Researchers grow crops on super thin film. What's soil?

Gill Baka Esq. LLC.

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interesting stuff...but as far as Africa and other poverty and famine stricken areas go...I think higher powers like to keep these countries this way.

I mess with horticulture and soil is not the only way to grow plants....the vid is akin to hydroponic systems or even hydroton or coco coir mediums that are neutral but when liquid fertilizers are introduced, they are able to dispense nutes to the root system.

I'm wary of using plastic to grow plants though.
 

quik1987

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I wonder if they could use this to grow quality herbal. With some Solar LED grow lights.
 

Gill Baka Esq. LLC.

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thing about growing herbs especially "rich" herbs is that you need to tweak the nutrients being dispensed to the roots depending on what cycle the plant is in. The vid says that the film is able to deliver nutes to the roots.

But if the film isn't biodegradable or organic than this could be chalked up as an L because it'll probably just add to the plastic waste left over in our environment. hydroponic systems have proven to be quite efficient and show great results...if there was a way to combine organic nute lines that weren't sludgy and clog up reservoirs and some solar powered lights, then that would be a dope eco-friendly route to go. But LED grow lights haven't really impressed me right now, solar powered cells can be faulty and hydroponic systems work well with synthetic nutrients so we still have a ways to go.

If they used black film instead of clear film they would probably have bigger plants because it's known that root systems don't like contact with light.
 

quik1987

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Originally Posted by GrimlocK

thing about growing herbs especially "rich" herbs is that you need to tweak the nutrients being dispensed to the roots depending on what cycle the plant is in. The vid says that the film is able to deliver nutes to the roots.

But if the film isn't biodegradable or organic than this could be chalked up as an L because it'll probably just add to the plastic waste left over in our environment. hydroponic systems have proven to be quite efficient and show great results...if there was a way to combine organic nute lines that weren't sludgy and clog up reservoirs and some solar powered lights, then that would be a dope eco-friendly route to go. But LED grow lights haven't really impressed me right now, solar powered cells can be faulty and hydroponic systems work well with synthetic nutrients so we still have a ways to go.

If they used black film instead of clear film they would probably have bigger plants because it's known that root systems don't like contact with light.
They're developing efficient solar cells that can be made with inkjet printers. Things have a way to go, but with time I think we'll be able to grow plants anywhere. I see what you're saying with organic and biodegradable, but as long as the film is reusable that should be good enough for now, as long as they don't produce too much of it.
 

quik1987

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Originally Posted by eiddyfouw

Why use it in Africa when many places in Africa have very rich soil?
the film protects the plants from harmful bacteria and is effective in times of drought as well.
 

mrbrown

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Seems like a bag of water

very interesting concept

weed growing comes to mind
 
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I read something about this sifting through PubMed awhile ago. I think the film is some sort of microsilica composite...
 
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Originally Posted by quik1987

Originally Posted by eiddyfouw

Why use it in Africa when many places in Africa have very rich soil?
the film protects the plants from harmful bacteria and is effective in times of drought as well.
Gotcha...thanks
 
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