ESPN insider Request: Which Veteran Should Evans Study

darthska

Staff member
33,416
12,011
Joined Apr 30, 2004
[table][tr][td]Tyreke Evans
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Sacramento Kings

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]LeBron James
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Cleveland Cavaliers

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No, Evans is not close to James in terms of talent -- who is? -- but they have a couple of things in common: (1) They both are big for their respective positions, and (2) they both have the ball in their hands all the time. This is where studying James can pay huge dividends for Evans and the Kings.

Right now when Evans dribbles, he's usually searching out ways to score himself. When James has the ball, however, he's looking for angles to help the Cavs score. This doesn't mean Evans is selfish; he's just young.

Evans must learn that by hunting the best shot for his team, he'll actually get better shots for himself. That's because help defenders will be slower to find him when forced to stay home and cover their own man or area. After all, James leads the league in scoring partially because defenders know he is more than willing to find the open man. So LeBron's teammates love playing with him even though he scores so much. If the Kings can learn to love playing with Evans in the same way, they'll become a much more dangerous team.
 
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Is Paul Pierce one of those options?


Not saying he should, but just have a hunch he would.
 
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[table][tr][td]Stephen Curry
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Golden State Warriors

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Steve Nash
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Phoenix Suns

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There is some irony to Nash's game, in that he mightbe the best shooter to ever play the game, yet he is most known for hispassing talents and overall ability to run a team. I think Curry can bemore like Nash than anyone we've ever seen.

What makes Nash soamazing is his ability to think "pass first" while always maintaininghis edge as a scorer; otherwise, defenders could play him for the passand make him less effective as a scorer because of it. This is theessence of what Curry needs to master. He's always going to be a strongscorer and a great shooter, yet he has the ability to be a fun guy toplay with thanks to his vision and intelligence in reading defenders.Balancing those two things is tough, though. Nash helps himself a lotby doing things on and off the court to show his teammates that he'sthinking of them. So when he scores 30 points in a game, his teammateswill know he did it because the defense forced him to and not forselfish reasons. He'll also be sure to hand out lots of assists in thenext game or two (check out his game log; it's astounding).

Currywill be toughest to guard when he's thinking "score" and "pass"simultaneously, basically reading the defense while prepared to doeither. Sometimes, Nash will pass even if shooting is the betterchoice, because this is a team game and a point guard often mustsacrifice something for the long-term mental health of the team. It's alesson that would benefit Curry a great deal.
 
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Originally Posted by Osh Kosh Bosh

I'm going to guess Curry is Nash, that's who he reminds me of the most.
Thats what a lot of Bay area people think also.  Hit the nail on the head
 

darthska

Staff member
33,416
12,011
Joined Apr 30, 2004
[table][tr][td]Darren Collison
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]New Orleans Hornets

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Chris Paul
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]New Orleans Hornets

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Collison came into the league ready to play in many respects. I've noticed that UCLA point guards generally know how to control tempo and rarely play too fast. But what happens when the team's best style of play is fast? Well, Collison's high turnover rate -- currently tied for 58th out of 66 players among point guards -- suggests he still has a lot to learn.

Fortunately for Collison, his teammate is Chris Paul, who is the master at controlling a game, whether it's fast or slow. Paul rarely dribbles at full speed when leading the break. Rather, he pushes at a good pace while constantly reading the action -- something that's hard to do when running at top speed.

Here is the analogy I use when teaching young NBA players about playing fast: Imagine driving on a freeway knowing you have to exit soon but you're unsure of where that exit is. Do you drive in the left lane at 90 mph? Or do you stay in the middle lane and drive at the speed limit so you have both the time and ability to change lanes smoothly once you see which side the exit is on? It's a lesson that will serve Collison well, and Professor Paul is the man best suited to teach him.
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[table][tr][td]Brandon Jennings
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Milwaukee Bucks

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Chauncey Billups
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Denver Nuggets

