For All Of You Sandwich Dudes: " sandwich architecture "

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Found this on: http://www.operationsport...em-2.html#post2040217576

More on sandwich architecture... not specific to tuna, but totally applicable to these. RAZR asked about it and I wrote this big thing, so I figured I'd share for my fellow "hard to eat, poorly-built, falling-apart sandwich" haters.

Well the key when I say "sandwich architecture" is to make it so things don't fall out of the sandwich when you bite it as well as keeping everything tasting its best (bread toasted and crispy, lettuce holding its place, tomatoes not dripping all over the place, etc.). So for example, you don't want tomatoes on top of cheese because the moisture will make it slippery and the cheese will let it drip right out of the sandwich onto your shirt. My normal sandwich goes like this (think as if you're looking at it straight ahead):

Bread
Mayo/spread
Lettuce/Spinach
Onions
Cheese
Meat/Main Ingredient
Tomatoes
Mayo/Spread
Bread

So basically, you always want the spread (fat-heavy spreads like mayo are the best for this) as a moisture barrier for the bread, especially if you're toasting it or taking a sandwich to work or something where it's sitting for 2+ hours. Then you also don't want slimy/juicy ingredients like tomatoes sitting on top of the cheese where all the juice drips out when you bite it -- the example above uses gravity to keep all the tomato goo contained via the mayo and the bread below it, which will soak a bit of it up. Also, having the spinach/lettuce touching the sandwich spread makes for a better-tasting and more sturdy sandwich because there aren't dry lettuce pieces that fall out because they have nothing to stick to.

If you're making a sub-style sandwich on a crusty loaf of bread (think baguettes/Italian bread), then it's a good idea to hollow out the soft part of the bread a bit to serve as a holding place for the toppings. With crusty bread, sandwiches often fall apart when you bite them just because there's nowhere for the ingredients to go... hollowing out the bread a bit and then wrapping the sandwich tightly in plastic wrap and letting it sit for 30 mins or so will hold everything together perfectly.

And for god's sake, season your sandwiches... people always forget that some simple salt/pepper or some dried herbs will make ANY sandwich taste better. Try throwing some nice kosher/sea salt on a PBJ and notice how much better everything tastes (jelly seems sweeter, more flavors come out of the peanut butter)... salt is your friend.
 
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think ima make me one right now
 
I would never think to put salt on a PB&J.....doesn't even sound right. I might have to try it tho. And the way he broke down the "architecturaldesign" of a sandwich is
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, made me hungry a little bit. I put a pickle slice on my sandwiches tho, wish he woulda included that.
 

And for god's sake, season your sandwiches... people always forget that some simple salt/pepper or some dried herbs will make ANY sandwich taste better. Try throwing some nice kosher/sea salt on a PBJ and notice how much better everything tastes (jelly seems sweeter, more flavors come out of the peanut butter)... salt is your friend.
Craftsy
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laugh.gif
.
 
Originally Posted by DCAllAmerican

Found this on: http://www.operationsport...em-2.html#post2040217576

More on sandwich architecture... not specific to tuna, but totally applicable to these. RAZR asked about it and I wrote this big thing, so I figured I'd share for my fellow "hard to eat, poorly-built, falling-apart sandwich" haters.

Well the key when I say "sandwich architecture" is to make it so things don't fall out of the sandwich when you bite it as well as keeping everything tasting its best (bread toasted and crispy, lettuce holding its place, tomatoes not dripping all over the place, etc.). So for example, you don't want tomatoes on top of cheese because the moisture will make it slippery and the cheese will let it drip right out of the sandwich onto your shirt. My normal sandwich goes like this (think as if you're looking at it straight ahead):

Bread
Mayo/spread
Lettuce/Spinach
Onions
Cheese
Meat/Main Ingredient
Tomatoes
Mayo/Spread
Bread

So basically, you always want the spread (fat-heavy spreads like mayo are the best for this) as a moisture barrier for the bread, especially if you're toasting it or taking a sandwich to work or something where it's sitting for 2+ hours. Then you also don't want slimy/juicy ingredients like tomatoes sitting on top of the cheese where all the juice drips out when you bite it -- the example above uses gravity to keep all the tomato goo contained via the mayo and the bread below it, which will soak a bit of it up. Also, having the spinach/lettuce touching the sandwich spread makes for a better-tasting and more sturdy sandwich because there aren't dry lettuce pieces that fall out because they have nothing to stick to.

If you're making a sub-style sandwich on a crusty loaf of bread (think baguettes/Italian bread), then it's a good idea to hollow out the soft part of the bread a bit to serve as a holding place for the toppings. With crusty bread, sandwiches often fall apart when you bite them just because there's nowhere for the ingredients to go... hollowing out the bread a bit and then wrapping the sandwich tightly in plastic wrap and letting it sit for 30 mins or so will hold everything together perfectly.

And for god's sake, season your sandwiches... people always forget that some simple salt/pepper or some dried herbs will make ANY sandwich taste better. Try throwing some nice kosher/sea salt on a PBJ and notice how much better everything tastes (jelly seems sweeter, more flavors come out of the peanut butter)... salt is your friend.


Really? That's something I've never thought of...
 
When my girl makes me sammiches she always puts some salt and cracked pepper on there.

It really does make a big difference.
 
Definitely going to start putting salt and pepper on sandwiches.

Mine usually goes

bread
spread
pickle
lettuce
tomato
cheese
meat
bread
 
i thought this was common knowledge...learned about seasoning sandwiches from my pops at a young age. always got the salt and pepper on there. Sea Salt iscrack but my new ++*%....Bacon Salt....
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J_D_s_Bacon_Salt_Sampler___3_Packp2iDetail.jpg


not pictured is the best....Cheddar flavored
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Originally Posted by SylvesterMcGrizzly

i thought this was common knowledge...learned about seasoning sandwiches from my pops at a young age. always got the salt and pepper on there. Sea Salt is crack but my new ++*%....Bacon Salt....
pimp.gif



J_D_s_Bacon_Salt_Sampler___3_Packp2iDetail.jpg


not pictured is the best....Cheddar flavored
pimp.gif
This man knows wassup
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Bacon Salt is whats up, but you gotta be careful, its easy to OD and overpower the food you put it on.
 
goin to my friends bday celebration on sat... bout to try a cuban sandwich for the first time...
 
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Originally Posted by DCAllAmerican

Bacon Salt? Never heard of that

It's a double-edged sword. The right amount can change a sandwich... too much can make it uneatable.
 
Good thread.
I almost always put a little bit of seasoning on my sandwiches.
Salt, pepper, garlic powder, italian seasoning...depending on what I have handy.
 
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