The American Bison is the freakiest looking animal in the world..

5,874
11
Joined Nov 22, 2007
SMH @ someone putting the finger pic

i've seen all types of crazy pics online but nothing irks me like that pic.
 

nyvictory45

Banned
685
10
Joined Apr 1, 2004
"Cymothoa exigua, or the tongue-eating louse, is a parasitic crustacean of the family Cymothoidae. It tends to be 3 to 4 centimetres (1.2 to 1.6 in) long. This parasite enters through the gills, and then attaches itself at the base of the spotted rose snapper's (Lutjanus guttatus) tongue. It extracts blood through the claws on its front, causing the tongue to atrophy from lack of blood. The parasite then replaces the fish's tongue by attaching its own body to the muscles of the tongue stub. The fish is able to use the parasite just like a normal tongue. It appears that the parasite does not cause any other damage to the host fish [1]. Once C. exigua replaces the tongue, some feed on the host's blood and many others feed on fish mucus. This is the only known case of a parasite functionally replacing a host organ [1]. It is currently believed that C. exigua are not harmful to humans unless picked up alive, in which case they can bite [2]."

That %+$ is crazy.
 
14,392
243
Joined Feb 5, 2009
If that horrible looking long neck turtle ever got hit with the Ooze it would body your 4 favorite turtles!
What's the deal with that finger pic though?Details?
 

black leg

formerly shaqtus92
3,962
265
Joined Feb 15, 2009
Originally Posted by NYVictory45

"Cymothoa exigua, or the tongue-eating louse, is a parasitic crustacean of the family Cymothoidae. It tends to be 3 to 4 centimetres (1.2 to 1.6 in) long. This parasite enters through the gills, and then attaches itself at the base of the spotted rose snapper's (Lutjanus guttatus) tongue. It extracts blood through the claws on its front, causing the tongue to atrophy from lack of blood. The parasite then replaces the fish's tongue by attaching its own body to the muscles of the tongue stub. The fish is able to use the parasite just like a normal tongue. It appears that the parasite does not cause any other damage to the host fish [1]. Once C. exigua replaces the tongue, some feed on the host's blood and many others feed on fish mucus. This is the only known case of a parasite functionally replacing a host organ [1]. It is currently believed that C. exigua are not harmful to humans unless picked up alive, in which case they can bite [2]."

That %+$ is crazy.
$%$# nature, you scary!!!...

  
 
5,339
11
Joined Aug 7, 2005
Oh yall postin them deep sea creatures huh?

Spoiler [+]
*exits thread*
 
8,875
2,708
Joined Jul 26, 2008
Originally Posted by shaqtus92

Originally Posted by NYVictory45

"Cymothoa exigua, or the tongue-eating louse, is a parasitic crustacean of the family Cymothoidae. It tends to be 3 to 4 centimetres (1.2 to 1.6 in) long. This parasite enters through the gills, and then attaches itself at the base of the spotted rose snapper's (Lutjanus guttatus) tongue. It extracts blood through the claws on its front, causing the tongue to atrophy from lack of blood. The parasite then replaces the fish's tongue by attaching its own body to the muscles of the tongue stub. The fish is able to use the parasite just like a normal tongue. It appears that the parasite does not cause any other damage to the host fish [1]. Once C. exigua replaces the tongue, some feed on the host's blood and many others feed on fish mucus. This is the only known case of a parasite functionally replacing a host organ [1]. It is currently believed that C. exigua are not harmful to humans unless picked up alive, in which case they can bite [2]."

That %+$ is crazy.
$%$# nature, you scary!!!...

  
just imagine having that as your tongue though. you'll be on some Aliens-type mess.

 
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