You're a GM. What's your philosophy?

Discussion in 'Sports & Training' started by 651akathepaul, Dec 22, 2012.

  1. 651akathepaul

    651akathepaul

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    I know there are more than a few on this board who have insightful ideas and opinions that pertain to the many different realms and nuances of sports, so I want to call unto those that have the same passion as mine.

    If you're a General Manager for a professional team, what would be your philosophy for building that team? Don't hesitate to be creative. It can be your favorite team, it can be a team that sucks that you need to completely redefine its culture, or a team that is a perennial power and you need to keep things going (though not as fun as starting fresh). You can answer them all if you want and for all sports.

    I will start and I'll post about building a baseball team from scratch first, since many might go with football or basketball. I want variety!

    My philosophy would be to completely stockpile the farm system. I wouldn't dare put a time frame of when success will happen because I know that it may take longer than hoped for when you are trying to develop future stars. I would stay away from the Yankees model of signing new studs to replace the aging star. Big contracts are a no-no on my team unless that player came up through our system or later on in the building process where this one player may be the difference in winning a WS. Just not out of the gates when so many holes will still have to be filled.

    I would find a coach that stresses fundamentals and the art of "creating" runs. Absolute crisp baseball that has its players almost look mechanical with how fluent they are with knowing the game..Specifically on the defensive end.

    Models I would use would be the teams like the Twins of the early 2000's as well as the Angels from that same time. The Oakland A's and the Florida Marlins (both WS years).

    The key is to get as much youth as possible and let the best work themselves to the top. After however many years it takes to get enough young talent that is producing then the next step would be to sprinkle in veterans who each bring something to the table. Grab a guy or two that does a great job of leading players. Will need veteran players who fill a void on the team or in specific areas it may be struggling. Be it a power bat in the middle of the lineup, a slick fielding shortstop, or a very good leadoff hitter. It'll be at a point where you can't wait for a player in the minors to develop and at a time where it just may put the team over the top.

    This can go even deeper as in finding specific arms for your rotation/bullpen and what type of players you want at respective positions. Maybe I'll get into that later, but I wanna see how this thread goes first.

    Let's have fun with this. Could be very interesting and insightful.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2012
  2. hybridsoldier23

    hybridsoldier23

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    Paging Essential1...
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2012
  3. th3realf0lkblu3s

    th3realf0lkblu3s

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    Tagged to post in future.
     
  4. CP1708

    CP1708

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    The Draft. Never, ever miss. Scout HEAVILY no matter the sport and know every single player.

    If a player develops but you don't feel title ready with him, flip him for added assets. Never fall in love with an 8, only keep the 10's.

    Anybody can be traded to a point. If they are the face of your team and drive your market, keep them, if they start to decline and you can get high value for them, do it. Never make a panic move just to do "something".

    Make damn sure your coach sees things the way you do. No added hassle, complaints, bickering. Agree on players, moves, goals.

    Always go for key spots.
    DE, CB, QB, OT.
    C, PG.
    Pitching, CF, SS, strength up the middle.

    Never ignore those areas. If you have to reach in a draft, reach those positions and hope you get lucky. Better to have too many of those than not enough.

    I'm sure I'm forgetting some, but my main point is Draft. #1 easy.
     
  5. sohi 23

    sohi 23

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    Draft and scouting is all I'd invest in.

    NFL: the game is won in the trenches. I want a good offensive line and a beast defensive line equipped with pass rushers off the edge.
    I feel like skill players are changeable for the most part (other than like QB or something). I would invest heavily on signing and scouting UDFAs.

    NBA: stink til you get a star. That's pretty much it. Hitting on your lottery selections is mandatory or else you'll be fired. Rookie contracts are the best.

    MLB: I'm building thru the draft and going with pitching/bullpen/defense. Word to the SF Giants.
     
  6. 651akathepaul

    651akathepaul

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    Definitely agree with this. I would start with the D-Line unless I were able to get a top QB in the draft. If I did then I'd invest heavily to keep him protected then build the D-Line next.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2012
  7. mmg

    mmg

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    NFL since thats the only sport that really interests me.


    Build thru the draft, i know its said time and time again, but build talent with scouting.

    OL and DL being priorities.

    Good Defensive line play can hide deficiencies in the LBs and Secondary

    Good offensive line play can make an average RB excel and give more time and protection to a young QB.

    never waste a high draft pick on RBs, value can always be found in the 2nd round and later and with good Oline play that would also help.

    high 1st round picks on QBs / WRs for offense

    DE and DB for Defense.


    have at least one pro bowler on every level on defense ( DL / LB / DB )

    as for offense when i go QB with a high pick, get him a TE, young QB best friend is a sure handed TE.


    thats all for now.
     
