Friend wrote a letter to PROF. after internship at UBS

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Spoke the truth. His teacher replied back that he has never witness something like this and that he wished ppl were more honest like him.

UBS

Unfortunately, as can be seen from my internship reports, Ididn't learn much about finance from the internship. Although we were told from the beginning that most of the work would be office work, we didn'trealize it would be so dull and repetitive. As I later learned by talking to other students who had previous experiences with other internships, this was oneof the worst they have had. While they admitted that in almost all of the other internships they were told in the beginning they'd be "doing officework" as well, eventually most of them helped with research or received some other serious assignment, at least something relevant to finance. That wasnot the case at UBS. To summarize a day's work; copy, fax, file, print, mail, bind, run back and forth, replace paper/printer cartridges, get mail, createexcel spreadsheet(s). I don't think four years of college are necessary for this.

The internship was very valuable, I'd say. It wasvaluable in the sense that, after seeing what goes on in a major branch of a major financial company, I'm debating whether I made the right choice byselecting finance as my major, or going into business in general. True, this was only a small piece of the puzzle, but it was still an experience. I guessI'm glad that I did it before getting a full time job in a similar environment. And if I was offered a full time job right after the internship, I probablywould've taken it. But now that I had time to think about it, things seem different. I don't know if I'm ready to give up my life for $55K/year ina cubicle or office. It made me reconsider all those things I wanted to do as a kid that kind of just faded away as I grew up, as I tried to be more mature and"act my age," as everyone told me to do.

I would definitely recommend this to other students, not because they will gain valuableknowledge, but because they might realize that finance isn't their thing and pursue the dreams. When asked in elementary school the popular question,"what do you want to be when you grow up?" I don't think many people answered "certified financial planner or charted financialadvisor." If 5 years from now you see me flying a navy jet or driving a formula one car, you know what made mechange my mind.
 
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Eh. A horrific experience could be a lot more valuable than a merely good experience.

Anyways, interesting read.
 
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Internships are part of the reason I switched from Architecture to Business Management...curriculum and evaluation methods were others
 
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I'm pretty sure that's how most people with those type of jobs feel...just aren't saying it out loud like that
 
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I know people who interned at Goldman who said the same thing. Luckily for me, I had a internship where I was actually allowed to do what I was going into.
 
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Its not even just internships. First year "analysts" can feel the same. Basically, they've often treated it as a "rites of passage"type environment. I had friends go through it and even read about it in Liar's Poker.

Its really the luck of the draw.
 
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you gotta put in "work" to get paid.


I did see his point tho and thats why I dont want to work in the corporate environment again
 
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That sucks but at least he knows what it's like. However, I think he should continue doing this because he will eventually get the chance to do the realfinance stuff.
 
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great read. that's why it's important to get an internship in some cases. that way you can prepare for the "what if" situations
 
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this is my outlook on corporate america in general after interning with a large corporate company.

from a macro perspective its just a bunch of bs and i cant get over working for another man disguised as a "company" knowing there is downwardpressure and that we are all minions working for relatively cheap labor and having the wool placed over our eyes by being assigned "hard work" thateveryone says "pays off"

i have such a horrible image of corporate america and i cannot shake it for anything as hard as i try
 
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Originally Posted by bonafide hustla

i have such a horrible image of corporate america and i cannot shake it for anything as hard as i try
you shouldn't. corporate america is just another fraud in the grand scheme of things.

i've done a couple internships and a majority of it was employees using the interns to get off easy. it wasn't enjoyable and at the end of my 2ndinternship i popped off and that was all she wrote.

perfect example is in the beginning of the matrix with 'thomas anderson' and his boss.
 

ricekrispies420

formerly l2icel3oi9i6
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nice, i enjoyed reading it. im in that same position but not about finance..im debating whether to follow "what i want to be when i grow up" or dosomething that im good at and would make good pay although i wouldnt enjoy it a lot.
 
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Originally Posted by xxxoverridexxx


I don't think four years of college are necessary for this.
O rly?
I think companies like college degrees because its proof that you can be wrangled into a classroom, listen to the same material that the last herd was told,stand in single file line waiting for your reward patiently.
Why would they want an entrepreneur willing to realize what he's actually worth?
Originally Posted by Twig1026

I'm pretty sure that's how most people with those type of jobs feel...just aren't saying it out loud like that
Then their lives wouldn't sound special anymore. I like when people say things like, "I manage high profile accounts" then you gototheir job and realize the only time they see fortune 500 companies is on the letterheads of papers they file
 
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Well, I start my internship on Tuesday.

Hopefully, I will have an amazing experience, which I know I will. I have dreamed of working for a corporation for ages. Hopefully, I can make something of theexperience.
 
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Originally Posted by xxxoverridexxx


Spoke the truth. His teacher replied back that he has never witness something like this and that he wished ppl were more honest like him.

UBS

Unfortunately, as can be seen from my internship reports, I didn't learn much about finance from the internship. Although we were told from the beginning that most of the work would be office work, we didn't realize it would be so dull and repetitive. As I later learned by talking to other students who had previous experiences with other internships, this was one of the worst they have had. While they admitted that in almost all of the other internships they were told in the beginning they'd be "doing office work" as well, eventually most of them helped with research or received some other serious assignment, at least something relevant to finance. That was not the case at UBS. To summarize a day's work; copy, fax, file, print, mail, bind, run back and forth, replace paper/printer cartridges, get mail, create excel spreadsheet(s). I don't think four years of college are necessary for this.

The internship was very valuable, I'd say. It was valuable in the sense that, after seeing what goes on in a major branch of a major financial company, I'm debating whether I made the right choice by selecting finance as my major, or going into business in general. True, this was only a small piece of the puzzle, but it was still an experience. I guess I'm glad that I did it before getting a full time job in a similar environment. And if I was offered a full time job right after the internship, I probably would've taken it. But now that I had time to think about it, things seem different. I don't know if I'm ready to give up my life for $55K/year in a cubicle or office. It made me reconsider all those things I wanted to do as a kid that kind of just faded away as I grew up, as I tried to be more mature and "act my age," as everyone told me to do.

I would definitely recommend this to other students, not because they will gain valuable knowledge, but because they might realize that finance isn't their thing and pursue the dreams. When asked in elementary school the popular question, "what do you want to be when you grow up?" I don't think many people answered "certified financial planner or charted financial advisor." If 5 years from now you see me flying a navy jet or driving a formula one car, you know what made me change my mind.
 
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