Official NBA Live 14 Thread - Official Cover Released , Brief In-Game Footage. Xbox One & PS4

Are you looking Forward to NBA Live 14 ?

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[h2]EA’s E3 event gives us real basketball physics and nearly real-time stat updates for every player.[/h2][h2] [/h2]
June 10th, 2013Michael Langley
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If you love basketball games, EA Sports thinks you are going to love the BounceTek technology in the new NBA Live 14.

EA brought Kyrie Irving on stage at E3 Monday to show off technology that, for the first time, doesn't make the ball go automatically back to your hand when you dribble. BounceTek allegedly adds real-time physics to your handle to give you the ability to add creativity to your ankle-breaking. (Meanwhile, I would be dribbling off my foot just like I do in real life.)

And NBA Live 14 players will have to stay on their toes — the game's going to change practically every day. For the first time, more than 70 unique stats and player tendencies will be updated within an hour of the final buzzer in every NBA game, affecting how their cyber counterparts dish the rock, shoot the J or D-up. EA is promising a new experience every time you pick up the controller.

EA is releasing NBA Live 14 for the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 later this year.
Can't talk about 5 on 5 AI for NBA Live 14. The only thing they showed was the dribble mechanics. It was impressive, easy to use.

— Steve Noah (@Steve_OS) June 11, 2013
Signature shots and signature dribbles are in NBA Live 14. Kyrie Irving hesitations, signature dribble style looked perfect. Eye opening.

— Steve Noah (@Steve_OS) June 11, 2013
Encouraged by NBA Live 14. There is a distinctly different vibe towards it than what I felt surrounded the last two attempts.

— Bryan Wiedey (@pastapadre) June 11, 2013
@pastapadre Hows the Net Physics?

— NBA LIVE 14 (@nbalivefreak) June 11, 2013
@nbalivefreak Hard to evaluate. Certainly better than the past but I only really saw swishes.
— Bryan Wiedey (@pastapadre) June 11, 2013
Looking forward to see what EA has been able to accomplish with it's 4 year hiatus from the NBA Live series. We all know how terrible "Elite" it was easily the worst sports game ever developed but for whatever reason I have faith in EA to make a decent and enjoyable basketball sim for the next gen consoles. Live is not in competition with 2K at all and won't be for another 2-3 years on IF Live 14 is actually good and we all have to realize that. I look at Live as an alternative to the NBA 2K series but I won't lie and act like I haven't wanted to play a different basketball sim for the past couple years. Good feedback is starting to come out from media who have seen the game in action which is very good to hear so i'm looking forward to seeing how the game progresses within the coming months prior to release.
 

Bert.

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i dont think next gen will save this franchise. its gonna be hard to get people to switch to live unless 2k really messes everything up which i dont see happening but then again i didnt like 2k13 but i doubt i would have stuck out with Live 13 if it had dropped
 
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That trailer doesn't look as good as the 2k trailer. The guy had a lot of fancy tech talk, but the proof is in the pudding. I cant see Live outperforming 2k honestly.
 
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Players' body type in the trailer are all the same. :lol:

Hope they can fix that. Kinda sucks they couldn't pull themselves to continue the franchise since NBA Live 10 was good imo.
 
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Game Play wise it looks promising graphics wise its STRAIGHT BUNS
2k14 right now is untouchable make the graphics rival 2k and you're in business.
 
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E3 2013: NBA Live 14 Hands-On (Xbox One)

Submitted on: 06/12/2013 by Steve Noah



If you remembered last year, NBA Live 13 was the game I was most excited about seeing at E3 2012. Well, we all know how well that worked out for basketball gamers, as the title was cancelled before it ever came to market.

This year things are looking up, and the reason for that is called BounceTek. BounceTek is the new physics-based dribbling system implemented into the game, which was showcased in some hands-on action with Kyrie Irving. This dribbling system seems to be borrowed from the old (defunct) NBA Elite which never made it to market either. Elite promised a new way of basketball starting with the dribbling system, one must think a lot of that old philosophy still stands with Live 14.

While it was unfortunate that we didn't see any 5-on-5 action, at least they showed something worthwhile.

In previous NBA Live iterations the ball position was hard coded in every animation, so when you changed direction the ball sort of glided and floated along with you. Nobody wants the ball to magically float from one hand to the other. In fact, they have added over 1,000 animations to get the basic movements of the player correct, and even more when you add signature dribble animations. Yes, signature dribbles. They will also have signature shots.

