Ramadan Mubarak Vol. Best Time of the Year

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Ramadan Mubarak to all the Muslim NT'rs. I don't know about y'all but I love this month. It's a chance to reenergize yourself mentally, physically, and most importantly spiritually.

Remember, Ramadan is so much more than not eating. Make your prayers, go to Taravee, read Quran. We all know why we're here. Let's all make the best of this month, inshaAllah.
 
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Everyone says it's about more than not eating but we already know 90% of American Muslims only fast and don't do anything else thinking they did their part
 
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Originally Posted by UPPTEMPO8387

Everyone says it's about more than not eating but we already know 90% of American Muslims only fast and don't do anything else thinking they did their part


That's a pretty gross overestimation.

And lent > Ramadan? With all due respect, giving up Snickers for 40 days isn't all that hard
 
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Not muslim but have many muslim brethrens and for three years i've taken part on the fasting of ramandan. Inshallah I'll do it this year even though it will be tough especially with all the heat waves in NYC
. I admire how spiritually strong one can get and the discipline one gains from this, not to mention its been proven to be healthy. Good luck my brethren and Ramadan mubarak. Peace!
 
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Day 1.

As I've grown older I've gained a greater understanding of the wisdom behind this month.

We as a society don't talk about values enough, and what kind of values we are promoting versus what we are deterring. And I think Ramadan is one of the most blatantly obvious good examples of that, showing us and others exactly what kind of values are important in this religion.

-We gain humility, reminded of how much we complain. How much we get angry over little things. How much we eat and waste. And as we become more aware of the accommodations we have compared to other parts of the world. I think Ramadan shows us that, it simply isn't enough to know. We need to experience something close.
-We gain patience. Especially in this society where everything is available, patience is a value we must all work on.
-Through this control over food, mood, and will, we gain self awareness, and self control-Both extremely lacking in our society today. And these values are developed as aids in that struggle of self control.

These things aren't merely taught, but experienced. It's not the equivalent to watching a good documentary or something. You break your routine for an entire month. The amount of emphasis on practicing Ramadan is indicative of how important these values are in the Islamic context. The stay with us after the month, having changed you for the better. It's a beautiful thing. Islam is a guide for mankind. And that guide states that man must go through this "refresher" in self control and values 1 month out of every 12 beginning with his adolescence. An interesting statement on man's nature.
 

AZwildcats

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Hopefully I lose some pounds this Ramadan, I always end up gaining them .....
 
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Originally Posted by AZwildcats

Hopefully I lose some pounds this Ramadan, I always end up gaining them .....
You mean you gain weight during Ramadan? Makes sense being that your body isn't eating regularly, it saves as many calories as it can in case it doesn't get to eat again soon.
 
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Most everyone gains weight during Ramadan. If you saw how much we eat during iftaar
. Then most people usually eat again before sleeping.

Beautifully said, Mo Matik. We should always take this month with the intention of changing ourselves for the better for the rest of our lives.

At this age, I don't think it's all that hard. I'm in Med school and it's Finals time. I feel much more focused, while my study group is astounded I'm not passed out on the table. This also leads to discussing Islam with non-Muslims, so they can see the beauty of the religion. You know, besides what they see on Fox news
 
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Originally Posted by airmaxpenny1

Question, can you smash during the month, cause I've heard verying answers to this question?
Yes you can, every day after the daily fast period is over. The same as food/water. It's beyond just the physical act as well, you are supposed to keep your mind away from such thoughts entirely.
You are not prohibited from doing so over the entire month 
 

Ramadan Mubarak.
 
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Originally Posted by tkthafm

Originally Posted by airmaxpenny1

Question, can you smash during the month, cause I've heard verying answers to this question?
Yes you can, every day after the daily fast period is over. The same as food/water. It's beyond just the physical act as well, you are supposed to keep your mind away from such thoughts entirely.
You are not prohibited from doing so over the entire month 
 

Ramadan Mubarak.


You forgot to leave out the little only if you're married part
 

AZwildcats

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Originally Posted by djuzi05

Originally Posted by tkthafm

Originally Posted by airmaxpenny1

Question, can you smash during the month, cause I've heard verying answers to this question?
Yes you can, every day after the daily fast period is over. The same as food/water. It's beyond just the physical act as well, you are supposed to keep your mind away from such thoughts entirely.
You are not prohibited from doing so over the entire month 
 

Ramadan Mubarak.


You forgot to leave out the little only if you're married part
i think that was implied 
 
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Ramadan is favorite part of the year. Fasting, chilling with the fam, being in the masjid, and of course Eid-Al-Fitr.
I watched 30 Minutes Or Less today though. Felt like I broke my fast when the strip club scene came on.
 
