adidas INTELLIGENT b-ball shoe (tons of pics) - check it out

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Joined Jun 12, 2004









World's first intelligent basketball shoe​








Heel shot


The outsole


Gears, magnets, cables, motor, computer brain and others... all working to create the perfect cushioning for the player on court


The "1"


Intelligence. The cushioning revolution has begun.



Enjoy the pics!
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79
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Joined Jun 12, 2006
Here were a couple of my pics from the old post...

Here is the pic of the shoe that was already posted, but with labled numbers to show you where each detailed pic is located.





1-




2-



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5-

 
112
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Joined Feb 3, 2005
if it feels like the runner it will be an easy pass. Thanks for sharing the pics and the info.

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51
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Joined Jun 12, 2004
Quote:[hr][/hr]
how does it work?

just press + or - to adjust the cushioning?
[hr][/hr]

Read this,
Quote:[hr][/hr] Herzogenaurch, Germany/New York, November 20, 2005

adidas Introduces the Worlds First Intelligent Basketball Shoe
Today, adidas has introduced the worlds first intelligent basketball shoe. The shoe, called adidas_1 Basketball, features the award-winning technology that is revolutionizing the sporting goods industry.
The shoe provides intelligent cushioning, meaning it finds the right level of cushioning whatever the players size or movement. It senses an athlete's needs, understands those needs, and instantly adapts itself to be perfect for the player.

The adidas_1 Basketball shoe works on the same principles as the adidas_1 Running shoe. A magnetic sensor in the heel senses the level of compression. This compression level is sent to the shoes brain, a microprocessor that understands if the cushioning level is too soft or too firm. And a motor-driven cable system adapts the cushioning, to make the shoe softer or firmer as needed. The basketball model has been uploaded with new software along with changed physical characteristics to meet the needs of the sport.

Besides the normal differences between running and basketball shoes in outsole and upper materials, the components of the intelligent system are changed to meet the specific needs of the sport. They remain positioned in the heel and midfoot of the shoe. This is because while many players land, cut and plant with their toes, the forces generated when the heel contacts the floor cause some of the greatest overcompression. The basketball cushioning element and midsole have a lower profile than the running model, and the layout of the motor cable unit and processor is streamlined to fit the space.

The shoe recognizes different kinds of compression associated with basketball, such as: even, regular compressions for running; quick, extreme compressions for jumping and landing; longer, extreme compressions for cutting. It filters all the data and develops a player profile, meaning it knows if you are a player who does more running and cutting, or a player that does more jumping and landing. Once it recognizes your style, it adjusts more quickly when you go from running to cutting, or from jumping to running. Adjustments happen continuously throughout the game.
.

Using the adidas_1 Basketball shoe is simple. Just switch it on and play. The shoe accounts for all stoppage in play to conserve battery life. If the heel experiences no compression for five minutes, the shoe goes to standby mode. One of the lights on the shoe blinks to let you know the shoe is resting, but not off. It keeps checking for activity, and, if the heel compresses again, it wakes up and goes back into play mode. If there is no compression after two hours, it moves to a softer setting and switches itself off, or chill mode. When switched on, it gets firmer to protect against extreme movements.

The shoe will be available in limited quantities in the U.S. in May, with a global introduction in August, 2006. It retails for $250 and will be sold through adidas Sports Performance store and selected retailers.

[hr][/hr]
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51
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Joined Mar 6, 2004
I know that it's nice to see advanced technology being incorporated in shoes but to have it priced at $250 is just a bit too much. Sure new technologies are priced higher for companies have invested thousands...maybe even million on developing them, but to pay $250 for a pair of hoops shoes that will probably have the same life as any decent quality basketball shoes.

The idea is nice but the price is absurd. That's just my opinion. Anyone who owns the Adidas 1 feel like they are just as nice or maybe even not as good as non-electronic running shoes?
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51
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Joined Jun 12, 2004
Quote:[hr][/hr] Anyone who owns the Adidas 1 feel like they are just as nice or maybe even not as good as non-electronic running shoes? [hr][/hr]
I actually purchased the adidas 1 (running shoe) myself. Imho, the cushioning of the shoe cannot be compared with any other shoe. None of the other shoes (of any brands) I've tested to this date, are even close in terms of the cushioning feel and the impact protection.
Heck, a lot of retro limited shoes with no specialty (other than color/material) have similar price tags too and they don't offer any real benefit for a performance-minded person like me. So I think the high price can be justified.

I can why a lot of people think the "1" is worth the high price tag though.

But then again, most people never even ran in the "1" so they won't even know how they feel... and I think commenting if they're worth the price tag or not, without testing out the "1" is unfair. Just like how people really have to get hands on electronics and experienced the product before they can review it...
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361
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Joined Feb 11, 2001
Quote:[hr][/hr]to pay $250 for a pair of hoops shoes that will probably have the as any decent quality basketball shoes.[hr][/hr]
That's what I was thinking when I was reading the article. A pair of $250 Adidas_1's will most likely have similar performance as say, a pair of $75 Promodels if you're a 4 or 5(around $50 now with discount at Easbay), and most definitely similar lifespan (12-18 months, tops, if you hoop regularly). A more practical idea, however, is probably to have the same exact material and design (I really like the design; it flows really well, definitely top-notch work. The upper itself, at least the pearl white-colored portion of it, if using a foamposite-like material, will definitely make the shoe a good big-men's shoe. Adidas has also found a killer color combo in pearl white/gold-silver), only make it strictly an adiprene+ (forefoot), torsion and a3 (heel) shoe. Adidas can probably effectively price this shoe (call it the a3 Duncan, maybe??) at the $100-125 range and they will probably sell pretty well (but then that's too Nike-like), I know I would def. buy a pair.
 
