Official 2018 Los Angeles Dodgers Thread : Game 4

Los Angeles

formerly bright nikes
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I think with the success of the HR ball hitters have pretty much been getting to happy with their swings - shorten the **** up, play some small ball and move the damn runner!
 
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Can’t wait to have Saegar at full strength again. Having him Could be Like a great free agent signing
 

Los Angeles

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such a shame how that freese situation was handled based on ****ing #s - he obviously had the hot bat man!

belli :smh: so much talent, take off that damn cuban he started to wear, button up your damn jersey and put the damn ball in play,
 
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Fan fest today has me excited for the season. I want to go to one eventually, but sucks to be all the way up in Seattle now.
 
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Seriously though, Harper going to the Giants would be the ultimate slap in the face. I love sabrmetrics and finding value too, but no one is going to forget that the Dodgers have A LOT of money and are being cute with it...
 
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^^^
Yeah you're right about the hesitance with dealing prospects but I mentioned money because that's the only thing stopping them from signing Harper. Not dealing for Realmuto I understand, because I wouldn't trade Belly, Verdugo, and Ruiz/Smith for him.
 

Los Angeles

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oh ok, well there must be a reason why manny & bryce havent signed yet ... how many days are we out till spring training?!

dodgers should just throw a 1 year deal at bryce
 

snkrfollower

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well there must be a reason why manny & bryce havent signed yet
Yeah, collusion by GMs to drive down market value. Dudes are gonna be making late-'80s salaries soon. All stars will be signing 3-year $9 million deals. This NL DH **** is the sop they'll give the MLBPA to keep them quiet about it, too, so these guys can play into their late 30's :nerd:
 

Los Angeles

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The ask of the Dodgers, ever-cautious themselves, was two from a group of Dustin May, Keibert Ruiz, Gavin Lux, and Will Smith, per Heyman, in the same tweet. Ruiz and Smith, both catchers, likely won’t ever be on the field together at Chavez Ravine, and some outlets ranked neither May nor Lux inside the top 100. Both Heyman and Rosenthal concede that Cody Bellinger was the prize on which Miami initially laid its eyes, but it appears the team quickly swiveled to less-established names in the weeks to follow.
So you're telling me you couldn't give up one of the catching prospects + May or Lux for Realmuto? Crazy.
 
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Yeah, they’re out of their minds if all it would’ve took was Ruiz/Smith and Lux/May. Only justifiable thing is if they were hesitant because they’re still considering and prioritizing a trade for Kluber.
 
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I doubt it.

They have shown that all they care about is making money and the LA fan base is so loyal to the Dodgers, they will make money.
 
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Damn thought I read they traded Turner as well. :lol:

Had me about to weep. Our most consistent guy the last few years.
 

Los Angeles

formerly bright nikes
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Yeah, they’re out of their minds if all it would’ve took was Ruiz/Smith and Lux/May. Only justifiable thing is if they were hesitant because they’re still considering and prioritizing a trade for Kluber.
****, I'd like to be optimistic and hope so but the truth is our rotation is pretty much set :sick:
 
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Cody is FEELING himself haha! Here's a piece from The Athletic, my favorite quote from Belly was "...Even when I’m not good, I’m still really good." :

Cody Bellinger wants regular role: ‘I should be in the lineup every single day’


By Pedro Moura Feb 14, 2019
9

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Cody Bellinger felt terrible for so much of last season, feeble and powerless and often inept. But the numbers say he was well above average. And the numbers give him confidence.

“It’s very promising because of how ****ty I felt,” Bellinger said. “If that’s my lowest it’s gonna go, well, ****.”

Hellbent on repeating his rookie year but uncertain how to do it, Bellinger spent his sophomore season switching up his swing and approach weekly, even daily. The 23-year-old took advice from anyone offering ideas and instituted much of them immediately. Some days he was great. Others he was an automatic out. Sometimes he didn’t even start.

