Anybody Else Follow the Eightfold Path?

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Past couple of days I've embraced a few Buddhist principles and looking to eventually start meditating. Anybody else consider themselves zen? How's that going for you?
BTW for any of those wondering, here is a brief, simple rundown of the Eightfold Path.

1. Right View
Right view is the beginning and the end of the path, it simply means to see and to understand things as they really are and to realise the Four Noble Truth. As such, right view is the cognitive aspect of wisdom. It means to see things through, to grasp the impermanent and imperfect nature of worldly objects and ideas, and to understand the law of karma and karmic conditioning. Right view is not necessarily an intellectual capacity, just as wisdom is not just a matter of intelligence. Instead, right view is attained, sustained, and enhanced through all capacities of mind. It begins with the intuitive insight that all beings are subject to suffering and it ends with complete understanding of the true nature of all things. Since our view of the world forms our thoughts and our actions, right view yields right thoughts and right actions.

http://2. Right Intention

While right view refers to the cognitive aspect of wisdom, right intention refers to the volitional aspect, i.e. the kind of mental energy that controls our actions. Right intention can be described best as commitment to ethical and mental self-improvement. Buddha distinguishes three types of right intentions: 1. the intention of renunciation, which means resistance to the pull of desire, 2. the intention of good will, meaning resistance to feelings of anger and aversion, and 3. the intention of harmlessness, meaning not to think or act cruelly, violently, or aggressively, and to develop compassion.

http://3. Right Speech

Right speech is the first principle of ethical conduct in the eightfold path. Ethical conduct is viewed as a guideline to moral discipline, which supports the other principles of the path. This aspect is not self-sufficient, however, essential, because mental purification can only be achieved through the cultivation of ethical conduct. The importance of speech in the context of Buddhist ethics is obvious: words can break or save lives, make enemies or friends, start war or create peace. Buddha explained right speech as follows: 1. to abstain from false speech, especially not to tell deliberate lies and not to speak deceitfully, 2. to abstain from slanderous speech and not to use words maliciously against others, 3. to abstain from harsh words that offend or hurt others, and 4. to abstain from idle chatter that lacks purpose or depth. Positively phrased, this means to tell the truth, to speak friendly, warm, and gently and to talk only when necessary.

http://4. Right Action

Thesecond ethical principle, right action, involves the body as naturalmeans of expression, as it refers to deeds that involve bodily actions.Unwholesome actions lead to unsound states of mind, while wholesomeactions lead to sound states of mind. Again, the principle is explainedin terms of abstinence: right action means 1. to abstain from harmingsentient beings, especially to abstain from taking life (includingsuicide) and doing harm intentionally or delinquently, 2. to abstainfrom taking what is not given, which includes stealing, robbery, fraud,deceitfulness, and dishonesty, and 3. to abstain from sexualmisconduct. Positively formulated, right action means to act kindly andcompassionately, to be honest, to respect the belongings of others, andto keep sexual relationships harmless to others. Further detailsregarding the concrete meaning of right action can be found in the Precepts.

http://5. Right Livelihood

Right livelihood means that one should earn one's living in a righteous way and that wealth should be gained legally and peacefully. The Buddha mentions four specific activities that harm other beings and that one should avoid for this reason: 1. dealing in weapons, 2. dealing in living beings (including raising animals for slaughter as well as slave trade and prostitution), 3. working in meat production and butchery, and 4. selling intoxicants and poisons, such as alcohol and drugs. Furthermore any other occupation that would violate the principles of right speech and right action should be avoided.

http://6. Right Effort

Right effort can be seen as a prerequisite for the other principles of the path. Without effort, which is in itself an act of will, nothing can be achieved, whereas misguided effort distracts the mind from its task, and confusion will be the consequence. Mental energy is the force behind right effort; it can occur in either wholesome or unwholesome states. The same type of energy that fuels desire, envy, aggression, and violence can on the other side fuel self-discipline, honesty, benevolence, and kindness. Right effort is detailed in four types of endeavours that rank in ascending order of perfection: 1. to prevent the arising of unarisen unwholesome states, 2. to abandon unwholesome states that have already arisen, 3. to arouse wholesome states that have not yet arisen, and 4. to maintain and perfect wholesome states already arisen.