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Joined Oct 13, 2000
I see the technology working much better for running than basketball. Maybe I need to reread the linked article, but it just seems with the difference in needed cushioning in basketball, and the quickness of a stop, cut, jump, etc., it won't be able to "know" what is next, etc. Looks wise, not bad, but I like the design for the runner once again better. A step towards the future though, that is for sure
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Joined Dec 9, 2005
Quote:[hr][/hr]Using the adidas_1 Basketball shoe is simple. Just switch it on and play. The shoe accounts for all stoppage in play to conserve battery life. If the heel experiences no compression for five minutes, the shoe goes to standby mode. One of the lights on the shoe blinks to let you know the shoe is resting, but not off. It keeps checking for activity, and, if the heel compresses again, it wakes up and goes back into play mode. If there is no compression after two hours, it moves to a softer setting and switches itself off, or chill mode. [hr][/hr]
I wished the Adidas 1 running shoe would go to "standby mode" which it does after 10 minutes but it sure doesn't have the feature of switching itself off after two hours.
 
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Joined Jul 16, 2001
Quote:[hr][/hr]I see the technology working much better for running than basketball. Maybe I need to reread the linked article, but it just seems with the difference in needed cushioning in basketball, and the quickness of a stop, cut, jump, etc., it won't be able to "know" what is next, etc. Looks wise, not bad, but I like the design for the runner once again better. A step towards the future though, that is for sure[hr][/hr]


Now finally someone is talking sense!! The technology senses your movements and cushioning needs from your first step, then adjusts the cushioning to suit your needs and the conditions. EX: If you are running on concrete, the first step you make, the computer reads the forces, then adjusts the cushioning to suit. So by your second step it is adjusted to meet the needs of concrete. If you then switch to trail, your first step on trail will be different, and the computer will sense that and adjust the cushion to suit by your second step! That is how it works. And the technology is ONLY IN THE HEEL! When you cut in basketball, you cut on your toes, not on your heel. Not only do you cut on your toes, the cutting movement is only once at a time! Think about it, when do you repeatedly cut? NEVER! You cut, then you run, then you cut again. So what adidas is claiming is not true.

The only continuous movement in basketball is running. That is the only movement that is repeated at one time. When do you repeatedly jump in one spot? Maybe on a rebound, but that is the point; once you jump and the computer adjusts the cushioning for jumping, you are already starting to run. And cutting doesn't apply, because you cut on your toes. If they are saying that the computer stores all your info and then finds the optimum HEEL cushioning for a specific player, then what is the difference between putting zoom air in a shoe for guards, or putting encapsulated air in a shoe for centers? To me it is bogus. It ONLY applys to running, because the technology is in the HEEL and running is the only continuous/ repeated movement at one time.

As well for the design: how could you design one shoe for 5 positions? A guard shoe should be light and sleak looking, and a "bigs" shoes should be more supportive. To me that shoe is a "Bigs" shoe. It is not "sexy" enough for a guard. Look what it has to compete against; Jordans, Flight VC, and so on, and to me it doesn't.

So to me, great technology for RUNNING. Absolutely amazing for RUNNING. But it doesn't apply to b-ball, or any court sport for that matter.

What do you guys think?

Peace.
 
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Joined Jan 23, 2004
awful shoe. tecnology was pretty poor in the initial running shoe. this basketball version won't be much better.
 
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Joined Feb 28, 2006
DO THESE RUN ON BATTARIES OR SOMETHING ? LOL
WHATS THE RD?
I DON'T COLLECT JAY'S I WEAR THEM.
 
361
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Joined Feb 11, 2001
^^^Anybody got any info. on those shorts (and sleeveless) and what they are called (price, where to cop)??? Thanks for the info.!!!!
 
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Joined Mar 28, 2004
Quote:[hr][/hr]I see the technology working much better for running than basketball. Maybe I need to reread the linked article, but it just seems with the difference in needed cushioning in basketball, and the quickness of a stop, cut, jump, etc., it won't be able to "know" what is next, etc. Looks wise, not bad, but I like the design for the runner once again better. A step towards the future though, that is for sure[hr][/hr]

Playing basketball for 10 years now, I totally agree. We cut back and forth and do movements we don't even know were going to do. But I hope I'm wrong and the shoe works wonders, that'd be great.


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92
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Joined Apr 8, 2005
The whole concept is gimmick. Neither it will work properly, nor those are going to be a good shoe. Adabtable cushioning for bball requires some PREDICATIONAL system, which can't be realised nowadays. Maybe if shoe costs 5000$...
It CAN be good for running, but no way for basketball.
 
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