Pennsylvania judge sentenced to 28 years in prison for selling teens to prisons

Discussion in 'General' started by jchambers, May 4, 2013.

  1. jchambers

    jchambers Banned

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    Disgraced Pennsylvania judge Mark Ciavarella Jr has been sentenced to 28 years in prison for conspiring with private prisons to sentence juvenile offenders to maximum sentences for bribes and kickbacks which totaled millions of dollars. He was also ordered to pay $1.2 million in restitution.

    In the private prison industry the more time an inmate spends in a facility, the more of a profit is reaped from the state. Ciavearella was a figurehead in a conspiracy in the state of Pennsylvania which saw thousands of young men and women unjustly punished and penalized in the name of corporate profit.

    According to allgov.com Ciavearella's cases from 2003 - 2008 were reviewed by a special investigative panel and later by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court and it was found that upwards of 5,000 young men and women were denied their constitutional rights, and therefore all of their convictions were dismissed and were summarily released.

    During his sentencing Ciavarella was defiant, claiming he had broken no laws and claimed the money he received was a legitimate 'finders fee.' Assistant U.S. Attorney Gordon Zubrod said comments such as these were typical of Ciavarella, according to the local reporting of citizensvoice.com:

    I think that's his way of doing things. Never retreat. Always go on the attack. Always blame somebody else. Always get them to back off. He tried it with the judge. It didn't work.


    http://www.examiner.com/article/pen...-28-years-prison-for-selling-teens-to-prisons




    This is the world that we live in, ladies and gentlemen. I'm glad he got a long sentence.Who knows how many other judges are doing stuff like this. It is disgusting that it is profitable to imprison. :smh:



    "Kids-for-cash" scandal
    Main article: Kids for cash scandal

    Ciavarella pleaded guilty on February 13, 2009, pursuant to a plea agreement, to federal charges of honest services fraud, wire fraud and tax evasion in connection with receiving $2.6 million in kickbacks from Robert Powell and Robert Mericle, the co-owner and builder respectively, of two private, for-profit juvenile facilities. In exchange for these kickbacks, Ciavarella sentenced children to extended stays in juvenile detention for offenses as minimal as mocking a principal on Myspace, trespassing in a vacant building, and shoplifting DVDs from Wal-mart.[6] More specifically, the crimes charged were: conspiracy to deprive the public of the "intangible right of honest services", or corruption, and conspiracy to defraud the United States by failing to report income to the Internal Revenue Service.[7] Ciavarella tendered his resignation to Governor Ed Rendell on January 23, 2009, prior to official publication of the charges.[2]

    The plea agreement[8] called for Ciavarella to serve up to seven years in prison, pay fines and restitution, and accept responsibility for the crimes.[9] However, Ciavarella has denied that there was a connection between the juvenile sentences he rendered and the kickbacks he received.[10][11] In part because of this denial, on July 30, 2009, Judge Edwin M. Kosik of Federal District Court in Scranton, Pennsylvania rejected the plea agreement. He ruled that Ciavarella had continued to deny that there was a ‘quid pro quo’ between his receipt of money and his jailing of juveniles, instead characterizing the money as a "finder’s fee" despite what Judge Kosik felt was the weight of the government's evidence.[12] Attorneys for the two judges brought a motion requesting reconsideration of the judge's rejection of the plea agreement.[13] The motion was denied on August 24, and Ciavarella and Conahan withdrew their guilty pleas, an action that could result in a jury trial or additional charges against the former judges.[14]

    On September 9, 2009, a federal grand jury in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania returned a 48 count indictment against Ciavarella and Conahan,[15] which includes racketeering, fraud, money laundering, extortion, bribery, and federal tax violations. Both judges were arraigned on the charges on September 15, 2009.[16][17] Ciavarella and Conahan entered pleas of not guilty to the 48 count indictment and remained free on one million dollar bail, despite federal prosecutors contentions that their bail should be raised since they now faced the possibility of substantially more prison time and that there was evidence of their attempts to shield assets.[18]

    On February 18, 2011, a jury in federal court found Ciavarella guilty of racketeering. This charge stemmed from Ciavarella accepting $997,000 in illegal payments from Robert Mericle, the real estate developer of PA Child Care, and attorney Robert Powell, a co-owner of the facility. Ciavarella is also on trial for 38 other counts including accepting numerous payments from Mericle and Powell as well as tax evasion.[19]

    On August 11, 2011, Ciavarella was sentenced to 28 years in federal prison. With good behavior, he could be released in less than 24 years, when he would be 85.[20]


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Ciavarella
     
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  2. rex ryan

    rex ryan Banned

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    He needs to burn in hell
     
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  3. rillo561

    rillo561

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    Good, needs to be a life sentence IMO.
     
