Are there any Radiologist on NT? VOL. Respect my HIPPA

994
12
Joined Feb 3, 2004
Long story short, I had a tumor on my spinal cord that was removed in 06, and I got an MRI done today because I've been having some more neuro issues.  I was just wondering if there were any Radiologist, or Radiology students that I could exchange information with.  I have a few questions.

Of course a radiologist will read my films and have a report back next week, but I think I made a mistake by asking for copies of my films today.  I don't know what the hell I'm looking at or looking for, but what I'm looking at is kind of scary.


Appreciate it. 
 
994
12
Joined Feb 3, 2004
I just have the pictures as of now. I have previous reports but understand them clearly. I had something called Transverse Myelitis which caused an incomplete spinal cord injury. Six levels of my spine were inflamed and resulted in complete paralysis for 6 months, and it took 3 years for me to be able to walk with a walker. Unfortunately around that time I began to decline and that's when the doctors found the tumor.

The initial TM was idiopathic. They couldn't find out what the hell caused it to happen.

After the tumor was removed I got back on my feet and things pretty much stabilized. Walked across the stage last year to get my Bachelors Degree. I have a wood grain cane that I use more as a safety net. I don't even really need it.

I was on a roll, in great shape but about a year ago things began to decline. I'm still good, but we are just making sure nothing has returned, and I guess they are wanting to also see if I've developed MS.
 
994
12
Joined Feb 3, 2004
Originally Posted by AntonLaVey

Hmm hope you're ok
Walking, rolling or crawling I'll be straight...as long as I'm breathing.  Since my initial "attack" I've been paralyzed and regained the ability to move on 3 separate occasions.  It's rough, but I'm built for it, and still making moves in life.  Just doing what I gotta do to keep breathing.  I appreciate the well wishes though.

And since this is NT, and pics are always appreciated, have at it.

Warning, not for the faint of heart.

Spoiler [+]
 
 

ksteezy

Supporter
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Joined Dec 3, 2009
damn OP....best of luck to you, seems like you been put through the grinder...
 
994
12
Joined Feb 3, 2004
Well an update with some decent news. No tumor detected, but I'm going to get a separate opinion because I had other MRI's where the tumor was missed. My doctor is out of town for a week and the staff hasn't called me back so I went to get the report myself.

History: Malignant neoplasm of the spinal cord. Previous surgery.

Technique: All multisequence, multiplanar MR images of the thoracic spine are provided with and without contrast.

Findings: Laminectomies have been performed at T1-T3. Expected postsurgical changes are noted in the soft tissues at this level with a small area of T2 signal hyperintensity within the cord. This likely represents myelomalacia. This is not associated with abnormal enhancement or mass effect. No spinal cord mass is identified. No abnormal fluid collection is present is no evidence of epidural hemorrhage. Alignment is normal per the vertebral bodies are normal in height, Intervertebral disc are normal in size and signal characteristics. No foraminal narrowing is identified.

Impression:

Posterior decompression of T1-T3 with expected postsurgical changes. There is a small area of volume loss and T2 signal hyperintensity within the thoracic spinal cord at T2 which is felt to represent myelomalacia. Given the lack of mass effect or enhancement spinal cord tumor is felt unlikely.

There are some new things on this report that weren't on the previous, and if any of you could break this down I'd be forever obliged.

I'll be able to talk to the doctor next week and I just want to make sure I have everything understood when we speak.
 

antonlavey

Banned
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Joined Oct 13, 2008
Originally Posted by I AM KNOWLEDGE

Well an update with some decent news. No tumor detected, but I'm going to get a separate opinion because I had other MRI's where the tumor was missed. My doctor is out of town for a week and the staff hasn't called me back so I went to get the report myself.

History: Malignant neoplasm of the spinal cord. Previous surgery.

Technique: All multisequence, multiplanar MR images of the thoracic spine are provided with and without contrast.

Findings: Laminectomies have been performed at T1-T3. Expected postsurgical changes are noted in the soft tissues at this level with a small area of T2 signal hyperintensity within the cord. This likely represents myelomalacia. This is not associated with abnormal enhancement or mass effect. No spinal cord mass is identified. No abnormal fluid collection is present is no evidence of epidural hemorrhage. Alignment is normal per the vertebral bodies are normal in height, Intervertebral disc are normal in size and signal characteristics. No foraminal narrowing is identified.

Impression:

Posterior decompression of T1-T3 with expected postsurgical changes. There is a small area of volume loss and T2 signal hyperintensity within the thoracic spinal cord at T2 which is felt to represent myelomalacia. Given the lack of mass effect or enhancement spinal cord tumor is felt unlikely.

There are some new things on this report that weren't on the previous, and if any of you could break this down I'd be forever obliged.

I'll be able to talk to the doctor next week and I just want to make sure I have everything understood when we speak.
That's great news, made my day
 
4,843
215
Joined Apr 22, 2010
Originally Posted by I AM KNOWLEDGE

Long story short, I had a tumor on my spinal cord that was removed in 06, and I got an MRI done today because I've been having some more neuro issues.  I was just wondering if there were any Radiologist, or Radiology students that I could exchange information with.  I have a few questions.

Of course a radiologist will read my films and have a report back next week, but I think I made a mistake by asking for copies of my films today.  I don't know what the hell I'm looking at or looking for, but what I'm looking at is kind of scary.


Appreciate it. 

I'm not a Radiologist, but I've dealt with these types of patients before.

Usually with a tumor on the spinal cord it compresses the surrounding structures e.g. blood vessels and nerves. The tumor was most likely compressing blood vessels and would decrease the blood supply to the nerves, in which will kill the nerves due to the nutrition they need in order to regenerate and multiply.


