Would you go see a Doctor at Walmart?

Will the medical field be seen as less glamourous if your job prospects are working at a Wal Mart?


  • Total voters
    27
66,652
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Joined Aug 1, 2004
the long play is actually Doctors having to work for a corporation because it will be too expensive to practice independently.
 
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Joined Feb 6, 2011
They already have pharmacists and optometrists so don't see why not.

Now surgeons on the other hand, that would be a whole another story.
 
6,958
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Joined Jul 18, 2012
Some doctors just want to work. It's just like any other field. You get trained for something and you want to put it to use. Not all of them gonna reach the major leagues. I used to not have insurance and so I had to go to this low budget clinic ran out of a classroom trailer in the back of an elementary school. $50 gets you seen by a doctor. Not the best doctor. I wanted to get an x-ray or MRI for some Achilles pain and the doctor, who wasn't much older than me, was using her phone to Google ****. She told me to ice it and take magnesium. I asked which form of magnesium and she went back to her phone. You also have doctors who made mistakes (malpractice, DUI, etc) and they get relegated to working at some crappy government funded clinic. So when you ask if it's glamorous to be a Walmart doctor, I would ask what that salary like? We all want a competitive salary, job security, and family benefits at the end of the day. I could give two ****s if my friends see me working at Walmart as a doctor while they're buying Oreos and socks.
 

superblytrife

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What’s stupid is that doctors are getting paid over 200,000 And screwing over the everyday people.

they have the power to make change in healthcare but they choose not too.
If u know anyone in the medical industry u know they are not getting underpaid
LOL @ doctors being the problem.
 
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Joined Aug 5, 2017
Again...zero distinction between practices. A plastic surgeon or an orthopedist can make over $500K/year, but a lot of the non procedure-driven specialties and general practice MDs earn way less.

Basically any doctor I've spoken to at my job says there's absolutely no financial incentive to be a general practitioner anymore. You'll probably make very low six figures, work about 80 hours a week between office hours, time in hospitals, nursing homes/rehabs/assisted living centers/etc., you get constant phone calls at all hours where you need to make important decisions and do them quickly, as well as a bunch of pointless phone calls interrupting your sleep all of the time. It's a big part of the reason why you're seeing more urgent care clinics and less private practices.

If you think the docs hold the power in their hands to completely reform our healthcare system you're beyond naive. You're even more naive if you think they're the ones responsible for "screwing" us over. Most of the doctors I deal with are disgusted with the penny-pinching administrators and insurance companies, but their hands are tied.
how are their hands tied?

they have the power the same way the union is holding general motor by the balls right now
you have absolutely NO idea. NONE. it's a shame people from the outside looking in may see it this way. Comparison Ford hit it right on the head.
I work with doctors on a professional level and the past 9 months have seen 3/4 doctors for personal issues and I see how
LOL @ doctors being the problem.
I didn’t say they were the problem, please read correctly.
I said they have the power to make changes
 

Mark Antony

Supporter
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Joined Apr 30, 2010
One question is, would a MD want to work at Walmart?

Having this on your resume could be career suicide if you eventually want to be an attending, chief, or interviewing to head a clinical trial.
Working under a huge backer and not worry about funding as much as a smaller place? I see plenty making the move.
 
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how are their hands tied?

they have the power the same way the union is holding general motor by the balls right now
Docs can't even override the policies of administrators and insurance companies, you really think they're the ones that hold the power in their hands?
 
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I have medicare and medi-cal so if that doctor at walmart was where they assigned me then I have to go. Unless that doctor is just terrible then I'll call and change my pcp (primary care provider)
 
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Joined Dec 13, 2014
This. They’ll probably get paid pretty well (comparatively), get benefits/malpractice insurance covered, and have none of the overhead costs of running a private practice.

Walmart pharmacists make bank.
Do they really? Plenty of pharmacies hire them part-time so they don't have to pay benefits.
 
1,108
765
Joined Dec 13, 2014
Again...zero distinction between practices. A plastic surgeon or an orthopedist can make over $500K/year, but a lot of the non procedure-driven specialties and general practice MDs earn way less.

Basically any doctor I've spoken to at my job says there's absolutely no financial incentive to be a general practitioner anymore. You'll probably make very low six figures, work about 80 hours a week between office hours, time in hospitals, nursing homes/rehabs/assisted living centers/etc., you get constant phone calls at all hours where you need to make important decisions and do them quickly, as well as a bunch of pointless phone calls interrupting your sleep all of the time. It's a big part of the reason why you're seeing more urgent care clinics and less private practices.

