Nike Zoom Vaporfly Elite 2017

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weather conditions and roads would have to play a big factor in that

I haven’t yet but once I do, I’m going to see what course EK ran on. If it was anything like the initial Breaking2 event, there was little to no road incline

pretty flat course from what I recall.
It’s a world “record.” But do they officially count the effort since the weather, road and pacers were included in the scenario (+the shoes)?
 

stann

formerly stanleynhan
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I can lol.

I ran a half last year slow. His record was quicker and double the distance. That is one fast, determined and durable man.
yeah anyone that's run a half or full would totally see how crazy and amazing it was for him to finally break 2, but i think that for any average person who doesn't really think much about marathon running like us would realize how big of an accomplishment this is
 
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Mo Farah running Chicago Marathon in Pink Blast Next% Flyknit
 
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Kenyan Brigid Kosgei Smashes Women's World Record At Chicago Marathon

Kenya's Brigid Kosgei won the Chicago Marathon on Sunday with a time of 2 hours 14 minutes 4 seconds, breaking the previous world record by 81 seconds.

At 25, the Kenyan defended her title after winning last year's event, and put almost 7 minutes between herself and her competition. Both from Ethopia, Ababel Yeshaneh finished second with a time of 2:20:51 and Gelete Burka came in third at 2:20:55.

The previous world record time of 2:15:25 was set by Britain's Paula Radcliffe in 2003 at the London Marathon.


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Kenyan Brigid Kosgei Smashes Women's World Record At Chicago Marathon

Kenya's Brigid Kosgei won the Chicago Marathon on Sunday with a time of 2 hours 14 minutes 4 seconds, breaking the previous world record by 81 seconds.

At 25, the Kenyan defended her title after winning last year's event, and put almost 7 minutes between herself and her competition. Both from Ethopia, Ababel Yeshaneh finished second with a time of 2:20:51 and Gelete Burka came in third at 2:20:55.

The previous world record time of 2:15:25 was set by Britain's Paula Radcliffe in 2003 at the London Marathon.


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I haven't checked myself, but someone in the advancedrunning forum on reddit said that Kosgei's coach also coached Rita Jeptoo. It's a sad state of affairs when what should be a celebration of crushing a world record is, for me, sitting with an asterisk until her drug tests come back clean.
 
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I wanted to ask that. How rampant is drug use? Figure EPO, steroids, etc would help in this type of activity.

Guess my only question would be why an impoverished continent like Africa is able to dominate when China, Russia, US, etc have access to better drugs, doctors, technology, etc.
 
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I wanted to ask that. How rampant is drug use? Figure EPO, steroids, etc would help in this type of activity.

Guess my only question would be why an impoverished continent like Africa is able to dominate when China, Russia, US, etc have access to better drugs, doctors, technology, etc.
Well, Russia has been banned recently - athletes from Russia that pass IAAF and IOC tests compete under their own "flag" in international competitions. Not with running/T&F, but China has been the subject of rumor in other sports, most notably gymnastics. In the U.S., just last week was the Nike ORPJT / Salazar decision. There have been allegations with certain groups in Kenya and the testing issues in those regions. Again, none of it is proven to date, but there is a bit of a cloud over some of the athletes/coaches coming from those areas.

Again, it is all speculation and nothing but speculation.
 
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i believe we have discussed this issue before:

IAAF to Investigate Nike's ZoomX Vaporfly Following Multiple Broken Records

According to The Times, since the Vaporfly’s initial launch back in 2016, “Dennis Kimetto’s 2014 world record of 2:2:57 has been bettered on five occasions, each time by an athlete wearing the shoe.” In addition, Eliud Kipchoge wore a special prototype of the Vaporfly when he became the first person to run a sub-two-hour marathon, and so did Brigid Kosgei when she broke the women’s world record the next day. “Normally I don’t like to fall for marketing stuff,” performance coach for professional runners Steve Magness told The Washington Post, “but if you look at the research and data, the shoes seem to have a big effect.”

As a result, many professional athletes have reportedly complained to the IAAF (International Association of Athletics Federations) and the Athletics Integrity Unit in hopes that the organizations will examine the shoes to determine if they are providing runners with an unfair advantage. The IAAF recently issued a statement to The Times acknowledging the issue. “Recent advances in technology mean that the concept of ‘assistance’ to athletes… has been the subject of much debate in the athletics world,” said the statement. “The IAAF has established a working group to consider the issues.”
 