  4. ninjahood

    ninjahood

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    THIS is why you can't have a profit driven private prison system....you think stop and frisk is bad? psshhh...imagine when this starts

    to get traction...
     
  5. marley420

    marley420

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    Wow smh. Glad hes in prison
     
  6. tjonpoint

    tjonpoint

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    word?! damn this is crazy...
     
  7. rillo561

    rillo561

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    Thought you 'right wingers' loved this? You know, 'free market' and stuff?
     
  8. jchambers

    jchambers Banned

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    And this is just one guy who got caught. Who knows what else is going on behind the scenes. I am sure that these prison corps lobby for minimum mandatories and more laws to be passed. :smh:
     
  9. ninjahood

    ninjahood

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    1st off, im independent.

    2nd of all, profiting from crime is ALL bad when there's no crime to be had, hence stop and frisk...at that point for da sake of making a quota

    your "Creating crime"....

    da idiot judge had a 7 year plea deal and he aint take it? he's a ******g moron. [​IMG]
     
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  10. ill legal operation

    ill legal operation

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    Slave trade...
     
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  11. jchambers

    jchambers Banned

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    I am far from left wing and it is obvious to me that this type of arrangement is ripe for corruption. There should never be a profit incentive to place people in prison.
     
  12. ninjahood

    ninjahood

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    oh WITHOUT a question...and their also one of da MAIN lobby groups against da legalization of marijuana...
     
  13. rillo561

    rillo561

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    I totally agree, but you talk about 'left wing' 'right wing' stuff, when it's basically black and white. There should be NO for profit prisons. However it's mostly a 'right wing/conservative" ideology that supports this garbage.
     
  14. servechilled81

    servechilled81

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    sickening...
     
  15. jchambers

    jchambers Banned

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    I wouldn't call it a right wing/conservative ideology, I would call it a Republican ideology, which isn't really the same thing these days.
     
  16. rillo561

    rillo561

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    That's the thing, they are sooooo far right that anything different is considered 'liberal' when really it isn't. The line has been blurred.
     
  17. jchambers

    jchambers Banned

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    I just view Democrats and Republicans as different families in the mafia. They might argue over trivial issues, but when it comes to increasing their power and eliminating our rights, they work together. Nothing is ever strictly black and white. I can't imagine a good argument for privatized prisons.
     
  18. royal assassin

    royal assassin

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  19. mister friendly

    mister friendly

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    This judge is a disgusting person :x :smh:
     
  20. rillo561

    rillo561

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    I can't argue with anything here....
     
  21. jthagreat

    jthagreat

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    i honestly dont wanna read this story....
    SM F!!!!N head.
     
  22. kmun44

    kmun44

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    This is from my area, it's been a story for years, kids got severe sentences for things like arguing with their parents and missing days of school.
     
  23. Nike Still Sux

    Nike Still Sux

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    Strong post to profile name ratio
     
  24. jchambers

    jchambers Banned

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    The current incarceration rate deprives record numbers of individuals of their liberty, disproportionately affects people of color, and has at best a minimal effect on public safety. Meanwhile, the crippling cost of imprisoning increasing numbers of Americans saddles government budgets with rising debt and exacerbates the current fiscal crisis confronting states across the nation.

    Private prison companies, however, essentially admit that their business model depends on locking up more and more people. For example, in a 2010 Annual Report filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) stated: “The demand for our facilities and services could be adversely affected by . . . leniency in conviction or parole standards and sentencing practices . . . .” As incarceration rates skyrocket, the private prison industry expands at exponential rates, holding ever more people in its prisons and jails, and generating massive profits.

    And while supporters of private prisons tout the idea that governments can save money through privatization, the evidence that private prisons save taxpayer money is mixed at best – in fact, private prisons may in some instances cost more than governmental ones. Private prisons have also been linked to numerous cases of violence and atrocious conditions.







    http://www.aclu.org/prisoners-rights/private-prisons



    http://www.aclu.org/prisoners-rights/banking-bondage-private-prisons-and-mass-incarceration
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2013
  25. rexanglorum

    rexanglorum

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    I agree. I wish it had been the case that this was just one horribly corrupt and evil person but, sadly, most of our criminal justice system involves this dynamic. This particular judge merely overreached a bit and he is taking the fall for a systemically evil status quo.

    The monsters that history has witnessed at Auschwitz, The Middle Passage, Famagusta and Carthage lurk in ordinary, well educated, wealthy and liberal modern day people who we see every day. All that is needed to make evil surface is to allow unchecked power imbalances.



    BTW, allow me to save lot of your time by emphasizing that "liberal," in this context, means post enlightenment and does not describe one of the American political left.