If you think the docs hold the power in their hands to completely reform our healthcare system you're beyond naive. You're even more naive if you think they're the ones responsible for "screwing" us over. Most of the doctors I deal with are disgusted with the penny-pinching administrators and insurance companies, but their hands are tied.
Hospital admins and the government have power over the average provider. They have 15 minutes with most patients and if they go over hospital admins will start asking questions. If you are not a specialist, I wouldn't do it.
 
9,180
3,805
Joined Mar 5, 2008
Again...zero distinction between practices. A plastic surgeon or an orthopedist can make over $500K/year, but a lot of the non procedure-driven specialties and general practice MDs earn way less.

Basically any doctor I've spoken to at my job says there's absolutely no financial incentive to be a general practitioner anymore. You'll probably make very low six figures, work about 80 hours a week between office hours, time in hospitals, nursing homes/rehabs/assisted living centers/etc., you get constant phone calls at all hours where you need to make important decisions and do them quickly, as well as a bunch of pointless phone calls interrupting your sleep all of the time. It's a big part of the reason why you're seeing more urgent care clinics and less private practices.

If you think the docs hold the power in their hands to completely reform our healthcare system you're beyond naive. You're even more naive if you think they're the ones responsible for "screwing" us over. Most of the doctors I deal with are disgusted with the penny-pinching administrators and insurance companies, but their hands are tied.
This guy knows whats he talking about.

For example in California. Most pcp will have to deal with medi-cal because that's just the nature of it. For medi-cal patients the doctor is going to get paid capitation. That means one life/person is going to get you less than $10/month. Because it's medi-cal that patient can go to the doctor 100 times a month and the doctor is still getting paid just $10 once a month for that one patient. Pcp doctors are really getting paid pennies. They're worse off than tradies
 
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Joined Aug 31, 2012
bruh, if doctors strike the administrators and insurance companies are at their mercy.
do you comprehend that or no?
57004929_10157096333143431_7454740298619420672_n.jpg


Let's overlook the ethical dilemma of the concept of doctors "going on strike" for a second and talk about the logistics of what you just said.

The VAST majority of doctors aren't unionized. They're private contractors, and without union protection or protection of federal regulation they basically have no leverage. Doctors also have to worry about their reputations and their clientele. They really don't have anyone to back them up, so they rely on themselves to provide the care that their patients need.

You could make your argument for just about any profession, but you know that's not true. If the nurses strike, is hospital administration at their mercy, or do they just find replacements? A good chunk of nurses are in unions and the end result is that the organizations find temporary replacements while the nurses ultimately receive marginal gains through the union.
 
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Joined Aug 5, 2017
57004929_10157096333143431_7454740298619420672_n.jpg


Let's overlook the ethical dilemma of the concept of doctors "going on strike" for a second and talk about the logistics of what you just said.

The VAST majority of doctors aren't unionized. They're private contractors, and without union protection or protection of federal regulation they basically have no leverage. Doctors also have to worry about their reputations and their clientele. They really don't have anyone to back them up, so they rely on themselves to provide the care that their patients need.

You could make your argument for just about any profession, but you know that's not true. If the nurses strike, is hospital administration at their mercy, or do they just find replacements? A good chunk of nurses are in unions and the end result is that the organizations find temporary replacements while the nurses ultimately receive marginal gains through the union.
if doctors really wanted to change the industry they could.

who owns and runs all the healthcare organizations? doctors
 

Air Money

formerly sneekaz
11,156
11,733
Joined Mar 30, 2006
Some doctors just want to work. It's just like any other field. You get trained for something and you want to put it to use. Not all of them gonna reach the major leagues. I used to not have insurance and so I had to go to this low budget clinic ran out of a classroom trailer in the back of an elementary school. $50 gets you seen by a doctor. Not the best doctor. I wanted to get an x-ray or MRI for some Achilles pain and the doctor, who wasn't much older than me, was using her phone to Google ****. She told me to ice it and take magnesium. I asked which form of magnesium and she went back to her phone. You also have doctors who made mistakes (malpractice, DUI, etc) and they get relegated to working at some crappy government funded clinic. So when you ask if it's glamorous to be a Walmart doctor, I would ask what that salary like? We all want a competitive salary, job security, and family benefits at the end of the day. I could give two ****s if my friends see me working at Walmart as a doctor while they're buying Oreos and socks.
what if I needed a referral?
 
380
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Joined Oct 29, 2002
if doctors really wanted to change the industry they could.

who owns and runs all the healthcare organizations? doctors
in what capacity do you work with physicians? i am a physician, and reading your comments just leaves me in disbelief. however, i do understand that this is not uncommon thinking for the general public. your argument of, "if doctors want to do it then they can. thats it and that's all, and i'm covering my ears now" is very simple, naive, and, most importantly, incorrect. there's really no point in furthering the discussion
 
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