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http://www.huffingtonpost...lia-famine_b_919312.html
[h1]Ramadan Reflection Day 5: A Prayer for Somalia[/h1]
Imam Khalid Latif is blogging his reflections during the month of Ramadan, featured daily on HuffPost Religion. For a complete record of his previous posts, click over to the Islamic Center at New York University or visit his author page. To follow along with the rest of his reflections, sign up for an author email alert above.

It's shocking to me how many people have no idea what is happening in Somalia right now. Famine, drought and conflict have put almost 3.6 million people at risk of starvation. In the last month alone, 29,000 children have died and according to U.N. Under Secretary General Valerie Amos, and it is projected that up to 600,000 children may die. The Food and Agriculture Organization, also part of the U.N., stated that the famine will probably last until the end of the year and spread across most of the Southern part of Somalia in the next month or so.

Adnan Ansari, the current Vice President of Programs for Islamic Relief USA, wrote in a first-hand account,
"Mogadishu is also officially declared to have catastrophic famine conditions. With the majority of the children being malnourished, the ribs on every child's chest can be counted. Smiles are rare; sighs and wails are commonly heard. People looked at us without any expectation. It seems as though people know that they will have to survive on their own or welcome death early as the only way out.
As a father closed the eyes of his two-year old child while she seemed to take her last breath, we tried to convince him to take her to the hospital. He insisted to let the suffering end. Even though we took the child to the clinic, only a few more breaths had remained--two hours later we found that the body was being prepared for burial."


(Read the full text of his account here.)
So how is it that the world has not noticed? And why is it so difficult for us to give?

It's really hard to find people who are genuinely selfless these days. Our giving unfortunately becomes conditional. We find it hard to move beyond socially constructed differences. I can't get over your skin color being different from mine, or our languages not being the same, or that we practice a different faith. How many of us give just for the sake of giving? How many of us give in a way that our goal isn't to make ourselves feel good, but rather to make someone else feel good?

In the Islamic tradition, an instance comes about where a gift of a goat is sent to the house of the Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him. He immediately begins to distribute the meat from the goat to men and women in his community who are in need. It's not as if this man has lavish banquets and an abundance of food in his home. In some narrations, it is said that that days would go by without a fire being lit in his home because there was nothing to cook on the fire. He himself was someone that did not have that much, which makes it so much more amazing that he was willing to give it away before taking any for himself. He continues to give of this goat until his wife says to him that there is nothing left of it but it's neck. His response to her? All of it is left except it's neck.

He did not see the world in terms of what he was giving up but rather he saw it in terms of what others were gaining. We need to start seeing the world in this way.

How much have any of us given to the people of Somalia who are most definitely in need of our help and support? How much have any of us given to anyone in the last day, week, month, or even year of our lives?

I can't imagine what it would feel like to watch a child die in front of my eyes because they didn't have any food to eat or water to drink. And I can't imagine how I or anyone else can believe that I am a good person, knowing fully that as I write this and as you read this, young children are in fact dying for that very reason and we as a global community are doing virtually nothing about it.

These people have no water to drink. Imagine if that was our reality. What's even more remarkable is that many of them who are Muslim are still fasting because that is how important their Islam is to them.

For those who are interested in donating, you can do so through Islamic Relief USA which has consistently received a four star rating from Charity Navigator for many years. In the spirit of Ramadan, some Muslims are hosting fundraising events in their local communities. Follow suit and organize something yourself. Encourage your friends, communities, and leaders to raise awareness and money for this cause. And at the very least please keep the people of Somalia and East Africa in your prayers. That, at least, won't cost any of us anything.


We should all donate. While we fast for merely a few hours, fathers are holding their children in their arms as they take their last breaths in Somalia.
 
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not to sound ignorant but do all Muslims actually go a month without eating, that's dedication i know i don't have
 
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Originally Posted by AZwildcats

Originally Posted by djuzi05

Originally Posted by tkthafm

Yes you can, every day after the daily fast period is over. The same as food/water. It's beyond just the physical act as well, you are supposed to keep your mind away from such thoughts entirely.
You are not prohibited from doing so over the entire month 
 

Ramadan Mubarak.


You forgot to leave out the little only if you're married part
i think that was implied 
If you smash without being married, I highly doubt God will overlook it because you don't do it for one month then once the month is over you return to having pre-marital sex again.
 
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Originally Posted by Shox23

not to sound ignorant but do all Muslims actually go a month without eating, that's dedication i know i don't have
Sunrise to sunset. 

I'm not Muslim but I tried it one time and it was tough. 
 
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Do you guys gain or lose weight when fasting?
I am trying to get cut by doing Insanity workouts at mid night and eating high amounts of protien and low carbs/fat when I am not fasting
 

Pathos

formerly retrosan
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Originally Posted by ridingonlorenzos

Do you guys gain or lose weight when fasting?
I am trying to get cut by doing Insanity workouts at mid night and eating high amounts of protien and low carbs/fat when I am not fasting
gain, your body just stock up on fats and calories
 
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