http://7. Right Mindfulness

Right mindfulness is the controlled and perfected faculty of cognition. It is the mental ability to see things as they are, with clear consciousness. Usually, the cognitive process begins with an impression induced by perception, or by a thought, but then it does not stay with the mere impression. Instead, we almost always conceptualise sense impressions and thoughts immediately. We interpret them and set them in relation to other thoughts and experiences, which naturally go beyond the facticity of the original impression. The mind then posits concepts, joins concepts into constructs, and weaves those constructs into complex interpretative schemes. All this happens only half consciously, and as a result we often see things obscured. Right mindfulness is anchored in clear perception and it penetrates impressions without getting carried away. Right mindfulness enables us to be aware of the process of conceptualisation in a way that we actively observe and control the way our thoughts go. Buddha accounted for this as the four foundations of mindfulness: 1. contemplation of the body, 2. contemplation of feeling (repulsive, attractive, or neutral), 3. contemplation of the state of mind, and 4. contemplation of the phenomena.

http://8. Right Concentration

Theeighth principle of the path, right concentration, refers to thedevelopment of a mental force that occurs in natural consciousness,although at a relatively low level of intensity, namely concentration.Concentration in this context is described as one-pointedness of mind,meaning a state where all mental faculties are unified and directedonto one particular object. Right concentration for the purpose of theeightfold path means wholesome concentration,i.e. concentration on wholesome thoughts and actions. The Buddhistmethod of choice to develop right concentration is through the practiceof meditation. The meditating mind focuses on a selected object. Itfirst directs itself onto it, then sustains concentration, and finallyintensifies concentration step by step. Through this practice itbecomes natural to apply elevated levels concentration also in everydaysituations.
 
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hey jrs why did you abandoned the knicks thread


and i do like to read stuff about zen, so this is interesting stuff to me. thanks for sharing
 
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Originally Posted by pr0phecy718

hey jrs why did you abandoned the knicks thread


and i do like to read stuff about zen, so this is interesting stuff to me. thanks for sharing
To be honest I've really abandoned the internet in general, but I just can't bring myself to that Knicks thread. I have nothing positive to add
 
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I'm surprised this thread is so dead, considering how enlightened the majority of Niketalk is and all.
 
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I've been fuxin wit this since '08. Got put up on game from my Arts of Asia course. You have to learn how to disconnect yourself from society/normal human behaviors and habits to really execute this though. I tried and for the most part succeeded in the fact that the way I perceive the world and my daily life has changed permanently. However, I understand that I am human and certain aspects of my life are within my own nature and embedded so deep within my personality and character that they may never become changeable. Regardless, it's just about finding inner-peace, understanding that you are an individual yet simultaneously you're also a single component in the interconnected grand scheme of EVERYTHING (as in the Universe itself along with everything in it; physical or non-physical)
 
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Originally Posted by FlyJr22

I've been fuxin wit this since '08. Got put up on game from my Arts of Asia course. You have to learn how to disconnect yourself from society/normal human behaviors and habits to really execute this though. I tried and for the most part succeeded in the fact that the way I perceive the world and my daily life has changed permanently. However, I understand that I am human and certain aspects of my life are within my own nature and embedded so deep within my personality and character that they may never become changeable. Regardless, it's just about finding inner-peace, understanding that you are an individual yet simultaneously you're also a single component in the interconnected grand scheme of EVERYTHING (as in the Universe itself along with everything in it; physical or non-physical)
That's awesome. How difficult was the disconnection part? Like what did you go through to achieve it? And since I'm really new to this, any chance you have any literature or websites or something that I could look into to better myself? Thanks.
 
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Originally Posted by JohnnyRedStorm

I'm surprised this thread is so dead, considering how enlightened the majority of Niketalk is and all.
"to abstain from harsh words that offend or hurt others, and 4. to abstain from idle chatter that lacks purpose or depth. Positively phrased, this means to tell the truth, to speak friendly, warm, and gently and to talk only when necessary."
 
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Originally Posted by Frankie Valentino

Originally Posted by JohnnyRedStorm

I'm surprised this thread is so dead, considering how enlightened the majority of Niketalk is and all.
"to abstain from harsh words that offend or hurt others, and 4. to abstain from idle chatter that lacks purpose or depth. Positively phrased, this means to tell the truth, to speak friendly, warm, and gently and to talk only when necessary."
As cold as my sarcasm may seem, it is always as warm as the sun. Besides, me posting is necessary to keep this thread active
 
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Originally Posted by the north west

I am a Theravada Buddhist

I also became a monk for a short period, which is customary in my culture
From your posts I have concluded that you are a terrible Buddhist. Haterrrrr.

But JRS, I have been looking into Buddhism for a long time. I feel like it's really the only religion/ lifestyle that makes any sort of sense to me. I'm looking into buying some books soon.
 
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I'm down with it... I want to learn Shaolin-do Kung Fu.... Any Kung Fu students in here?
 
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I'm confused why people are so quick to become Buddhists but shun away from Christianity.

