***Official Political Discussion Thread***

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CuG2uwuWIAA-J9q
 

kdawg

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Yeah, it’s a weird thing that some people think that their beliefs should apply to everyone - obviously there are extreme examples that are against the law or just how society should be (I don’t care that you think you should be allowed to interfere with kids…) but generally it’s not your job to impose that on others.

Don’t want to eat meat on a Friday? Great, I can do what I want though.

Like you said - don’t want to marry the same sex? Okay, don’t. Others may want to.

Don’t believe in contraception? Do what you want, most others find it useful though.

And many more examples. It’s an odd thing IMO. I guess it’s the usual rich, white misogynistic behavior they’ve got away with for decades taken to its logical conclusion.
 

kdawg

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^rich old white males who are Christian. Can’t leave out the religion portion, as well as the underlying racism. It’s baffling they think Jesus would hate on so many people in this world.

Yeah, except I would say “Christian”. It’s that modern evangelical movement which as you say doesn’t bear any resemblance to what Jesus actually says in the bible.

Rampant hypocrisy too - stopping everyone except their mistresses from getting abortions.
 
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Yeah, it’s a weird thing that some people think that their beliefs should apply to everyone - obviously there are extreme examples that are against the law or just how society should be (I don’t care that you think you should be allowed to interfere with kids…) but generally it’s not your job to impose that on others.

Don’t want to eat meat on a Friday? Great, I can do what I want though.

Like you said - don’t want to marry the same sex? Okay, don’t. Others may want to.

Don’t believe in contraception? Do what you want, most others find it useful though.

And many more examples. It’s an odd thing IMO. I guess it’s the usual rich, white misogynistic behavior they’ve got away with for decades taken to its logical conclusion.
it certainly does get out of hand but not just beliefs as it is but rather questioning or putting doubts or imposing their belief system as long as it pleases them or agrees to them. this is exactly we got established norms and rules. the minute people are allowed to question these acceptable and logical norms that we are headed towards anarchy. it is just plain insanity/lunacy and there is no other word for it.
 
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Who needs redundancy anyway?


ERCOT said six power plants went offline on Friday afternoon and resulted in the loss of about 2,900 megawatts of electricity.

They’re asking Texans to set their thermostats to 78 degrees or above and avoid the usage of large appliances such as dishwashers, washers and dryers during peak hours between 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. through the weekend.

Demand is currently at 64,000 megawatts, according to ERCOT data, and the dashboard on its website says “there is enough power for current demand.” As of 4 p.m. on Friday, 66% of thermal resources were running, along with 73% of solar and 17% of wind. Temperatures are forecast at 95 degrees Saturday and 98 degrees Sunday, according to the National Weather Service in Fort Worth. They’re expected to remain in the 90s to 100s through next week.

ERCOT can't handle the cold, and it can't handle the heat (and it's only May)

Think Texans will finally figure it out?
 
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The Issue:​

Due to increased restrictions on immigration and travel, which began with the COVID-19 pandemic in the early months of 2020, the net inflow of immigrants into the United States has essentially halted for almost two years. By the end of 2021 there were about 2 million fewer working-age immigrants living in the United States than there would have been if the pre-2020 immigration trend had continued unchanged.

Of these lost immigrants, about 1 million would have been college educated. The data on labor shortages across industries suggest that this dramatic drop in foreign labor-supply growth is likely a contributor to the current job shortages and could slow down employment recovery and growth as the economy picks up speed.

The Facts:​

During the years 2020 and 2021, the number of immigrants arriving in the United States decreased substantially. In the early months of 2020 and in response to the COVID-19 health crisis, the Trump administration closed the borders with Mexico and Canada and placed restrictions on international arrivals. Visa processing at U.S. embassies and consulates around the world was also severely disrupted, leading to a dramatic decline in the inflow of foreign nationals on all types of temporary visas.

According to the Department of State, the slowdown in visa processing generated much fewer visa entries and a large backlog of more than 460,000 people with unprocessed visas as of late 2021. Similarly, the number of permanent residents arriving in the U.S. also fell substantially. Statistical estimates relative to the Fiscal year 2020 (from Oct. 1, 2019 to Sept. 30, 2020) indicate a decrease of immigrant visas by 45% and a decrease of nonimmigrant visas by 54% relative to the previous year.

The loss of foreign workers is not the only reason for the high rate of unfilled jobs. Increased retirement and increased bargaining power of workers are likely playing an important role. While more generous unemployment and welfare benefits introduced during the crisis may have discouraged workers from taking low-paying jobs in 2020 and early 2021, they do not seem to be the cause of current shortages, since most of those benefits expired by mid-2021. Recent anecdotal and preliminary evidence finds a push by workers for more job-flexibility, safety and, generally, better conditions causing resignations and contributing to unfilled job openings.

Moreover, increased retirement rates have contributed to the decline in available workers. A recent study finds that just excess retirement and reduced re-entry of retirees to the labor force has increased the share of retirees relative to the U.S. labor force by 1.3 percentage points in the last two years (compared to an annual rate of increase or about 0.3 percentage points prior to the pandemic).

The loss of immigrants could imply a large loss of entrepreneurship. Immigrants have a three times higher probability of starting firms than natives in the U.S., according to estimates from an article published in 2020. Immigrants are more likely to start small firms (with 0-10 employees) but also medium size and large firms (with 1,000 employees or more) relative to natives. Using the estimated entrepreneurship rate of immigrants from this study, two million fewer immigrants would imply a decline in firm creation, solely due to lack of entrepreneurs, corresponding to a loss of more than 200,000 jobs.

The loss of foreign college students will affect American educational institutions. Foreign college students are the part of the foreign-born population with the largest decline in the last two years. After decades of continued growth in foreign enrollment in American colleges and universities, peaking in 2018-19, their number dropped by 20% in 2020. This has had an adverse effect on higher education, one of the largest U.S. service exports.

Furthermore, foreign students, especially graduate students, have been very important contributors to U.S. research and innovation and patenting. Their absence could weaken the innovation and patenting potential of those universities, research institutions, and businesses that depend on cutting-edge research and innovation.
 
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