your boss using the word ****** and making repeated references to racism.

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post #17 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico x Hood View Post

What I see is an overly sensitive man. Listen bro, politically incorrect **** happens everywhere, in every damn industry. And there's a level of understanding that **** just happens. There's a code and he broke it.

I liken this **** to construction workers talking about women and now imagine the dude who works the wracking ball decides to complain to the foreman that some of the men are referring to women in a derogatory way. It's overly sensitive ********.

I used to work in a restaurant when I was younger, the **** I'd hear in the kitchen might make Lil Wayne cringe. But it is what it is, it's all jokes and people take it in stride.

Yeah, but what you may tolerate is not the same for everyone else. Can't treat the workplace as an environment where you can let anything fly, then get upset when someone gets offended or reports you to HR.
post #18 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico x Hood View Post

What I see is an overly sensitive man. Listen bro, politically incorrect **** happens everywhere, in every damn industry. And there's a level of understanding that **** just happens. There's a code and he broke it.

I liken this **** to construction workers talking about women and now imagine the dude who works the wracking ball decides to complain to the foreman that some of the men are referring to women in a derogatory way. It's overly sensitive ********.

I used to work in a restaurant when I was younger, the **** I'd hear in the kitchen might make Lil Wayne cringe. But it is what it is, it's all jokes and people take it in stride.

Construction workers aren't officers of the law. They build things. Whatever views they have does not affect their ability to do their job unless they go around harassing people on the job.

Reporting racism in the police force isn't about being sensitive or being personally offended. Racial bias is a significant problem in the police force and it can have terrible effects on their job performance. Why do you think a judge ruled stop and frisk as unconstitutional in NYC? Because NY police officers' racial bias had a clear negative influence on their interactions with the civilians they're supposed to protect against injustice.

And as we've seen in more extreme cases, that racial bias can lead to the tragic loss of a civilian's life.

Letting that kind of behavior slide in the police force, however innocent it may seem, is detrimental to both the police and the citizens it's supposed to protect.

post #19 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by RIP sleazyy View Post

I asked if you would be personally offended or would you let it go if you heard your boss using the word ****** and making repeated references to racism.

Of course I would. I'm black. I don't condone white people saying it around me and speak up. If I were ID holla at the training officer personally. And also the article stated that officer told the black dude "they used to call it ****** hill" and then on the radio he almost said it. Come on now. Dude was too damn sensitive.
post #20 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colombia View Post

Construction workers aren't officers of the law. They build things. Whatever views they have does not affect their ability to do their job unless they go around harassing people on the job.
Reporting racism in the police force isn't about being sensitive or being personally offended. Racial bias is a significant problem in the police force and it can have terrible effects on their job performance. Why do you think a judge ruled stop and frisk as unconstitutional in NYC? Because NY police officers' racial bias had a clear negative influence on their interactions with the civilians they're supposed to protect against injustice.
And as we've seen in more extreme cases, that racial bias can lead to the tragic loss of a civilian's life.

And that's why I said if there were instances of overt discrimination towards blacks and gays then this guy would have a leg to stand on. But based on the article, I saw no evidence of that.
post #21 of 34
Why did he retire only to become a PO in another city with plans of retiring again after the probationary period?

I mean, it sucks that police officers use crude language but what did this guy think he was signing up for? You're a Black police officer in a major city in California.... I'm surprised he didn't hear or see worse.

I'm not saying he can't be offended, he has every right to complain, but the timing is odd. 60 years old with 24 years on the force and you're filing lawsuits now with retirement on the horizon? Hmmm. He knew what it was. laugh.gif I hope gets that check though.
post #22 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico x Hood View Post


And that's why I said if there were instances of overt discrimination towards blacks and gays then this guy would have a leg to stand on. But based on the article, I saw no evidence of that.

You're right but wouldn't you agree that it's best to try and do something about this kind of behavior before it translates into overt discrimination rather than after? Does it need to go that far before something should be done about it?

post #23 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico x Hood View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by RIP sleazyy View Post

I asked if you would be personally offended or would you let it go if you heard your boss using the word ****** and making repeated references to racism.

Of course I would. I'm black. I don't condone white people saying it around me and speak up. If I were ID holla at the training officer personally. And also the article stated that officer told the black dude "they used to call it ****** hill" and then on the radio he almost said it. Come on now. Dude was too damn sensitive.

What about the jigaboo part? Was he being sensitive about that too?

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post #24 of 34
Man I look at jigaboo like spear chucker. It's such a ridiculous term, I'd probably laugh if I ever heard it in real life. They even had to define it in the article. The **** ain even edited in the article on here. Cmon now.
post #25 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by ERACISM View Post

Why did he retire only to become a PO in another city with plans of retiring again after the probationary period?

I mean, it sucks that police officers use crude language but what did this guy think he was signing up for? You're a Black police officer in a major city in California.... I'm surprised he didn't hear or see worse.

I'm not saying he can't be offended, he has every right to complain, but the timing is odd. 60 years old with 24 years on the force and you're filing lawsuits now with retirement on the horizon? Hmmm. He knew what it was. laugh.gif I hope gets that check though.
The whole timing of things did seem kinda weird to me too. I don't even see why they would hire him at 60 years old.
post #26 of 34
Rico gone Rico
post #27 of 34
Rico back at it with the ****-ery

Dude seems no problem with police being racist. Not like that would have any effect on their job and who they profile....

Oh wait...
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post #28 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico x Hood View Post

Man I look at jigaboo like spear chucker. It's such a ridiculous term, I'd probably laugh if I ever heard it in real life. They even had to define it in the article. The **** ain even edited in the article on here. Cmon now.

It is mind blowing to me that you're in one thread complaining about political statements in theater but in another thread calling someone sensitive for being offended by racial slurs laugh.gif

"Our grandfathers had to run, run, run. My generation's out of breath. We ain't running no more."
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"Our grandfathers had to run, run, run. My generation's out of breath. We ain't running no more."
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post #29 of 34
He got $175K
post #30 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by RIP sleazyy View Post

It is mind blowing to me that you're in one thread complaining about political statements in theater but in another thread calling someone sensitive for being offended by racial slurs laugh.gif

He is definitely overly sensitive. The article gave the examples of the racism he faced and honestly it was timid at best. Definitely an overreaction or some kind of possible opportunism as someone already stated.

The political thread is about the right of the consumer to not be brow beaten with partisan political statements with no recourse.
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