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These guys do not have similar games, obviously. But playing point guard in the NBA is as cerebral as it is physical. Here is where I see some real potential in Jennings. He has the stuff to be an outstanding leader, if he so chooses.
Billups is the true master of the court, and he carries himself as such at all times, from practices to games. Although he is bigger than Jennings, it's not size that establishes leadership; it's having the will to do what is necessary for the ballclub. Jennings has the inner confidence and the game to control a team and the court. It also helps that his coach believes in him
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[table][tr][td]Ty Lawson
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Denver Nuggets

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Andre Miller
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Portland Trail Blazers

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Lawson, like Hornets rookie Marcus Thornton, is already a pretty complete NBA player. But I think he can learn from Miller, who once ran Denver's offense to perfection. Miller is still perhaps the best hit-ahead passer in basketball and an expert at using his body to create scoring or passing angles. Lawson might be smaller, but he can learn the tricks of the point guard trade from this wily vet.

He can also study how Miller's teammates love playing with him; his quirky disposition has grown on the Blazers. Lawson has similar potential in this area as well, once he begins to assert his own personality on the team.
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[table][tr][td]Marcus Thornton
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]New Orleans Hornets

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Jason Terry
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Dallas Mavericks

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I struggled to find an appropriate veteran for Thornton to follow, for one simple reason: He's already better than most veterans who play like he plays. I remember his agent telling everyone last summer that Thornton was the most NBA-ready shooting guard in the draft, and his agent was right. It's fair to wonder how much better Thornton can get, considering he has played four years of college, already shoots 40 percent from 3 and is efficient overall (17.78 PER). He's not going to suddenly get taller, pass much better than he already does or grow any more fearless than he already is.

So how does a guy with such a mature game model himself after someone else? Well, by looking at Terry's attitude. A small 2 who has always been able to score in bunches, Terry has had to fight this question his whole career: "Is he starter quality or better off the bench?" And Terry answers it by just kicking butt year after year. As a starter or reserve, he helps his team win games, period.

If Thornton ever gets frustrated with answering that same question, he just needs to gain strength from what Terry does in Dallas. Then go knock down some more shots.
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[table][tr][td]DeJuan Blair
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]San Antonio Spurs

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Dirk Nowitzki
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Dallas Mavericks

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One of the most unique players in the NBA, Blair consistently makes plays on the glass and in the scoring department that few undersized power forwards can. What he can't do, however, is shoot. But as anyone who has been in the gym with him can attest, never tell Blair he can't do something.

So if he wants to learn how to shoot, who better to watch than the best 7-foot shooter of all time, Dirk? Blair does not have to copy the mechanics of Dirk's shot; in fact, he should stick to the form that feels most natural for him. But he can study what makes Dirk's shot so sweet: The repeatable stroke, the strong follow-through, the high trajectory and the use of fakes to create space.

That last part might be the best thing for Blair to learn -- because once he starts to make shots consistently, a strong shot-fake game can make Blair a far more devastating offensive player; he already has the quickness to get by people. Imagine how tough it would be stop him if he were a threat to drive, shoot or shot-fake attack.
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[table][tr][td]James Harden
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Oklahoma City Thunder

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Josh Smith
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Atlanta Hawks

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When you get a new car, have you noticed how you suddenly see a lot of other people driving the same model? That's because you're subconsciously looking for it. So how can Josh Smith help Harden? Easy. Harden is deeply skilled and smart, but he's not a guy who makes athletic plays, partly because he rarely sees them coming. Conversely, Smith views almost every play as an opportunity to show off his wondrous hops. For example: If a shot bounces off the offensive glass, Harden will jump to get it, land, then jump back up to lay it in. Smith, on the other hand, will take that exact same rebound and dunk it explosively.

