Building Credit

274
10
Joined Jul 31, 2007
I just turned 18 a week ago and ive been looking for a credit card that i can get so that i can build credit ASAP. Any cards that you guys know of that willgive a card to a 18 year old with no credit and doesnt have an annual fee or possibly any other ways i can help get good credit?? Thanks in advance.
 
8,095
529
Joined Sep 1, 2007
get yourself a secured credit card first. You use your money as collateral basically and then charge and pay on the card like a normal cc.

credit.com
bankrate.com
 
1,603
697
Joined Sep 6, 2006
sign up for a Macys card. they accept anyone & just buy and pay them as soon as the bill comes. thats how i started my credit
 
9,869
2,692
Joined Oct 28, 2006
Try to get a store card first like Macys, Old Navy, or even BP....

If you don't want to do that though Capital One usually gives anyone a card....the limit would probably be like $500 though....or go to your bank and askthem about a card...basically don't buy anything if you don't have the money to pay off the bill when it comes....
 
274
10
Joined Jul 31, 2007
Originally Posted by AntBanks81

get yourself a secured credit card first. You use your money as collateral basically and then charge and pay on the card like a normal cc.

credit.com
bankrate.com
whats a secured credit card?? all i see on those websites are credit cards with annual fees and debit cards.
 
274
10
Joined Jul 31, 2007
Originally Posted by jrp44

Try to get a store card first like Macys, Old Navy, or even BP....

If you don't want to do that though Capital One usually gives anyone a card....the limit would probably be like $500 though....or go to your bank and ask them about a card...basically don't buy anything if you don't have the money to pay off the bill when it comes....

capital one just declined me
 

mac a roni

Banned
3,420
10
Joined Feb 2, 2009
Originally Posted by realtalkitsDC

^^ya but can the macy's card be used in places other than macys??
[color= rgb(102, 0, 153)]i think you need to build their credit 1st....but if you dont have the $$$ dont bother, makesure[/color]


[color= rgb(102, 0, 153)]i got 2 cards, 2 jobs and honestly went out on a online shopping spree and been kicking myself in the$*% since...used it and paid it off but then slacked...1k a month and 2k to pay off[/color]
 
8,095
529
Joined Sep 1, 2007
Originally Posted by realtalkitsDC

Originally Posted by AntBanks81

get yourself a secured credit card first. You use your money as collateral basically and then charge and pay on the card like a normal cc.

credit.com
bankrate.com
whats a secured credit card?? all i see on those websites are credit cards with annual fees and debit cards.
[table][tr][td] [h1]Secured Visa[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup] Credit Card[/h1] [/td] [td]Site-Specific Help in a New Window[/td] [/tr][/table]
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[/td] [/tr][tr][td]Build or rebuild a solid credit history[/td] [/tr][tr][td]
[/td] [/tr][tr][td] [table][tr][td]Credit lines available from $300 to $10,000[/td] [/tr][/table][/td] [/tr][tr][td][/td] [/tr][tr][td] [/td] [/tr][tr][td]
[/td] [/tr][tr][td] [table][tr][td] [table][tr][td]http://www1.bankofamerica.com/creditcards/application/?offer_id=ECOMM090XFEQ00400800121983EN001&requestTimeout=120]
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[/td] [/tr][tr][td] [h3]Card at a glance[/h3] [/td] [/tr][tr][td]
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[/td] [/tr][/table][/td] [td][/td] [/tr][/table][table][tr][td]Who it′s for:[/td] [td]Individuals interested in building or improving their credit[/td] [/tr][tr][td]Annual Fee:[/td] [td]$29[sup]†[/sup][/td] [/tr][tr][td]Standard APR:[/td] [td]14.24% Variable APR[sup]†[/sup]

Standard APR applies to purchases and balance transfers. See Terms and Conditions for Standard APR for cash advances.[/td] [/tr][tr][td]Balance Transfer fee:[/td] [td]4% of each transfer (Min $10, Max $90)[sup]†[/sup][/td] [/tr][tr][td]
† Please see Terms and Conditions for rate, fee, and other cost information. All terms, including the APRs and fees, are subject to change at any time, for any reason, in accordance with the Credit Card Agreement and applicable law.
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[/td] [/tr][/table][/td] [/tr][/table][table][tr][td] [h3]How Secured Card works[/h3]
  • Helps you establish a credit history that will benefit you now and in the future.
  • You deposit anywhere from $300 up to $10,000 into a Bank of America security deposit account. Your credit line will directly reflect the amount of your deposit.
  • Then make purchases with your card up to the amount you have in your security deposit account.
  • Pay at least the minimum payment before the due date each month. Paying off your credit card balance in full each month instead of carrying a balance may help. Your security deposit does not cover minimum payments.
  • Based on your credit and payment history with your secured card, you may qualify for an unsecured card at a later date.
[/td] [/tr][/table][/td] [/tr][/table][/td] [/tr][/table]http://www.credit.com/products/credit_cards/secure.jsp

questions before getting a secured credit card
By Pat Curry • Bankrate.com

Credit cards are a fact of life.

You need one to make a hotel or plane reservation, or to rent a car, even if you plan to pay cash. Many stores require a credit card to accept your check. Responsible use of a credit card builds a good credit rating, too, marking the owner as mortgage-worthy.

But people who have never had credit or need to repair a poor credit history may not qualify for a regular credit card. For them, a secured credit card may be the only way to establish, or re-establish, credit.

