I was reading the Great Gastby....

tmukg21

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....and found this quote

"Civilization's going to pieces. I've gotten to be a terrible pessimist about things... The idea is if we don't look out the white race willbe--will be utterly submerged... It's up to us, who are the dominant race, to watch out or these other races will have control of things."

I was like
, then looking at the minority growth rate


So the other races will send the world to hell?
 
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This is one of the books that usually fall into "required" reading in High School that I didn't read. We read "A Time To Kill" instead.I just might pick this one up.
 
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Tom was set up as a straw man for, what were really rather common, pseudo-scientific racialist ideas. You're supposed to think he's stupid.
 
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Don't take the quote out of the context of the plot. The quote is used to characterize Tom, who shows intolerance throughout the entire novel.
 

frankdolla

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When My mans Broke his girls nose.... I Lol'd... thats the only part of that book I read.
 
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They believe that, which is why they consolidate their power/ influence. So even when they are the minor they will still be the majority. They knew that theywould eventually be the minority a long long time ago, so they made their moves accordingly.
 
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Originally Posted by DAYTONA 5000

They believe that, which is why they consolidate their power/ influence. So even when they are the minor they will still be the majority. They knew that they would eventually be the minority a long long time ago, so they made their moves accordingly.
well generally speaking - poorer people will reproduce at much higher rates than well-to-do's... both as a cause and effect of their poverty.
 
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this book has an incredibly cliche plot, however the deeper meanings are INSANE, so much hidden stuff, let me post my SHORT parallelism in color imagerysummary for this book

Parallelism in The Great Gatsby

F. Scott Fitzgerald incorporates color imagery in virtually every scene in The Great Gatsby. Without the use of this stylistic device, much of the commentary in the novel would disappear, and the reader left with only the plot. Any occurrence can be related to the plot, however, when colors are introduced to the mix, it allows the analytic reader to delve deeper into the significance of each event or object. The most colors most prominent from beginning to end exhibiting change are: yellow, green, white, and grey or colorlessness. Every color bears a distinct meaning and the use of a color can, as a result, drastically modify the significance of any entity.
Of all the colors utilized to describe the qualities of objects, yellow is most widely used. Through the entirety of the novel, Gatsby hopes to achieve the same status as the old rich. Yellow, or in this case gold, portrays this type of wealth during the beginning, and through the middle of the novel.. In the past, the dollar was backed by the gold standard, which it was later taken off, and gold therefore refers to this older wealth. Daisy, whom Gatsby pursued during his youth, falls into the category of the old rich. Seen as a "golden girl", Gatsby claims that Daisy possesses a "voice full of money": an obvious reference to the wealth her family amassed, when Gatsby was still poor and had no chance at a romantic relationship with her. As a result, he determines he must achieve the same status as Daisy's family to build a future with her. Gatsby plays "yellow cocktail music" at his to show he belongs among the old rich, with Daisy. Gatsby also decorates his house with a "real brass rail" which- although possessing a similar color to that of gold- is not gold, and shows that, in reality, Gatsby does not belong among the old rich, despite his efforts. In further hopes of convincing those around him of his status, Gatsby drives a yellow Rolls-Royce. The golden hue of Gatsby's majestic automobile proves his desire to display himself as the old rich to those around him. Despite this clear relationship between yellow and wealth, the color represents another characteristic as well. Yellow relates closely to death and impurity. The car Daisy drives when she hits and kills Myrtle is Gatsby's Rolls-Royce. Initially described as cream-colored, witnesses refer to the "death car" as yellow after the accident. Here, an association forms between yellow and death, the negative meaning behind yellow. Earlier, when Gatsby lies to Nick about his past, he dons a "caramel-colored suit", a mixture of gold and yellow. He claims to be the "son of some wealthy people in the Middle West". As well as demonstrating the relation to monetary wealth, the suit shows the destructive aspect of the yellow, Gatsby's lies. Ultimately, Gatsby's attempts to portray himself as something other that his true self culminate in his demise, the final meaning of yellow. Gatsby "disappeared among the yellowing trees" when he was murdered by Wilson. Yellow evolves from the beginning of the novel where it displays wealth, to a more sinister meaning as Gatsby enables Daisy to kill Myrtle and finally dies, both occurring among yellow surroundings.
The destruction yellow entails directly contrasts with the aspirations of green that Gatsby embodies. As a result, the symbolism of yellow would lose significance without green, which creates the dilemmas yellow qualities are a response to. Green signifies hope for the future and dreams. Gatsby sees a "single green light, minute and far away" from his property. The light flashes from the end of Daisy's dock, and symbolizes Gatsby's desire to be with Daisy. "Gatsby believed in the green light" and this devotion to his hopes leads him to accrue wealth, in hopes of courting her. As such, green is a reference to his dream and the American dream as well. After Myrtle's death, Michaelis initially reports Gatsby's Rolls-Royce incorrectly as light green to the police as he "wasn't even sure of its color" due to his admiration of the car, and not yet fully recognizing the bloodshed resulting from its use. It is later discovered that the car was actually yellow. The change in perception of the color shows the American dream, represented by green, being shattered through the introduction of yellow, already proven to indicate destruction, when all Gatsby has worked for unravels towards the end of his life. Nick reflects on the idealistic American dream towards the end of the book. He visualizes the "fresh, green breast of the new world" as the first settlers experienced the land. The new land allowed immigrants to declare independence from their past and shape their future, leading to the development of the American dream. Unfortunately, the vast majority, like Gatsby, focus on the past, with naïve expectations they will "run faster" and achieve their dreams later, when they ought to focus on it now. Gatsby's fixation upon his past, which prevented him from marrying Daisy, now hampers him from achieving his dream of finally being with her.
The loss of purity evident in Gatsby's love for Daisy, as it ends in death, is mirrored by the development of other characters in the book. White indicates purity and innocence and Pammy, Daisy's daughter, wears a white dress when Gatsby sees her for the first time. The dress shows how such a young girl has not yet learned to lie or deceive and remains entirely innocent. In an attempt to display themselves in the same way, Jordan and Daisy consistently wear white dresses. They each wish to emulate the innocence of their own "white girlhood" However, they consistently lie and rather than devoting themselves to one sexual partner, commit adultery. With such actions, comes an obvious loss of innocence and the two can no longer call themselves pure. Daisy is aware that she must maintain such an image in order to be appealing. In order to do so she insists on wearing a "white evening dress" and wears white make-up powder on her face. She uses this mask to show herself to others as innocent, despite her clear perversion of the concept of purity. Gatsby's desires go awry when Daisy further proves she has lost her innocence. He allows her to drive his Rolls-Royce, but Daisy's irresponsibility results in Myrtle's death.
Traumatized by his wife's death, Wilson seeks revenge against the believed murderer. Gatsby's pursuit of his dreams ends abruptly with the intervention of an "ashen fantastic figure" when Wilson shoots Gatsby to death. The word ashen describes Wilson due to its lack of color. Grey and a general colorlessness signify a lack of vitality. Wilson, devoid of a lively personality, is uninteresting and dreary akin to the grey of ashes. The ashes are the product of burned and obviously dead wood. At some point Wilson must have been youthful, but as shown by his "pale eyes" he is now lifeless. The eyes are the window to the soul, and when the eyes display no luster, there must be no soul left. Due to Wilson's lack of vitality, his role as the taker of life seems appropriate. The man, who loses his love and his life, takes Gatsby's life in retaliation.
Color imagery persists from start to finish in The Great Gatsby. With the addition of color to F. Scott Fitzgerald's already vast arsenal of stylistic devices, the mix becomes even more potent. Colors add an entirely new dimension to the depth of each character by fleshing them out and explaining their actions and thoughts much deeper than the plot. With colors Fitzgerald does more than just tell a story. He paints a vivid commentary, displaying his opinions on the state of humanity and the differences in lifestyle among the middle class and the new and old rich.