Sure, Smith can jump higher and is longer, but Harden is certainly capable of getting more dunks (or blocked shots, explosive finishes, etc.) than he does now. Even if he jumped better, he would first have to see those opportunities. Watching Smith play is the best way to see the athletic opportunities available in games.
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[table][tr][td]Jonas Jerebko
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Detroit Pistons

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Ron Artest
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Los Angeles Lakers

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It might seem like an odd pairing, but it will make perfect sense. Jerebko has the stuff to be a real pain in the butt to go up against -- all arms and elbows and a red-hot engine that never stops. Great teams always seem to have one guy who fires up his own team while punishing opponents with both mental and physical play.

Artest is not the player he once was (I'd want Jerebko to pull out some classic game film of Artest and maybe even get into some '90s Dennis Rodman footage), but he'll show Jerebko enough to help him reach another level on defense and the boards. No, I don't want Jerebko to look at Artest's shot selection -- just his ability to get under the skin of his opponents using his length, physicality and bone-crushing attitude.
 
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Dude, again?

[table][tr][td]Darren Collison
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]New Orleans Hornets

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Chris Paul
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]New Orleans Hornets

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Collison came into the league ready to play in many respects. I've noticed that UCLA point guards generally know how to control tempo and rarely play too fast. But what happens when the team's best style of play is fast? Well, Collison's high turnover rate -- currently tied for 58th out of 66 players among point guards -- suggests he still has a lot to learn.

Fortunately for Collison, his teammate is Chris Paul, who is the master at controlling a game, whether it's fast or slow. Paul rarely dribbles at full speed when leading the break. Rather, he pushes at a good pace while constantly reading the action -- something that's hard to do when running at top speed.

Here is the analogy I use when teaching young NBA players about playing fast: Imagine driving on a freeway knowing you have to exit soon but you're unsure of where that exit is. Do you drive in the left lane at 90 mph? Or do you stay in the middle lane and drive at the speed limit so you have both the time and ability to change lanes smoothly once you see which side the exit is on? It's a lesson that will serve Collison well, and Professor Paul is the man best suited to teach him.
[table][tr][td]Brandon Jennings
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Milwaukee Bucks

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Chauncey Billups
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Denver Nuggets

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These guys do not have similar games, obviously. But playing point guard in the NBA is as cerebral as it is physical. Here is where I see some real potential in Jennings. He has the stuff to be an outstanding leader, if he so chooses.

Billups is the true master of the court, and he carries himself as such at all times, from practices to games. Although he is bigger than Jennings, it's not size that establishes leadership; it's having the will to do what is necessary for the ballclub. Jennings has the inner confidence and the game to control a team and the court. It also helps that his coach believes in him.

Few rookie point guards help lead their teams to the playoffs, so if the Bucks can maintain their current level of play, Jennings will have earned enormous credit. And he can use that credit to take his leadership level to new heights, just as Billups did when he first led the Pistons to the title in 2004.
[table][tr][td]Ty Lawson
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Denver Nuggets

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Andre Miller
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Portland Trail Blazers

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Lawson, like Hornets rookie Marcus Thornton, is already a pretty complete NBA player. But I think he can learn from Miller, who once ran Denver's offense to perfection. Miller is still perhaps the best hit-ahead passer in basketball and an expert at using his body to create scoring or passing angles. Lawson might be smaller, but he can learn the tricks of the point guard trade from this wily vet.

He can also study how Miller's teammates love playing with him; his quirky disposition has grown on the Blazers. Lawson has similar potential in this area as well, once he begins to assert his own personality on the team.
[table][tr][td]Marcus Thornton
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]New Orleans Hornets

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Jason Terry
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Dallas Mavericks

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I struggled to find an appropriate veteran for Thornton to follow, for one simple reason: He's already better than most veterans who play like he plays. I remember his agent telling everyone last summer that Thornton was the most NBA-ready shooting guard in the draft, and his agent was right. It's fair to wonder how much better Thornton can get, considering he has played four years of college, already shoots 40 percent from 3 and is efficient overall (17.78 PER). He's not going to suddenly get taller, pass much better than he already does or grow any more fearless than he already is.

So how does a guy with such a mature game model himself after someone else? Well, by looking at Terry's attitude. A small 2 who has always been able to score in bunches, Terry has had to fight this question his whole career: "Is he starter quality or better off the bench?" And Terry answers it by just kicking butt year after year. As a starter or reserve, he helps his team win games, period.

