Jena 6 Protest on 9-20 in DC

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Yeah I'll be out there.
202< Bush Lives In My Backyard, He Doesn't Dare Hop That Fence >202
 
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I'll be at the Capitol that day but not to protest.
Hopefully they'll all get off so that it might set a legal precedent for when me and 5 of my friends want to take the @#%$ way out and roll one person whenever we feel like it there might not be any repercussions.
THAT WAS A PIMP SCHOOL MAN!
 
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im on the GW campus which is the closest metro stop to the capitol building?
 
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What exactly are you saying The BadgeMan? That these guys deserve to be punished, sentenced to how many years in prison? What about the hate crime that was played off to be a joke? Do you not see the injustice that is going on down there? I will be there Thursday morning...hope to see you all there.
 
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Honestly, I don't think they should get off clean but they shouldn't have received most of those charges...if they are not adults they should be tried in juvenile court
un0.

TEAMPLATANO
 

Methodical Management

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I'll be there. It actually works out very conveniently, since I have to be at the Capitol Building that afternoon anyway for a panel discussion regarding the subprime mortgage meltdown - an issue of critical importance to anyone at all concerned about the racial wealth gap and/or poverty.

Quote:[hr][/hr]Hopefully they'll all get off so that it might set a legal precedent for when me and 5 of my friends want to take the way out and roll one person whenever we feel like it there might not be any repercussions.[hr][/hr]
ed after students hung nooses from a tree, which was dismissed as a harmless prank by the superintendent. Those responsible received three day suspensions. When black students so much as sat under this same tree in protest, the district attorney paid the school a visit. Was he there to condemn the cowardly act of hanging nooses from a tree? No. He showed up to intimidate the protesters, chiding them and warning that "I can take away your lives with a stroke of my pen."

This whole sad incident is BEYOND flagrant. If Americans can't even acknowledge THIS as racism, then what the heck is? This is a classic example of "southern justice," Jim Crow style.
 
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Meth: Do you have an online non-special interest news source that breaks down the events w/o obvious bias in either direction? The different sources I've read seem to conflict with each other as to some of the events.
And actually depending on the actual location of the protest the Capitol South station may be closer, though I suppose it depends on what line you're on, might not be worth a transfer if you're already on the red line.
THAT WAS A PIMP SCHOOL MAN!
 
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Quote:[hr][/hr]He showed up to intimidate the protesters, chiding them and warning that "I can take away your lives with a stroke of my pen."[hr][/hr]



This protest is even bigger than Jena 6.... this is a CULMINATION of a few Jim Crow style cases here recently...
Including Marcus Dixon in GA....
 
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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Well yeah everything has it's spin, I was referring more to the accounts being given by organizations that will end up making $$$ promoting the cause. One thing I couldn't get a clear handle on when reading...did Bell have any priors?
THAT WAS A PIMP SCHOOL MAN!
 
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You are speaking the truth Method Man, but what I don't understand is how some Americans can act as if this isn't going on, mostly white, but still....they speak of it as if it's in a history book, this is todays history and we all, no matter what color need to come together and see this for what it is, RACISM. Another one i get is, well if they're racist down there the black guys should have known and not done anything to the white kids.........@#%$! i swear some people just dont, i can't even call it.....
 
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"a threat to justice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere" - martin luther king

hopefully this turns out to be a peaceful demonstration (i dont see why not)..... dc law enforcement officials are itching to break the record of arrests set last weekend by the war on terror rally at layfayette park and the capitol. locked up 190 bammaz. not to mention dc residents are a lil upset over the killing of a 14 yr old southeast male by the boys in blue.

just a question to fellow nt'ers, i know most of yawl are in west bubble but how many people have been pulled over by the capitol police for riding up that hill on independence next to the capitol and library of congress? i know i have more than 5 times
TRYIN TO STAY HATA FREE... STILL WATCH WHAT U SAY TO ME
 

Methodical Management

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What'd you guys think?

In terms of wearing black... given that this was pretty short notice I thought it went reasonably well. Only around 3-5% of the people I saw today were wearing all black (and granted this IS DC, a lot of people wear all black regardless) but you see groups of 3-5 people together wearing all black and, from that, you know it's conscious.