There are quite a few layers to the dribbling system, below are just some of the examples:

Flick up - In and out
Flick down - Behind the back
Flick right - Hesitation
Flick left - Crossover
135 degrees (lower left) - Between the legs

You can also chain the dribble moves together. For example, to perform a hesitation crossover you would simply flick the right stick to the right, then to the left. By holding down on the L1 button and flicking the right stick in different directions, you will get a signature dribbling animation. I easily performed the UTEP two-step with Irving by holding the L1 button and flicking the right stick to the right. Remember the crossover he put on Brandon Knight during All-Star Weekend? He actually did that move 25 times before it happened, which was tracked by Synergy. You can perform it by holding the L1 button and flicking the right stick to the lower left.



The cool thing about Synergy is that if a player starts using a certain signature dribble in real life, it can easily be implemented into the game. If Damian Lillard starts using a new dribble in the middle of the season and Synergy picks up on it, you can bet it will be added. They won't just throw in animations either. If it tracks well on Synergy, you can be sure to see it added in the players dribbling arsenal. However, don't expect to use your BounceTek dribbling skills without a penalty. Your stamina will take a hit when using them, so make sure to use it wisely as you won't always be successful when you are low on energy.

While playing around, I noticed the gathers were not always smooth, but the EA folks in the booth were aware of it. The net has physics. I saw quite a few realistic ones, but others looked odd, almost as if it should have been an all net swish and the ball sort of hung in the net a little longer than it should have.

They showed Irving's face in the background, talking. It looked almost exactly like him.

I saw virtually no sliding. The only time I really saw it was when I went up for a dunk or layup. It didn't happen every time, but I did see it. I didn't see any sliding when performing the various dribble moves. NONE.

We were told Steve Nash has a pocket hesitation, he's slower and reacts differently, Derrick Rose has his herky-jerky animations, Brandon Jennings has his bouncy style, Melo has a stutter step and when the Knicks play in Boston, the crowd chants Honey Nut Cheerios. (I'm joking).

Defender reactions will be different as well. Facing off with Steve Blake will be a lot easier than facing Rajon Rondo, for example. If Irving gets a pick-and-roll switch, it's curtains for that defender.

A few more notes on Synergy: Don't get used to the way a player is guarding you. They can and will change their tactics on various possessions. Player accessories will change on a game-by-game basis, so there is no need to worry about that. I can't get into the specifics, but it should make a lot of people happy.

I was told that Synergy will update on an hourly basis during the season, so everything from accessories to ratings will change as the players in the real league change.

There were a few things that I can't talk about right now that were mentioned to me. If it isn't all talk, we could be in for a treat this year as basketball fans.

For now, we have to wait with the rest of you to see how NBA Live 14 comes along. There are still some cruicial tests to be passed, such as seeing some 5-on-5 action and what else the game is bringing to the table.
 
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[h1]E3 2013 Preview: NBA Live 14 has some mad stick skills[/h1][h1] [/h1]

Posted by: Lance Liebl



I've been waiting to play another NBA Live game for quite some time now. So I was quite enthusiastic when I entered EA Sports' booth at this year's E3.

NBA Live 14 is coming to next-gen consoles -- the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One -- touting the EA's new Ignite engine; it takes physics in sports games to a whole new level. The focus on EA's NBA Live 14 area was on the number one thing they've been pushing: dribbling.

NBA Live 14 developer Sea O'Brien said that "dribbling hasn't been done right" in basketball games yet. And he's right. Usually, you pull off a dribble move and get stuck in the animation. Good players -- especially online -- will see your animation, know how many moves there will be in it, and then know when to make their move. They read it perfectly.

NBA Live 14 sets out to fix that. And I must say, the dribbling and ball handling is everything they say it is.

With the Ignite engine, there are over 1,000 new animation, which makes ball handling look and feel authentic. Gone is ball warping, where the ball floats across the floor because of the lack of animations. Each of the ball, hands and feet have their own physics and animations, and the ball actually leaves the ball handler's hands. What's great is that the player now has total control of the ball. The basketball will not switch hands unless directed to by the player.

Developers are going to say everything and anything to hype you up for their game. So when I got my hands on the PlayStation 4 controller they had set up for me to use at their station, I was eager to see how NBA Live 14 would perform. I'm happy to say that it's smooth, intuitive and full of possibilities. Those skilled with the analog sticks will absolutely love the new dribbling system in the NBA Live 14.

There are six inputs for dribbling, each assigned to a different "flick" of the right analog stick. Each flick is a different move, and there's absolutely no stutter or lag from the flick input to the execution. After those six dribbling inputs, if you hold down 'L' and perform flicks with the right analog stick, you get signature dribble moves of NBA stars.

Available to us was gameplay with Kyrie Irving to show off the new ball handling. Kyrie had his own six unique dribble moves, but right now there are over 40 signature sets of dribble moves in pre-alpha -- from the likes of Steve Nash, Carmelo Anthony and Brandon Jennings, among others. Each of them have six unique dribble moves assigned to the flicks, with different speeds, and defenders react differently to each one from each star.

And if your sick with the stick, dedication to mastering the new system will yield some nice results. You can combo up all of the dribble moves with the right analog stick. Stuff like going from a crossover to a spin, all done real-time without a queue up of dribble moves. To me, though, the biggest deal is being able to switch the hand that the ball is in, simply by flicking left or right on the analog stick. Doing so again will give you a nice little hesitation move. And since you're not stuck in pre-set animations anymore, you can shoot the ball at anytime, keeping the defender off guard.

All of this creates a nice little back and forth between the ball handler and the defender, who has also received AI upgrades. But there will be more information on that later.

I walked away from NBA Live 14 very impressed with the little time I had with the game. EA Sports' Ignite engine is the real deal, and dribbling is everything it has been hyped to be. If the dribbling is any indication of how good the five-on-five will be, then NBA Live 14 will change the standard of basketball games for a new console generation.

NBA Live 14 will release on Xbox One and PlayStation 4. There is no release date at this time.

You can follow Senior Editor Lance Liebl on Twitter @Lance_GZ. He likes talking sports, video games, movies, and the stupidity of celebrities. Email at LLiebl@GameZone.com
game is shaping up beatifully
 
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E3 '13: Hands-on with "NBA Live 14" and "Bouncetek"

By Douglas Veney  on June 17, 2013
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For the past few years, most of the jokes in the sports-gaming universe have seemed to center around the NBA Live series. Those jabs have been fair, to say the least, as the series saw a massive change of direction of the high-performing NBA Live 09  & NBA Live 10 that lead to multiple titles being cancelled.

While there were quite a few sports titles showcased at E3 this year, NBA Live 14  was one of the highest on my radar. Kyrie Irving’s character model, showcased during the EA press briefing, seemed to be too far from in-game graphics, so getting my hands on a playable build of the game was sure to help me gauge the current status of the game.

The focus of the press briefing, BounceTek, was also the focus of what we saw behind closed doors. The playable build we had our hands on featured Kyrie Irving in a gym by himself. Visually, the game looks fantastic. There was an incredible amount of detail in Irving’s model–especially in his face–and the build of the player was a large improvement over typical NBA Live models. Similarly, the dribbling animations were incredibly fluid; using the L1 button on the Playstation 4 controller allowed us to tap into Irving’s six signature moves.

BounceTek is all about bringing a physics-based dribbling system to the virtual hardwood, something we’ve never seen before. You’re able to let a move play all the way out, or break out of it and chain together your own moves. Rather than letting your opponent see the initiation of a move and know where you’re going, you’re potentially able to see how they’re playing you and use that to your advantage.

We were told that the game currently has 40 players with signature dribbling moves, and the team is hoping to add more as they near  launch. BounceTek should really help separate the average from the elite players, but we should also see differential between players like Rose, Westbrook, and Parker.

The dribbling mechanic works great solo, but the true test will be once we see a defender thrown into the mix, and eventually five-on-five. The purpose of dribbling is to set up plays for your teammates, evade pressure, or to create a shot. While we were able to see the basic functionality and fluidity of the feature, we’re itching to see how it works when defenders are thrown into the mix.

To add some hope for the defensive and team aspects of the game, EA SPORTS also announced CourtQ. Seeming rather similar to the “Synergy” technology we saw in previous NBA Live titles, the system will allow players and teams to perform almost identical to their real-life counterparts. From moves to offensive sets, CourtQ looks to be the answer to finally having realistic AI in a basketball game.