If Thornton ever gets frustrated with answering that same question, he just needs to gain strength from what Terry does in Dallas. Then go knock down some more shots.
[table][tr][td]DeJuan Blair
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]San Antonio Spurs

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Dirk Nowitzki
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Dallas Mavericks

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One of the most unique players in the NBA, Blair consistently makes plays on the glass and in the scoring department that few undersized power forwards can. What he can't do, however, is shoot. But as anyone who has been in the gym with him can attest, never tell Blair he can't do something.

So if he wants to learn how to shoot, who better to watch than the best 7-foot shooter of all time, Dirk? Blair does not have to copy the mechanics of Dirk's shot; in fact, he should stick to the form that feels most natural for him. But he can study what makes Dirk's shot so sweet: The repeatable stroke, the strong follow-through, the high trajectory and the use of fakes to create space.

That last part might be the best thing for Blair to learn -- because once he starts to make shots consistently, a strong shot-fake game can make Blair a far more devastating offensive player; he already has the quickness to get by people. Imagine how tough it would be stop him if he were a threat to drive, shoot or shot-fake attack.
[table][tr][td]James Harden
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Oklahoma City Thunder

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Josh Smith
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Atlanta Hawks

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When you get a new car, have you noticed how you suddenly see a lot of other people driving the same model? That's because you're subconsciously looking for it. So how can Josh Smith help Harden? Easy. Harden is deeply skilled and smart, but he's not a guy who makes athletic plays, partly because he rarely sees them coming. Conversely, Smith views almost every play as an opportunity to show off his wondrous hops. For example: If a shot bounces off the offensive glass, Harden will jump to get it, land, then jump back up to lay it in. Smith, on the other hand, will take that exact same rebound and dunk it explosively.

Sure, Smith can jump higher and is longer, but Harden is certainly capable of getting more dunks (or blocked shots, explosive finishes, etc.) than he does now. Even if he jumped better, he would first have to see those opportunities. Watching Smith play is the best way to see the athletic opportunities available in games.
[table][tr][td]Jonas Jerebko
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Detroit Pistons

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Ron Artest
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Los Angeles Lakers

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It might seem like an odd pairing, but it will make perfect sense. Jerebko has the stuff to be a real pain in the butt to go up against -- all arms and elbows and a red-hot engine that never stops. Great teams always seem to have one guy who fires up his own team while punishing opponents with both mental and physical play.

Artest is not the player he once was (I'd want Jerebko to pull out some classic game film of Artest and maybe even get into some '90s Dennis Rodman footage), but he'll show Jerebko enough to help him reach another level on defense and the boards. No, I don't want Jerebko to look at Artest's shot selection -- just his ability to get under the skin of his opponents using his length, physicality and bone-crushing attitude.
[table][tr][td]Jonny Flynn
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Minnesota Timberwolves

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Jason Kidd
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Dallas Mavericks

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The other night, Flynn turned down a breakaway layup and passed the ball to a hard-charging wing player for the easy dunk instead. It marked one of the only times all season that Flynn thought to set up a teammate rather than take the shot himself on the break. And I smiled (as did the teammate who got the easy dunk).

Flynn is a very gifted player, and he is going to be an excellent scorer in this league. But to play in Minnesota's offense, he needs to understand his role as a passer and shot creator for his teammates. I don't think he's a selfish player, but he definitely thinks about scoring first. Among starting point guards, he ranks in the bottom five in assist rate. Want to guess who's No. 1 in that category? Kidd, by a landslide. He gets an assist on almost half of his overall possessions. When you watch him play, you can almost read his eyes and mind as he searches for open teammates.

