Rents Are Through The Roof >10% Over PrePandemic Levels; In 0 of 50 States Can a Minimum Wage Worker Afford Housing

4,969
3,920
Joined
Sep 18, 2013
People that go to public meetings and rant about blocking new development in their neighborhoods are almost as bad as people that do to Trump rallies and chant "Build a Wall"

It is really the explicit display xenophobia and racism that makes one group slightly worse

But the gap is smaller than most people think
Trump has real estate in your head that can't be matched ..
 
26,133
29,434
Joined
Dec 31, 2012
Upper Manhattan. Been here or 8 years. It depends on the building of course.

Bronx is the cheapest yep. East New York yep. We know why though.
8 years ago I would’ve agreed, but even the Bronx getting gentrified crazy. They’re building up parts of the South Bronx that hit for as much as Manhattan places.
 
10,858
13,770
Joined
May 27, 2017
I got a coworker who lives in New York and he was telling me 4-5K for a 1 bedroom is typically. I bust out laughing; ain’t no place that special.
Wild. NYC got some hidden gems for the low. Good thing it's under the radar cuz all these transplants would gobble them up
 
18,996
15,753
Joined
Jan 19, 2007
:rofl: sarcasm for the folks in the bsck

Yeah they corny. How you gonna come to a brown owned liquor store and complain about the volume of the music in their establishment? Go downtown and buy from a “wine and spirits” spot then.
 
10,471
27,144
Joined
Aug 31, 2012
Even with the high incomes, I think about what kind of property you can get 45 minutes outside of the city for a $4-5K/month mortgage and it makes the idea of dropping that much on a 1-bedroom even sillier.
 
67
126
Joined
Sep 1, 2002
Anyone with eyes can see that in the US, the “bluer” the area, the higher the cost of living. Just look at Austin Texas.

Some people talk a bit game, but will do everything they can to keep certain people out, and keep properly values inflated.

This country is beyond rotten.
 

RustyShackleford

Supporter
55,208
157,802
Joined
Jul 20, 2009
Miami has a Republican mayor, in a state with a Republican state government and rents are increasing like crazy

Rents are increasing everywhere

Traditionally the worse of the problem was most concentrated in high-density large metro areas. Cities are mostly blue areas. In suburban areas, which are redder, the same nonsense is done

It is a universal problem, the thing is, people expect liberal areas to do something about it while they don't for Republican areas (which is understandable). Zoning reform is hardly talked about on the right. Even libertarians have generally given up on it

Everywhere, red, blue, urban, suburban, and exurb, needs to reform its zoning laws to encourage more housing to be built. Especially multiple family housing

Unfortunately, NIMBYISM is a sentiment that is not contained to one political party or ideology. Every group has its own stupid reasoning to sabotage more housing being built

The few cities that have done something (Houston and Minnesota), and blue, but they don't go far enough. This is a problem everywhere

This is an issue where you can't map the issue on the usual partisan divide.
 
Last edited:
67
126
Joined
Sep 1, 2002
I understand what you’re saying,

But Miami is one city in a larger county that’s part of a larger metro that is the bluest part of a very red state. I lived there for 25 years. Even before the pandemic, the miami metro was by far the most unaffordable part of a large state.

Once prices rebounded after the Great Recession, if you wanted a piece of property, and didn’t want to pay an arm and a leg for it, you had to move north, into the redder part of the state.
 
10,858
13,770
Joined
May 27, 2017
Even with the high incomes, I think about what kind of property you can get 45 minutes outside of the city for a $4-5K/month mortgage and it makes the idea of dropping that much on a 1-bedroom even sillier.
These transplants just want to brag that they lived in the city like it's a badge of honor

They want to relive their own tv sitcom like friends and sex and the city :lol:
 

RustyShackleford

Supporter
55,208
157,802
Joined
Jul 20, 2009
I understand what you’re saying,

But Miami is one city in a larger county that’s part of a larger metro that is the bluest part of a very red state. I lived there for 25 years. Even before the pandemic, the miami metro was by far the most unaffordable part of a large state.

Once prices rebounded after the Great Recession, if you wanted a piece of land, and didn’t want to pay an arm and a leg for it, you had to move north, into the redder part of the state.
Yeah, your argument is not making sense to me. First, it seemed like you are saying liberals use their power to keep others out, a causation argument. But when presented with an example where they don't have power and the same rental increases are happening your argument shifts to claiming that their mere presence of them is what is causing the issue, which is a correlation argument.

Rising housing cost is not a unique liberal city thing. You are mistaking correlation for causation. It is not the liberalness of cities that is causing these issues. It is the bad housing policy that is present all over the US. If you want to say liberal cities are guilty of it, I would 100% agree with you, but I think it is important people not think of it as some sort of unique problem of liberal ran and leaning cities.

A lot of large cities are blue because that is where most of the minorities, mainly black people, live (welp historically segregated to live). Then young college-educated white people tend to move into cities. Cities are desirable places to live to have access to job markets (and other factors like multifamily housing being found more in cities), so people move there and more people live there. I don't think these groups and uniquely more NIMBY than other groups. Cities that are more densely populated and sooner run out of land to build housing because of zoning. The characteristic of a city, aside from the political views of who lives there, is what is making them become unaffordable quicker.

On a macro level, it is about bad housing policy, about bad urban economics, not politics. This is a problem found in every area across the states. The reason some places have not reached crisis points yet is that they are either now desirable to live in so there is less demand for housing, or there is still available land to build. Not because of better housing policy

But again, this is an economic issue, that is not unique to one group.

The main criticism of the liberal left is that there does exist a pro-affordable housing coalition on the left, with solutions to these problems, but they are mostly getting ignored. The right has no such pro-housing group they pretty much killed theirs.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom