Can someone tell me the cons of marijuana usage?

7,138
1,149
Joined Aug 23, 2003
or better yet give me a link to a documentary arguing against the legalization of marijuana? 
every single doc. that i've searched is always supporting marijuana and talks about the benefits. 

Are there even any significant negative aspects to using it?

im trying to educate myself  
 
18,905
1,183
Joined Dec 28, 2004
well its illegal and could go against you when getting/keeping a job.(drug testin)

the only reason (well one of) the only reasons i dont smoke.
 
5,262
11
Joined Sep 22, 2009
Marijuana itself doesn't have many harmful effects, but I know a lot of people who fell the $!%! off, and it started with Marijuana.

And Dirty doesn't condone its use.
 
7,138
1,149
Joined Aug 23, 2003
^^ good looks on those "facts" 

I would say most 99% of those are completely false. 

I've realized they are very biased and without any real scientific backing. Something that govt agencies would make up to justify the prohibition policy. 

 Marijuana has been linked with teen violence, suicide, crime, and unsafe sex-HIV transmission.

 cmon now. 

Marijuana can be a gateway drug, which means it can lead to the use of many other harmful drugs--Children ages 12-17 are 85 times more likely to use cocaine

people still believe this? 

Marijuana may produce a mild physical dependence that causes minor withdrawal symptoms when discontinued, including nausea, insomnia, irritability, and anxiety.

only one that might be somewhat true. 
 
4,052
1,032
Joined May 16, 2004
Originally Posted by TeamJordan79


Marijuana may produce a mild physical dependence that causes minor withdrawal symptoms when discontinued, including nausea, insomnia, irritability, and anxiety.
only one that might be somewhat true. 

i've actually seen this.  couple of my boys would smoke everyday and one of em tried to take a some time off and went through crazy withdrawals.  i mean he was all jittery and throwing up all the time 
  but this isn't just with weed.  anyone who has anything frequently enough will hit withdrawals when they try to stop
 
5,217
118
Joined May 18, 2009
I can only speak for myself but I think that having smoked weed, my short-term memory has gotten a bit worse. I'm finding it harder to remember everything. This may be due to the fact that I just have a lot more on my plate now than before but still. I can't help but feel that it's somehow a contributing factor.
 
7,138
1,149
Joined Aug 23, 2003
Originally Posted by superflyinchopstickninja

Originally Posted by TeamJordan79


Marijuana may produce a mild physical dependence that causes minor withdrawal symptoms when discontinued, including nausea, insomnia, irritability, and anxiety.
only one that might be somewhat true. 
i've actually seen this.  couple of my boys would smoke everyday and one of em tried to take a some time off and went through crazy withdrawals.  i mean he was all jittery and throwing up all the time 
  but this isn't just with weed.  anyone who has anything frequently enough will hit withdrawals when they try to stop


yea i mean i get that with coffee. Won't even get into cigarettes.  
 

aizensousuke

Banned
286
10
Joined Feb 22, 2010
Originally Posted by CWrite78

less money in my pocket
this is exactly what i came in here to type
i understand its all good if its not something you do often

but in my case... i blow a nice amount of $ on it a year that could've gone to a better use, but i say ehh @*$+ it
 
7,624
1,012
Joined Jan 2, 2010
$$$
short term memory loss
ummm that withdrawl *##% is definitely true... if u smoke daily and quit u wont even want to eat really... u just wont get the urge that tells u ur hungry...
 
3,807
11
Joined Aug 2, 2006
The idea of marijuana being a gateway drug for teens/people is true, but not as you may think. It is typically the first drug people who do other drugs try, but they were probably going to do these other drugs either way--it just happens that this is where they started.

Memory loss is the most noticeable side effect. If you have a particularly large vocabulary, expect it to take a hit. You'll be doing things and hit a "what's the word for..." type moment.

Oh, and in most states, the criminal punishment kind of sucks.
 