The Ignite engine and BounceTek have set up NBA Live 14  to succeed, but we’re cautiously optimistic at this point. What we played felt great, but until we see the game running five-on-five, we can’t help but wonder how it’ll all work together.

 
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[h1]Hands-on with 'NBA Live 14'[/h1]
Brett Molina, USA TODAY3:13 p.m. EDT June 17, 2013



(Photo: Electronic Arts)

For fans of Electronic Arts basketball series NBA Live, the past couple years have been torturous.

First, there was NBA Elite 11, an attempted rebranding of the franchise shelved at the last minute thanks to a demo that featured such classic bugs as "Jesus Bynum."

The publisher tried again, this time with NBA Live 13, only to cancel once again due to quality issues.

So, I approached the demo station for NBA Live 14  with some anticipation and extreme caution. On display at the Electronic Entertainment Expo was a tiny slice ofNBA Live 14, slated to launch for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One this fall.

The key feature for the game, promoted by Cleveland Cavaliers star Kyrie Irving, is BounceTek, which adds dynamic dribbling. BounceTek essentially treats the ball as a separate entity from the player, which would result in a more accurate portrayal of ballhandling.

A demo at E3 featured Irving, alone on the court with ball in hand, to demonstrate how dribbling works. Players perform quick flicks of the right thumbstick to switch hands, crossover, dribble behind the back and other moves. Pressing the left bumper opens up signature moves with a bit more flair. The goal is to string together these moves in a way to stay a step ahead of the defender.

The dribbling and shooting in NBA Live  feels solid. It's easy to perform the basics, but requires some skill and timing to nail down the more complex combinations. It still needs a little polish in terms of fluidity between picking up the ball and taking the shot, something rival NBA 2K  has mastered over several seasons.

Where NBA Live  has an advantage is in visuals. Kyrie Irving's digital likeness looks highly realistic. While 2K  has made strides in this area, the E3 demo at EA's booth reminded me how far ahead they seem to be in modeling each player virtual persona. Then again, graphics aren't why NBA 2K  dominates.

There's still a lot to learn about NBA Live. How will this game feel 5-on-5? How will teammates not control by the player operate? How will game feature CourtQ, which accurately breaks down players based on statistics and tendencies, work in the game?

At this point, NBA Live  fans would be happy just seeing a fresh game to play. And does EA really have much to lose? NBA 2K  is clearly the frontrunner in this space. They've recruited big names, including Michael Jordan and LeBron James, the cover star for NBA 2K14NBA Live  comes in as the underdog.

So far, NBA Live 14  is intriguing. Let's just hope video game players get to enjoy a final version this time.

Follow Brett Molina on Twitter: @bam923.
 
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[h2]NBA Live 14 vs. NBA 2K14: NBA Live Reportedly Has the Upper Hand in Graphics[/h2]
By Robert Christie  r.christie@hngn.com  | Jun 17, 2013 05:54 PM EDT

Until the games actually hit stores in fall many will compare "NBA Live 14" and "NBA 2K14", with “NBA 2K14” being the favorite. However, according to USA Today’s Brett Molina, there is one area in which “NBA Live 14” has the upper hand. (Photo : NBA Live 14/ Facebook)

As the release of the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 approach, NBA fans are wondering which game to buy. Do I stick with the time-tested and trusted powerhouse in “NBA 2K14” or do I try the franchise that is attempting to make a comeback from in “NBA Live 14.”

Until the games actually hit stores in fall many will compare them, with “NBA 2K14” being the favorite. However, according to USA Today’s Brett Molina, there is one area in which “NBA Live 14” has the upper hand.“Where NBA Live  has an advantage is in visuals,” says Molina in his review of the game after trying it out at the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3).

According to Molina, Cleveland Cavaliers star young point guard and “NBA 14” cover athlete Kyrie Irving, looks “highly realistic” in the game. “NBA 2K14” has gotten better in its graphics in the past few installments but still can still make some improvements. However, Molina also points out “NBA 2K14” graphics have not really been that much of a hindrance to the game’s success.