  8. 651akathepaul

    651akathepaul

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    Very true.
     
  9. th3realf0lkblu3s

    th3realf0lkblu3s

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    NBA:
    -Starting big first, grabbing the best possible center or power forward available. Someone who can defend, rebound and position himself for high quality/efficient shots.
    -Grabbing a traditional point guard next. Can pass, defend, organize the court for the right play, shoots only when he knows he's the best option left or can penetrate for a high percentage shot.
    -The team will probably be terrible at first without a scoring threat at SG or length and/or athleticism at SF, so I'm going to identify the best options available on the market and offer what I can that's on my roster for a player who's reliable in some aspects of his game. I'll utilize his strengths and have him showcase those as much as possible, in the hopes that he can be used in future trade talks with GMs who are valuing that particular skill. He'll probably be a starter on my weak team, but is a bench player on most contenders.
    -Draft day: best player available, hopefully at a position of need. I won't give up my draft picks unless I'm floored by an offer. It'll likely take at least a couple of drafts to get players who will develop and make a serious impression on the team (assuming these players pan out, which obviously is the point).
    -Make the D-League affiliate a place for real development. Hire a young, ambitious coach that needs to prove himself and give him players who are a tool or two away from being contributing players on the NBA level. As in baseball, develop a winning culture throughout the organization.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2012
  10. nationaltruckerdave

    nationaltruckerdave

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    Great, a thread dedicated to the wannabe GM's of NT S&T
     
  11. rck2sactown

    rck2sactown

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    If I'm the GM of the Lakers I'd just demand the best players possible.
     
  12. 651akathepaul

    651akathepaul

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    Nothing wrong with that, baby!
     
  13. essential1

    essential1

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    Mitch cosigns this point....



    As for the thread at hand:
    It all depends.. You rarely get to start from scratch... So it's hard to make that definitive statement because you'll always have that kind of impediment to building a roster.

    But say I'm starting from scratch....

    I'm not a big draft guy. For every Thunder, or Spurs you have the perpetual lottery teams that get high picks and keep building and furthest they get is a weak playoff contention. You have to be a master to win big year after year in the draft, even one bad pick could set you back a few years. Say after drafting KD then WB, the Thunder missed with Ibaka or Harden. They wouldn't have been contenders. Say you hit on someone, you always run the risk of losing those guys at some point. Especially if they are solid role players, that someone wants to gamble money on. You then have to replace that guy, and as opposed to pick 13,14. You are now at pick 24, 25.

    If I'm starting at a zero sum.. I go after 2 max players... A scorer and a post presence.

    Then I go after a decent offensive PG, who is solid defensively. More so on the defensive side, because you don't want to get killed by quick PG. Then a bigger SF, who can use his length to slow down SF, and in small stretches play a 4.

    Then I spend a consider amount on a 6th man who can create his own shot.

    And go after a couple younger talent that have 1 solid area of their game (they are typically low cost guys), and hope to sign them to longer contracts with the hope that they start to round out their game. And round out the roster with some vets that are for leadership/stability.

    Everything else is all a game of chance.. And you scout the draft looking for late 1st Round Steals.

    You really only need to build a roster for 10. Not many teams go over a rotation of over 10.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2012
  14. madj55

    madj55

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    Doesn't matter what team I'm building, no player gets a no-trade clause in his contract.
     
  15. pmatic

    pmatic

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    NBA:
    I'm putting a premium on long, athletic and versatile players.
    If I can't acquire a superstar, I'll take my lumps.
    I'm developing homegrown talent for the long-term.
    I'm avoiding spending considerable amounts of money in free agency like the plague.
    I'll take maybe one dude with character issues.
    I'm scouting all over the world.
    I'm developing the advanced metrics department to get as much information as possible.
    I'm in constant contact with ownership and coaches to ensure we're all on the same page.
     
  16. mac4167

    mac4167

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    I would eliminate big market teams from building these super teams. Creates a unfair and unbalanced league.

    Also I would eliminate players from dictating what teams they will and will not play for.
     
  17. 651akathepaul

    651akathepaul

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    Probably can't do this as a GM, but I agree.
     
  18. 6 rings mj

    6 rings mj

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    Posting 4 later..
     
  19. mac4167

    mac4167

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    But if I can get all the other GM's on board and present it to the league officials, I am sure something would change.
     
  20. pmatic

    pmatic

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    No, you wouldn't.