Turnout seemed ok, but placement was interesting. I wonder if the organizers were told to set up there or if they did so intentionally, but the other side of the Capitol would've been preferable by far. Where they set up was more COMFORTABLE due to the shade, but it wasn't set up such that news cameras could frame the speakers AND the Capitol in the background - which would've been far more powerful. I have to wonder if they'll ever really allow what is, essentially, a protest demonstration to mount speakers in front of monuments... because something tells me the government would prefer to never see another '63 March On Washington.

It's funny, I was just having a conversation with a few people the other night on the issue of public demonstrations and protest movements, and I think one of the major problems we face, in this era, is just how splintered the audience is. In the '60s, television had only recently breached the mass audience. While widely available, few channels existed and the media wasn't as sophisticated or as self-interested with respect to news coverage and agenda-setting. If a protest occurred, it would be covered and ALL stations would have it. Thus, everyone would find out about it.

Now, with cable and the fracturing of the mass audience, that's no longer the case. The primary means of informing the public with respect to this particular event occurred from the Internet and word of mouth - and you've got two major problems there: one, again, massive splintering of the audience and, second, the digital divide. Half of this country still doesn't have Internet access and many people have no access to computer training in the first place. So, when you have the event organizers promoting web addresses during the event, you have to wonder if, perhaps, they're truly connected with the audience. The local networking is lacking. In the 50's and 60's, your information backbone ran through the churches and local chapters of various civil rights organizations.

However successful the event, I think using this as a springboard to a movement will be very, very difficult.

Hopefully, though, we'll at least see more media coverage as this has taken a LONG time to even become a peripheral issue within the scope of the mass media. I think true success would be defined as positioning this as THE story, but then, wouldn't you know it, OJ had to go get arrested again. So much for that.

Quote:[hr][/hr]You are speaking the truth Method Man, but what I don't understand is how some Americans can act as if this isn't going on, mostly white, but still....they speak of it as if it's in a history book, this is todays history and we all, no matter what color need to come together and see this for what it is, RACISM.[hr][/hr]

It's tough to call. All we can do is speculate, but generally I've found that the only sort of racism that most people are willing to acknowledge is OVERT and indisputable racism: i.e. the murder of James Byrd, the harassment of Vietnamese shrimpers by the KKK back in the 80's, thus and so. If there's any possible avenue for denial, whether real or imagined, many people will take it.

For example, most of us can recognize the racism present in the response to Katrina - many Americans deny that. Most of us can easily recognize the racial factor in the killing of Amadou Diallo - many Americans still insist that it was either an innocent mistake that had nothing to do with race or that he somehow brought it on himself by "acting nervous" or something stupid.

It's psychological. Many people do NOT experience racism on a daily basis or even on a regular basis. Race isn't an issue for them EVEN when they're behaving in ways the subconsciously assert and enforce racism on others. So, the only time they experience racial discomfort is when someone raises the issue and, then, because they don't experience it and acknowledging it would DRAMATICALLY alter their world-view, conscience, and even self-esteem. Remember, most people have had the "american dream" sense of individualism ingrained in their minds from an early age. They believe that they've earned EVERYTHING they receive in life, to suggest to them that they may be recipients of unearned privilege is to powerfully damage their self-image and some of their most deeply rooted beliefs about our society.

In this case, a crime was committed and most people will cling to that. They'll say "oh, well what are you complaining about? If you assault someone you SHOULD go to jail," just as sentencing disparities (i.e. mandatory minimums), racial profiling, et al. fail to elicit sympathy in that the victims, in these cases, are accused of criminal behavior and, whether guilty or not, the sheer stigma of being charged with a crime causes many people to lose any and all sympathy for them. Remember, many people, based on their direct experiences, feel as though you'll NEVER have ANY problem with the police unless you've done something wrong.

People experience America SO differently that what makes perfect logical sense to you or me couldn't appear further from the truth to someone else.

The catch, of course, is that everyone knows what America is SUPPOSED to be like, ideally. We know how police officers are SUPPOSED to treat people. We know how real estate agents are SUPPOSED to operate. So, people who actually experience discrimination directly (or are, at minimum, conscious of it) are capable of viewing America from multiple perspectives while those who ONLY experience the ideal can't conceive of anything else. Unless, of course, they simply accept other points of view as valid and not mutually exclusive.

Quote:[hr][/hr]meth can u write my college essay[hr][/hr]
drag racing.
 
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Quote:[hr][/hr]Meth (or anyone else who wants to answer), in the interest of discussion...what privileges or opportunities have you been denied based strictly on your race? [hr][/hr]
|I
ed on my Army career... :rofl:
 
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