Yet, overall, he was still elite. At a .814 OPS, he was 20 percent better than the average hitter. Incorporating defense and baserunning, Baseball-Reference.com’s Wins Above Replacement metric measured only 30 position players more valuable. Bellinger would’ve been 12 MLB teams’ top performer.

“I should be in the lineup every single day,” Bellinger told The Athletic. “I don’t think there’s a question about that. Even when I’m not good, I’m still really good.”

Bellinger, who reported to Camelback Ranch well ahead of next week’s deadline for position players, senses the team’s decision makers agree with him. Manager Dave Roberts has indicated as such publicly. But Bellinger still feels the need to say something to his bosses this month, having been scarred by a September spent coming off the bench and a World Series in which he sat more than he started and collected only one hit in 16 tries.

“We had to win games, and I understood that,” Bellinger said. “I obviously didn’t like that, but what was best for the team at the time might’ve been that. We never really know. It was just an unfortunate situation for me because I know I would be an everyday player on every other team.”

During his standout rookie season, Bellinger started nearly every game when he was healthy, and mostly at first base. In 2018, Bellinger started 135 of the Dodgers’ regular-season games, or 83 percent, his opportunities increasingly shifting to center field.

Now, both of those positions are occupied, and Bellinger will spend most of spring training preparing to play right field. He doesn’t care about where he plays as long as he does play.

“I love center field. I love first,” he said. “I will play right. I will do that. Getting in the lineup is important. Because if I play consistently, whether it’s left field, center, right, first base, I know for a fact I would win a Gold Glove anywhere. And they know I’m a Gold Glove anywhere I go. I just need to be in the lineup every day.”

Over the offseason, Bellinger spoke several times by phone with Roberts, in conversations he called promising. He also visited Camelback Ranch and Dodger Stadium, working on his approach with new hitting coach Robert Van Scoyoc in Los Angeles and hitting strategist Brant Brown in Glendale.

The two presented Bellinger with a package of metrics that he said proved last season went better than it felt. And they set out to do better. They emphasized the value of using his leverage as an advantage within his swing, staying simple and returning to his old ways. He said his approach will mirror that of his Rookie of the Year campaign.



Cody Bellinger managed just one hit against Boston in the World Series. (Gary A. Vasquez / USA TODAY Sports)
“It’s what I was doing in 2017 with more of an understanding of what I was doing,” Bellinger said. “Because my whole life I was just swinging. I never had an understanding of what I was really doing. I was just talented enough to keep hitting the ball and have results.”

President of baseball operations Andrew Friedman said he is most curious this spring to see how the team’s new hitting coaches and their tactics take hold. There may be no better test case than Bellinger. The Dodgers did not want to take him out of their lineup last year. They did it only when it became an imperative, when his OPS against left-handers loomed below .700 as September approached and National League West rivals needed to be caught.

“This is a production business,” Roberts said. “When you’re playing for a championship every single year, there’s nothing handed to anybody. So there’s a point where production should matter, right? But for him to be in there every day, that’s a great sign for the Dodgers.

“Right now, and going forward, Cody’s gotta be our guy.”

Bellinger made mistakes in 2018. Anxious about his average in May, he made mechanical changes to his swing that rendered him susceptible to sweeping breaking balls from left-handed pitchers. He never fully recovered. And he showed up to spring training too big, having spent the winter striving to see a bigger number when he stepped on the scale.

“I thought that was important to people,” Bellinger said this week. “At the end of the day, it’s really not.”

He lost the extra weight by June anyway. So he focused this winter on adding muscle, not weight, and he arrived lighter, aware he is likely to man the outfield. He saw himself as an all-around player, not solely a slugger.

“I’m gonna help the team win on offense, defense, baserunning, because I can do it all,” Bellinger said. “But I can’t do it off the bench. And they know that.”

They know, but he still plans to emphasize it.

“I’m gonna have that conversation here soon with them,” he said. “I want that, and I know they’ll give it to me. They’re really good at communicating. So, it’s gonna be nice to see what the actual plan is.”
 
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