10 questions to ask about secured credit cards:

  1. What is a secured credit card?
  2. Where can I get a secured credit card?
  3. What kind of charges will there be?
  4. How much money do I have to deposit?
  5. Do all banks offer secured credit cards?
  6. Are there any problems to watch out for?
  7. Do you report to all three major credit bureaus?
  8. How long does it take to qualify for an unsecured card?
  9. How much interest will my deposit earn?
  10. How can I make the best use of a secured card to build my credit rating?

If you're in that boat, here are the answers to the top 10 questions about secured credit cards.

1. What is a secured credit card?
A secured card requires a cash collateral deposit that becomes the credit line for that account. For example, if you put $500 in the account; you can charge up to $500. You may be able to add to the deposit to add more credit, or sometimes a bank will reward you for good payment and add to your credit line without requesting additional deposits.

2. Where can I get a secured credit card?
Check Bankrate.com's list of secured credit card issuers. If you're a credit union member, ask about a secured card there. About half of the nation's credit unions offer secured cards to their members and may offer lower interest rates and waive annual fees.

3. What kind of charges will there be?
This is where it pays to shop around. Look for a card that doesn't charge an application fee. Every secured card charges an annual fee, and they vary dramatically. Read the fine print. Some people have gotten secured cards and found their entire limit consumed with fees before they ever used the card.

4. How much money do I have to deposit?
Again, the amount will vary by the card. Most are $300 to $500. Your credit limit will either be the amount of your deposit or some percentage above that amount.

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5. Do all banks offer secured credit cards ?
No. Linda Sherry, editorial director of Consumer Action, says her organization is seeing a trend in banking away from secured cards and toward unsecured cards with lower limits and higher interest rates and fees. Still, secured cards are a good choice -- and sometimes the only option -- for people who are just starting out or rebuilding after a major life event, such as a divorce, job loss or serious illness. In addition, some issuers only give secured cards to people who are new to credit -- not those who have already had one crack and blown it.

6. Are there any problems to watch out for?
Yes. Howard Dvorkin, president of Consolidated Credit Counseling Services Inc. in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., a nonprofit organization that helps people get out of debt, calls secured credit cards "a Clint Eastwood movie -- the good, the bad and the ugly. Some are good. They have low fees and treat customers as customers instead of as cattle. The bad ones take advantage and extort the clients because of their situations. Then there's the ugly, which are completely despicable. They'll give you the card, but you have to buy this insurance policy for $55 a month."

The Federal Trade Commission organized a crackdown on telemarketers illegally charging fees that range from $25 to several hundred dollars in advance of receiving "guaranteed" credit cards or loans. Consumers either got nothing or were just sent credit card applications.

Gather plenty of information when you apply for a card. In addition to such important items as the interest rates, fees and the required deposit, you'll want to get answers to these questions:

7. Do you report to all three major credit bureaus?
The reason for having a secured card goes far beyond being able to buy CDs online. It's a vehicle for building a good credit history. If the issuer doesn't report, you've lost a major benefit. (Tip: If you start getting mailers offering you unsecured cards after you've made several months of payments on time, you'll know that the bank is reporting.) Ask if the issuer will flag the report to the credit bureaus as a secured card. Consumer Action points out that such a flag could be a deterrent to rebuilding credit.

8. How long does it take to qualify for an unsecured card?
The card issuer should want to keep you as a customer, so most will qualify you for an unsecured card after a period of making all your payments on time. The average is about a year.

9. How much interest will my deposit earn, and what kind of account does the deposit have to be in?
Generally, you'll be getting about what you'd get if you opened a savings account at your own bank. The deposit options include a savings account, money market or certificate of deposit. Also, ask how long the money has to stay on deposit after the account is closed. Some banks will want to keep the deposit for a couple of billing cycles to cover any stray charges that arrive.

10. How can I make the best use of a secured card to build my credit rating?
Buy a few things and pay off the card every month. "People should not get these cards to carry any balance," Sherry says. "It seems you need to make a few purchases and pay for them. It helps to pay in full every month to show you've got this excellent credit rating."

While secured cards make sure you never spend more money than you can afford while they force you to save, it's not a good idea to keep one any longer than you have to, experts say.

All secured cards have annual fees and higher interest rates than regular, unsecured cards. If you have enough discipline to use a secured card responsibly, you have enough to use an unsecured card and set up a better savings program on your own.

"We recommend to people that it should be a stepping stone," Sherry says.
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839
10
Joined Feb 22, 2008
Go to a credit union talk to a loan officer tell them you want to 'establish/build your credit' ask them the rate, if there is annual fees, any otherquestions you have.

They will probably suggest a secured credit card: for example you leave $500 in your savings which they secure/hold until you build a relationship with them aslong as you pay off your credit card monthly your beacon/credit score will raise. After six months (depends on financial institutions policies) you can ask foryour card to become unsecured which means they will take the hold off your initial $500 and it will be available to you.

If you pay your card off every month you wont lose money, if you leave a balance on your credit card interest accrues on that balance, your payment goestowards interest first then principal so if you pay it off they (the Credit Union) will never make interest off you

Department store credit cards are a good way to build credit just make sure you pay them off every pay period

Auto Loan (might need a co-signer) pay it off

Never be 30 or more days late. Late payments are reported by days late 30, 60, and 90 days late will ruin you
 
2,702
12
Joined May 3, 2007
store credit cards, like Macys, help establish credit history which is a big component of your score. sign up for a couple small ones and keep them locked in adrawer if you want.

keep close track of everything you do and use your free credit reports annually or more often.
 
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