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i believe we have discussed this issue before:

IAAF to Investigate Nike's ZoomX Vaporfly Following Multiple Broken Records
I thought Brigid was just wearing a normal pair of the pink next %. She definitely seem confused by their shoe questions in the press conference after.
 

stann

formerly stanleynhan
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i believe we have discussed this issue before:

IAAF to Investigate Nike's ZoomX Vaporfly Following Multiple Broken Records

According to The Times, since the Vaporfly’s initial launch back in 2016, “Dennis Kimetto’s 2014 world record of 2:2:57 has been bettered on five occasions, each time by an athlete wearing the shoe.” In addition, Eliud Kipchoge wore a special prototype of the Vaporfly when he became the first person to run a sub-two-hour marathon, and so did Brigid Kosgei when she broke the women’s world record the next day. “Normally I don’t like to fall for marketing stuff,” performance coach for professional runners Steve Magness told The Washington Post, “but if you look at the research and data, the shoes seem to have a big effect.”

As a result, many professional athletes have reportedly complained to the IAAF (International Association of Athletics Federations) and the Athletics Integrity Unit in hopes that the organizations will examine the shoes to determine if they are providing runners with an unfair advantage. The IAAF recently issued a statement to The Times acknowledging the issue. “Recent advances in technology mean that the concept of ‘assistance’ to athletes… has been the subject of much debate in the athletics world,” said the statement. “The IAAF has established a working group to consider the issues.”
would assume that it’s non Nike athletes that would be bringing up these complaints but If I’m not mistaken, aren’t other companies starting to add a carbon fiber plate to their shoes as well? the plate seems to be the thing that is causing all this controversy from the articles I’ve been reading

regardless of shoes and the tech in it, I still believe that it takes a lot of training and talent just to be able to run sub 2 and we should all just be happy to see this barrier be broken
 
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i do think it helps propel you forward but it seems like "nike just figured out to use it first so now everyone else is implementing it" type of idea but a similar tech would be/has been(?) banned in the nba for example
 
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i do think it helps propel you forward but it seems like "nike just figured out to use it first so now everyone else is implementing it" type of idea but a similar tech would be/has been(?) banned in the nba for example
Research suggests that the carbon fiber plate doesn't actually act like a spring and it isn't the main driver of performance gains:

An expert in the energetics of running, Hoogkamer was the first author on the peer-reviewed study Nike relied on to claim the OG Vaporfly could improve running economy by 4 percent. What that study couldn't tell him and his colleagues was where the energy savings came from. So they designed a follow-up study to begin teasing apart where those precious percentage points originate.

Their results showed that the foam in the midsole (Nike calls it ZoomX, but foam nerds know it as Pebax) is uncommonly compliant and resilient. Translation: It's squishy and springy, respectively. Those properties enable the foam to absorb the energy a runner applies when their feet meet pavement and return a portion of it to their stride … somehow. How it works, exactly, remains unclear. The researchers originally hypothesized that the foam would save runners energy by reducing bending at their knees, but that turned out not to be the case. "But the foam, mechanically speaking, is a big player in whatever's going on," Hoogkamer says.

Their results also showed that the carbon fiber plate plays a role—but not in the way many people think. When the Vaporfly was first unveiled, critics of the shoe speculated that the plate acted like a spring. But Hoogkamer's findings suggest the plate's spring function is negligible. What the plate does do is improves runners' ankle mechanics by stabilizing the joint and reducing the load on the calves. At the same time, its stiffness helps keep runners' toes nice and straight, allowing them to preserve the energy they would otherwise spend flexing them.

If keeping your toes straight sounds to you like it would provide pretty meager energy benefits, Hoogkamer agrees. "Physiologically speaking, I have a hard time believing that eliminating toe flexion saves you much," he says. "My current thinking is that the foam and plate are working in concert, but that the foam is doing more work than the plate."


 
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I thought Brigid was just wearing a normal pair of the pink next %. She definitely seem confused by their shoe questions in the press conference after.
If she was confused, it's probably because she doesn't speak much, if any, English. She's also probably a little nervous about the results of the drug test (see earlier posts). Her finish line body language looked awfully guilty to me. Again, I hope she's clean.
 
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If she was confused, it's probably because she doesn't speak much, if any, English. She's also probably a little nervous about the results of the drug test (see earlier posts). Her finish line body language looked awfully guilty to me. Again, I hope she's clean.
What about her body language looked guilty? If anything she looked lonely because she didn't have a huge entourage to greet her upon completion.
 
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If she was confused, it's probably because she doesn't speak much, if any, English. She's also probably a little nervous about the results of the drug test (see earlier posts). Her finish line body language looked awfully guilty to me. Again, I hope she's clean.
I meant the reporters kept pressing more even though it was obvious she was struggling to understand. Needed a translator up there with her. I’ll reserve judgement until the test results come out.
 
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