I did this at 1.30 in the morning on the due date and got a high A


idk how to double space on here

btw, I wouldnt copy this if I was you, teachers have software that WILL get you
 
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Originally Posted by Falcon4567

Tom was set up as a straw man for, what were really rather common, pseudo-scientific racialist ideas. You're supposed to think he's stupid.
exactly.. that wasn't supposed to be Fitzgerald giving his own views.

it was just Tom's character, who said a lot of off-the-wall things throughout the novel.

well, Fitzgerald WAS a racist... but i don't think he was trying to pass on a racist POV to the reader in that quote. if he was, he would have establishedTom as somebody with credible ethos, which he did not.


edit: ^boy edit that +%%% out, nobodys trying to read your long @+# essay on Niketalk
 
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You know whats funny...
My sister is watching phineas and ferb.
and I looked at your avy..
how old are you
 

tmukg21

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Originally Posted by dopestop

You know whats funny...
My sister is watching phineas and ferb.
and I looked at your avy..
how old are you


2__


caught a marathon of it one day last semester over winter break, catchy little show
 
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Actually, that is Fitzgerald's own voice. There have been criticisms about Fitzgerald as being a racist. There are letters to his daughter saying that sheshould not hang out with colored people.

"The negroid streak creeps northward to defile the Nordic race"

Tell that to your teacher; get an A. Profit!!!
 
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Originally Posted by bifl43

dendanskesimo -- think hemingway. too many 50 cent words.
honestly, I dont get what you said

not takin down the essay, cuz anybody who doesnt care can just skip over it, while anyone who actually intends on reading the book and the meanings of everything and not just the plot could gain a lil bit of insight from it
 
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i remember in high school we were discussing it after we were supposed to have finished it, of course i didn't read it but i was just participating,whatever, then someone said

Spoiler [+]
blah blah gatsby dies
and i was like "%!* gatsby dies?"
i got a huge
from the teacher
 
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Originally Posted by dendanskesimon

Originally Posted by bifl43

dendanskesimo -- think hemingway. too many 50 cent words.
honestly, I dont get what you said

not takin down the essay, cuz anybody who doesnt care can just skip over it, while anyone who actually intends on reading the book and the meanings of everything and not just the plot could gain a lil bit of insight from it
I read 3/4ths of the essay. Pretty well done, I never noticed the importance of colors.... I was very young though.

Did you do research on that or do you really figure it out on your own?
 
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^ thanks, it was from the beginning of the semester, and only me and 1 other kid have beaten the grade on it so far

I found all that stuff on my own though, its insane how much stuff is packed in there, theres surely TONS of things I missed just on the subject of colors
 
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