I think Flynn can improve enormously if he learns to think like this more often. As evidenced by his unselfish pass the other night, perhaps it's something he has already become aware of. He was not making that pass earlier this season.
[table][tr][td]Taj Gibson
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Chicago Bulls

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Chris Bosh
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Toronto Raptors

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One of the steals of the draft, Gibson is a long, athletic big who competes hard. But to take another step up, he has to learn how to use his quickness better than he does now. Bosh is a big guy who's an expert at going from 0 to 60 really quickly, making him a tough cover in isolation, especially because he can beat his man in either direction.

Gibson has excellent quickness, but is not ready to play any isolation games. Learning to stay low in triple-threat position, always with an eye on shooting or driving, is the key to being a matchup problem for bigger, slower guys. Bosh is terrific at this part of the game.
[table][tr][td][font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Houston Rockets

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Ray Allen
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Boston Celtics

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At the very least, Budinger can be an athletic player in transition who can shoot decently from 3. So, he already has a place in this league. But I also see him as a guy who can learn to utilize screens effectively to get off his shot, since he has great size and ups for his position. Allen is one of the masters at this, and has been for a long time. He's not the player he used to be, but he still knows how to use screens expertly. Changing speeds, running misdirections, setting his man up -- all part of his arsenal. This is a real growth opportunity for Budinger.

I also like how Allen has grown in his willingness as a defender. The more Budinger buys into the defensive end of the floor, the better chance he has of earning more rotation minutes at one of the wing spots in Houston.
[table][tr][td]Terrence Williams
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]New Jersey Nets

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Courtney Lee
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]New Jersey Nets

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Think about this: Last season, Lee started in the NBA Finals, had a defined role on a team with a strong coach, and played for an organization set to contend for the next several years. Then he was traded to the Nets, an organization dealing with vast changes and one that could wind up having the worst record in NBA history.

He started the season poorly, but has recovered to play excellent basketball, displaying great intensity on defense even after a game has been decided. And through it all, he has never said a negative word to anyone. A Nets official raved to me recently about how nice it was to see a young player ooze that much class and professionalism.

Williams is proving to be a huge talent on the court. I absolutely understand why the Nets drafted him. And perhaps his recent improvement stems from his own realization that his lack of focus was on him and him alone. If he learns to eliminate the distractions, play his role, and lock in on the job at hand, he can be a devastating force on both ends. He is lucky to have the perfect role model right next to him.
[table][tr][td]Jrue Holiday
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Philadelphia 76ers

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Deron Williams
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Utah Jazz

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At the pre-draft camp in Chicago last year, I received a number of texts from NBA scouts and executives (and one from Chad Ford) that all said basically this: Holiday looked like a power forward when all the point guards were put together. And he was still 18 years old at the time. Now that he's starting for the Sixers, we see Holiday's frame and strength do give him advantages at his position. However, he's far from being ready to use those advantages like a hammer the way Williams does.

Guarding Williams in Utah's screening-heavy offense is difficult because the defender has to fight both the screens and Williams' size in the paint. And Williams knows it. He pounds the typically smaller opponents like it's a position mismatch, finishing shots inside at 63 percent, with 40 percent of those shots being assisted. Both numbers are extremely high for a point guard. Holiday has the same kind of upside to his game.
[table][tr][td]DeMar DeRozan
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Toronto Raptors

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Anthony Morrow
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Golden State Warriors

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The obvious reason for this pairing is that DD is not at all a shooter, despite playing a position that requires the ability to shoot. And, over the past two seasons, Morrow has probably been the league's best 3-point shooter. So DeRozan can watch how Morrow gets himself open for shots and study his sweet stroke. However, DeRozan would also be wise to learn of Morrow's path to the NBA.

DeRozan has always been a stellar athlete who garnered lots of attention as an NBA prospect even when he wasn't producing much, and became a top-10 NBA pick. Morrow, on the other hand, toiled for four years at Georgia Tech, where he manufactured an impressive career as an all-around player and great shooter, but still went undrafted. With something to prove, Morrow showcased his talent and hunger in his first summer-league appearances in Orlando. And the rest is history. Morrow is a producer, plain and simple.