EA Sports is showing a bit of potential with “NBA Live 14.” They are using the new Ignite engine in all of their upcoming sports games and have used it to create “BounceTek” in "NBA Live 14."*

The jist of Ignite is to allow players to react in real time. According to “NBA Live 14” Executive Producer Scott O’Brien, BouceTek  allows dribbling to become authentic since the ball actually leaves the dribblers hand every time he drops it. Before, said O’Brien during the game’s E3 presentation, “your hand was literally tied to the ball. Ball handling was completely unnatural and absolutely predictable. With BounceTek, we separate the ball from the hand in every single dribbling animation. This gives the player impressive control and authentic responsiveness.”

The game also features Court Q, which, according to EASports.com, updates players tendencies on the court based on data downloaded after every NBA game is finished. It will be interesting to see how accurate this feature is.

Gamers are still waiting for the release of “NBA 2K14” features. It could be that 2K Sports doesn’t have that many new features because they believed EA Sports would fail with “NBA Live” as they’ve done the past few years. On the other hand they could be just waiting for “NBA Live 14” to gain some momentum before they shut them down with a whole host of new tricks. (Let’s hope it’s the latter.)

“NBA Live 14” will release exclusively for the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 this fall.

“NBA 2K14” will release for the next-gen consoles, in addition to Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 and PC on October 1.

*This previously said "2K14" however BounceTek is only available on "NBA Live 14"
 
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Ive always been an nba live guy, I'm hoping for the best
I used to be a Live fan too back in the day, but then I realized that being a live fan is like settling for a Civic when you can get a Lambo for the same price. Hop on that 2K gang yo
 
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I love 2k since 2k-2k2 but always been a live guy since 95, but I wouldn't mind switching over and seeing how good the dynamics are if they have a my player like 2k then I'm gunna give it a shot
 
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2k been damn near the same since 2k11. i'd love to have a playable version of live, if for no other reason than to get the 2k devs off their *****
 
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[h1]Hands-on with 'NBA Live 14'[/h1]


Brett Molina, USA TODAY
3:13 p.m. EDT June 17, 2013









(Photo: Electronic Arts)



For fans of Electronic Arts basketball series NBA Live, the past couple years have been torturous.



First, there was NBA Elite 11, an attempted rebranding of the franchise shelved at the last minute thanks to a demo that featured such classic bugs as "Jesus Bynum."



The publisher tried again, this time with NBA Live 13, only to cancel once again due to quality issues.



So, I approached the demo station for NBA Live 14 with some anticipation and extreme caution. On display at the Electronic Entertainment Expo was a tiny slice ofNBA Live 14, slated to launch for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One this fall.



The key feature for the game, promoted by Cleveland Cavaliers star Kyrie Irving, is BounceTek, which adds dynamic dribbling. BounceTek essentially treats the ball as a separate entity from the player, which would result in a more accurate portrayal of ballhandling.



A demo at E3 featured Irving, alone on the court with ball in hand, to demonstrate how dribbling works. Players perform quick flicks of the right thumbstick to switch hands, crossover, dribble behind the back and other moves. Pressing the left bumper opens up signature moves with a bit more flair. The goal is to string together these moves in a way to stay a step ahead of the defender.



The dribbling and shooting in NBA Live feels solid. It's easy to perform the basics, but requires some skill and timing to nail down the more complex combinations. It still needs a little polish in terms of fluidity between picking up the ball and taking the shot, something rival NBA 2K has mastered over several seasons.



Where NBA Live has an advantage is in visuals. Kyrie Irving's digital likeness looks highly realistic. While 2K has made strides in this area, the E3 demo at EA's booth reminded me how far ahead they seem to be in modeling each player virtual persona. Then again, graphics aren't why NBA 2K dominates.



There's still a lot to learn about NBA Live. How will this game feel 5-on-5? How will teammates not control by the player operate? How will game feature CourtQ, which accurately breaks down players based on statistics and tendencies, work in the game?



At this point, NBA Live fans would be happy just seeing a fresh game to play. And does EA really have much to lose? NBA 2K is clearly the frontrunner in this space. They've recruited big names, including Michael Jordan and LeBron James, the cover star for NBA 2K14NBA Live comes in as the underdog.



So far, NBA Live 14 is intriguing. Let's just hope video game players get to enjoy a final version this time.



Follow Brett Molina on Twitter: @bam923.

that picture has to be a joke. no way on earth they're going to unleash a game that looks like that. players look terrible and stiff as hell. deandre jordan is looking like black eiffel tower
 
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