If you go straight to the text, and not the commercialized version of Christianity, it's the same thing.

And Jesus is a pretty cool fellow.
 
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So what do you get for this religion?

...Do you get to fly when you die? Or have the power to shoot lightning bolts at people?
Or or...Do you get the power to be able to touch art in museums in your next life?
 
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Originally Posted by M1dnightMobster

I'm confused why people are so quick to become Buddhists but shun away from Christianity.

If you go straight to the text, and not the commercialized version of Christianity, it's the same thing.

And Jesus is a pretty cool fellow.
WOW.

Such a misinformed comment. You don't see the difference between practicing the principles of Buddhism and accepting Jesus as your personal savior? There is no Christianity without Christ.
 
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Originally Posted by an dee 51o

Originally Posted by the north west

I am a Theravada Buddhist

I also became a monk for a short period, which is customary in my culture
From your posts I have concluded that you are a terrible Buddhist. Haterrrrr.

But JRS, I have been looking into Buddhism for a long time. I feel like it's really the only religion/ lifestyle that makes any sort of sense to me. I'm looking into buying some books soon.
so you think I am a terrible Buddhist yet you are not even Buddhist yourself?

you think because you did some research online and took a couple classes you think you understand what Buddhism is all about?

you thinking there is such a thing as a "good" or "bad" Buddhist just shows how little you know about the religion itself

also Buddhism is not a lifestyle kid
 
70,199
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Originally Posted by an dee 51o

Originally Posted by the north west

I am a Theravada Buddhist

I also became a monk for a short period, which is customary in my culture
From your posts I have concluded that you are a terrible Buddhist. Haterrrrr.

But JRS, I have been looking into Buddhism for a long time. I feel like it's really the only religion/ lifestyle that makes any sort of sense to me. I'm looking into buying some books soon.
Word, let me know what books you come across.  I saw that Jack Kerouac wrote two books revolving around Buddha/Buddhism, I'm probably going to pick up one of them, Dharma Bums tomorrow if I get a chance to go to the bookstore.

I'm confused why people are so quick to become Buddhists but shun away from Christianity.

If you go straight to the text, and not the commercialized version of Christianity, it's the same thing.

And Jesus is a pretty cool fellow.
Yeah I know what you mean. I'm a Catholic always will be, I just really like the intuitive nature of Buddhism and what it's about.
 
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Originally Posted by the north west

So you think I am a terrible Buddhist yet you are not even Buddhist yourself?

you think because you did some research online and took a couple classes you think you understand what Buddhism is all about?

you thinking there is such a thing as a "good" or "bad" Buddhist just shows how little you know about the religion itself

also Buddhism is not a lifestyle kid
Ok, that was poorly phrased, but come on. All you do on this board is constantly belittle people and post condescending things. Look at your avy. I admit that I don't know everything about Buddhism, but everything I've read has said that it's generally about being decent.
 
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Originally Posted by an dee 51o

Originally Posted by the north west

So you think I am a terrible Buddhist yet you are not even Buddhist yourself?

you think because you did some research online and took a couple classes you think you understand what Buddhism is all about?

you thinking there is such a thing as a "good" or "bad" Buddhist just shows how little you know about the religion itself

also Buddhism is not a lifestyle kid
Ok, that was poorly phrased, but come on. All you do on this board is constantly belittle people and post condescending things. Look at your avy. I admit that I don't know everything about Buddhism, but everything I've read has said that it's generally about being decent.
I could care less bout what some kid thinks about me online

and to say that Buddhism is generally about being decent completely shows how misinformed you are about Buddhism

have you been to an actual temple before?

have you listened to any monks before?

have you read any scriptures before?
 
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Originally Posted by M1dnightMobster

I'm confused why people are so quick to become Buddhists but shun away from Christianity.

If you go straight to the text, and not the commercialized version of Christianity, it's the same thing.

And Jesus is a pretty cool fellow.
The reason is because the central part of Christianity is believing, without proof, in the super natural. To be Christian involves believing that not only is there a single, omnipotent creator, but that he impregnated a peasant woman and created a demi god son. Or to be Jewish you have to believe that a Tribal leader was given 613 laws or to be Muslim you ave to believe that God spoke through an an Arabian merchant and that those words were his final words on how to live.

To be a complete Buddhist you do have to have faith in a supernatural afterlife but it is not central to Buddhism. Buddhism is, at its heart, a philosophy, a critique of life, a mode of personal conduct. That is why you can be secular and still adopt many Buddhist ideas or you can worship other things and still be Buddhist as is the case with the Japanese who added Buddhism to their animistic Shinto faith.




  
 
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