DeRozan shows flashes of a strong game, but it comes and goes. At some point, he'll have to produce in a consistent way and play with intensity every night. Like Anthony Morrow.
[table][tr][td]Jordan Hill
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Houston Rockets

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Joakim Noah
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Chicago Bulls

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I like this pairing for two reasons. The first has to do with the fact that both guys didn't get their NBA careers off to good starts. Now, Noah projects to be an All-Star candidate for years to come, which should give hope to Hill, who is starting to show some real talent in Houston. And that's where the second part of this pairing kicks in.

One thing that makes Noah so special is that he knows exactly who he is and what he's capable of doing, almost never hunting shots or doing anything selfishly. Instead, he is a machine that runs hot at all times and reminds me of "The Terminator." His sole purpose on the basketball court is to help his team win, and he does so by competing at top speed every second he's on the court -- a coach's dream.

Hill is a large, long, agile guy who is only going to get stronger. Without getting a single play called for him, he can affect a game in numerous ways. But only if he competes with passion and purpose, which he's doing for the most part now. If he can take his intensity up a notch, and bring it in every practice and game, he'll be a good starting big for years.
[table][tr][td]Omri Casspi
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Sacramento Kings

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Hedo Turkoglu
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Toronto Raptors

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This is one of the few pairings in which the rookie could help the veteran just as much as the other way around. Imagine Hedo as a giant energy guy!

Casspi, who sees the floor very well, has the agility and fluidity to become a better player with the ball in his hands. If he can learn to control the ball in pick-and-roll situations -- hitting shots when the defender goes under screens or turning the corner and finishing down the middle, all while finding the open man if the defense takes his other options away -- he'll be a perfect complement to Tyreke Evans.

Most experts would say Turkoglu is one of the best pick-and-roll small forwards in the league. His size and shot-creation skills make it hard to stop him from scoring on down-the-lane drives, and he makes easy passes to open teammates when defenses jam him in the paint. Always under control and reading the other nine guys on the floor, he's clearly a product of good coaching and teaching. Casspi is capable of adding this to his game soon.
[table][tr][td]Hasheem Thabeet
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]Memphis Grizzlies

[/font][/td][td][/td][td]Tim Duncan
[font=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif]San Antonio Spurs

[/font][/td][/tr][tr][td]
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For young players, it's often best to build their foundation beginning with one skill at a time. For Thabeet, who absolutely has a chance to be an impact player in this league, that skill obviously should be shot-blocking. He's already shown immense talent in this area, averaging more than five blocks per 48 minutes. Now, imagine for a moment that Duncan was 7-foot-3. How many blocks per 48 minutes do you think he would average?

Duncan is a master at using angles to get blocks or put scorers in bad spots so they have tougher finishes. And he's still one of the league's best at blocking shots without fouling. Dwight Howard is marvelous in this area, too, but Thabeet would be wise to study the Big Fundamental's footwork and strategies in dominating the paint. While he's at it, watching Duncan employ his craft as a rebounder would pay big dividends, too.
 

darthska

Staff member
33,416
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Joined Apr 30, 2004
There, that rounds out the first half of the comparisons.

Proshares, care to jump in?


*edit* Well damn.
 
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I didn't even attempt to read any of them when he had Thabeet studying Duncan. Judging that this article was written by David Thorpe, I would not take much credence on what he writes. Most of his chat wraps are with one sentence, and often, one word answers and he rarely goes into details about anything. I just ignore everything he does and in my opinion he's one of the worst insiders with ESPN compared to Chad Ford and Marc Stein and the rest of the crew.
 
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Some of them seemed nice. Others, not really.



i love how ska only picked a few that actually made sense
 
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Thabeet and TD huh?
, okay...

Harden and Smith? Really?
I don't see it.

Blair and Dirk? What the hell is this guy smoking?

Most of these are really kind of a stretch.

I must give it up to Marcus Thornton though, that kid can flat out play. I didn't see it coming.
 
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If Hill can keep the hustle game going he could be a nice asset to the Rox or any team in the future
 
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