Also, at what level was the tumor removed? Cervical, Thoracic, or Lumbar? And at what level was the SCI? Knowing this will help me out a little bit more even without seeing a report.
 
994
12
Joined Feb 3, 2004
Originally Posted by rashi

Originally Posted by I AM KNOWLEDGE

Long story short, I had a tumor on my spinal cord that was removed in 06, and I got an MRI done today because I've been having some more neuro issues.  I was just wondering if there were any Radiologist, or Radiology students that I could exchange information with.  I have a few questions.

Of course a radiologist will read my films and have a report back next week, but I think I made a mistake by asking for copies of my films today.  I don't know what the hell I'm looking at or looking for, but what I'm looking at is kind of scary.


Appreciate it. 

I'm not a Radiologist, but I've dealt with these types of patients before.

Usually with a tumor on the spinal cord it compresses the surrounding structures e.g. blood vessels and nerves. The tumor was most likely compressing blood vessels and would decrease the blood supply to the nerves, in which will kill the nerves due to the nutrition they need in order to regenerate and multiply.


Also, at what level was the tumor removed? Cervical, Thoracic, or Lumbar? And at what level was the SCI? Knowing this will help me out a little bit more even without seeing a report.
I'm going to shoot you a PM Rashi
 
4,843
215
Joined Apr 22, 2010
I'm just going to go through the report.

History: Malignant neoplasm of the spinal cord. Previous surgery.

Just stating you have a history of a tumor on your spinal cord.

Technique: All multisequence, multiplanar MR images of the thoracic spine are provided with and without contrast.


Type of technique used to perform MRI.

Findings: Laminectomies have been performed at T1-T3. Expected postsurgical changes are noted in the soft tissues at this level with a small area of T2 signal hyperintensity within the cord. This likely represents myelomalacia. This is not associated with abnormal enhancement or mass effect. No spinal cord mass is identified. No abnormal fluid collection is present is no evidence of epidural hemorrhage. Alignment is normal per the vertebral bodies are normal in height, Intervertebral disc are normal in size and signal characteristics. No foraminal narrowing is identified.


You had a fusion of the T1-T3 vertebrae with some soft tissue (muscle atrophy) at that level (which is common), myelomacia means narrowing of the spinal cord at T2 probably due to the decreased blood flow to the spinal cord at that level from the tumor compressing the blood vessels becoming necrotic (dead). No current lesions on the spinal cord. No abnormal findings of cerebral spinal fluid. Vertebrae alignment is normal, with vertebral discs intact. No narrowing of the vertebral foramen (hole), which if there was, would constitute a stenosis.


Impression:

Posterior decompression of T1-T3 with expected postsurgical changes. There is a small area of volume loss and T2 signal hyperintensity within the thoracic spinal cord at T2 which is felt to represent myelomalacia. Given the lack of mass effect or enhancement spinal cord tumor is felt unlikely

The spinal cord at the T2 level is very sensitive, the way I can compare this is like a nerve ending in your tooth being painful. No tumor present.


It's good to hear about your ambulation and strength, very positive! To hear about the dysernegia is common for someone who has/had a paralysis. I'm very pro Physical Therapy, I would recommend therapy with an emphasis on abdominal strength and pelvic stability. The paralysis has made the pelvic floor muscles weak, thus causing the dysernegia and probably cannot support those organs correctly.
 
994
12
Joined Feb 3, 2004
My man 


I've had years of physical therapy, but have been out for a significant amount of time.  I work out as much as I can.  Recently had a stress test done by my cardiologist because of an arrhythmia (not related to any of the neuro issues) and was able to reach and maintain my target heart rate).

However, most of my physical therapy was done in order to reach a basic level of independence.  And now I can do a lot more.  Definitely going to look into getting back into PT.  Going back to work cost me my state eligibility for health insurance, and while the truth is, my goal is to just earn my keep and not have to depend on a government hand out, I'm in the process of getting my insurance back.  There is a lot of red tape, and bureaucratic issues that one faces when he's trying to be self-sufficient, and I think the government needs to reconsider how they go about dealing with disabled citizens who want to work but still have significant health issues to address.  They do have certain buy-in programs strictly for the disabled but even the case-workers aren't knowledgeable about how they work.  It think they only work on paper.  Honestly, the government has helped me, but it's a damn headache.  I'll be glad when the day comes that I no longer need any assistance.

Hell, in today's society I can't afford being sick.

If Ron Paul supports stem-cell therapy I may really consider voting for him in 2012.  I know a decent amount about his other issues.

Thanks again
 
4,843
215
Joined Apr 22, 2010
No problem at all. I'm not a d-head, I'll always answers someones questions to the best of my ability, and if I don't know something I won't pretend to.


I would strongly encourage PT. I hear you about the red tape, I deal with it almost daily. I don't accept Medicare/Medicaid, and even thinking about eliminating insurance altogether. People are willing to pay cash (across socioeconomic circumstances), we provide quality care and service that people are willing to pay for. We negotiate prices for various procedures (varying from cortisone shots, xrays, to surgeries), it's easier to eliminate things that patients do not need.



I wish you the best of luck, and keep your head up. Good luck on those LSATs!

Listen, I have a close friend of mine that was in the Marines and he was on leave when he suffered a SCI at C4 or C5 (in 2005), he's currently a Incomplete Quadriplegic...he's also a U.S. paralympic team member, won Gold medals, holds numerous World Records.

Don't hesitate if you have any other questions, I'll try to answer them and give an opinion if need be.



Oh yeah. Ron Paul does support Stem Cell Research. Adult stem cells (which do work a whole lot better from research I've done)
 
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