52
10
Joined Nov 16, 2005
I used to smoke daily for about 2 years easily now...and thats heavily. I recently quit about a month ago and for a while I couldnt sleep or eat as much as I would have liked to due to not smoking anymore. I started going to the gym at night and me being tired helped me go to sleep. No other form of withdrawal for me. And plus it only lasted like a week or so till I got used to not smoking anymore.
 
7,138
1,149
Joined Aug 23, 2003
Originally Posted by LAshoehead87

I used to smoke daily for about 2 years easily now...and thats heavily. I recently quit about a month ago and for a while I couldnt sleep or eat as much as I would have liked to due to not smoking anymore. I started going to the gym at night and me being tired helped me go to sleep. No other form of withdrawal for me. And plus it only lasted like a week or so till I got used to not smoking anymore.
Ok but my question is: Do you think if u smoked organically grown "clean" marijuana u would experience these side effects? Maybe what u were consuming from time to time was laced with something else? This is what i think scientific research should focus on. 
Plus lets not forget that the negative effects of actual smoking or burning the plant at high temperatures, which can release harmful carcinogens, can be negated by vaporizing. 
 
2,779
10
Joined Jul 31, 2006
Originally Posted by AizenSousuke

Originally Posted by CWrite78

less money in my pocket
this is exactly what i came in here to type
i understand its all good if its not something you do often

but in my case... i blow a nice amount of $ on it a year that could've gone to a better use, but i say ehh @*$+ it
This and inhaling smoke into your lungs CANNOT be good for you or even have no effect, so something is definitely going on in there. Even if it's just weaker lung capacity. With the money thing though, I barely go out/drink so I guess it's just a substitute ? I dunno, I DON'T NEED TO EXPLAIN MYSELF TO YOU!
 

kdawg

Staff member
7,948
6,909
Joined Jun 25, 2003
Early Marijuana Use Heightens Psychosis Risk in Young Adults

Allison Gandey

March 4, 2010 (Updated with comment March 10, 2010) — Experimenting with marijuana at a young age increases the risk for hallucinations or delusions later in life, a new study shows.

"Early cannabis use increases the risk of psychosis in young adults," lead investigator John McGrath, MD, from the Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research in Brisbane, Australia, told Medscape Psychiatry.

"Apart from having an increased risk of having a disorder like schizophrenia, the longer the young adults reported since their first cannabis use, the more likely they were to report isolated symptoms of psychosis."

Cannabis is a risk factor for psychosis, and we need to let the general community know about these risks.

Psychotic disorders are common and typically affect 1 or 2 people of every 100. "Despite our best efforts with treatment, not everyone makes a full recovery," Dr. McGrath said. "We need to think about prevention. Cannabis is a risk factor for psychosis, and we need to let the general community know about these risks."

Dr. McGrath says he was surprised that the results were so strong and so consistent.

The study was published online March 1 in Archives of General Psychiatry.

Investigators studied 3800 young adults born at an Australian hospital taking part in the Mater-University Study of Pregnancy.

Prospective studies have already identified an association between marijuana use and later psychosis-related outcomes, but concerns remain about unmeasured confounding variables.

Dr. McGrath and his team focused instead on 228 sibling pairs in the prospective birth cohort to reduce the influence of unmeasured residual confounding.

Investigators followed up study participants at ages 5, 14, and 21 years. The researchers assessed first marijuana use and 3 psychosis-related outcomes. These outcomes included nonaffective disease, hallucinations, and the Peters et al delusions inventory score.

Table. Odds Ratio of Psychosis-Related Outcomes With Marijuana Use

Marijuana Use Nonaffective Psychosis Hallucinations Peters Delusion Inventory
Never 1 (reference) 1 (reference) 1 (reference)
≤3 years 1.5 1.4 1.6
4-5 years 1.6 1.5 2.5
≥6 years 2.1 2.5 4.0



Investigators evaluated all associations between duration of marijuana use and psychosis-related outcomes using logistic regression adjusted for sex, age, parental mental illness, and hallucinations at the 14-year follow-up.

The results mirror those of another study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry (2009;166:1251–1257). That work suggests a link between daily cannabis or tobacco use and early-onset psychosis.

In that study, investigators looked at 109 patients in a psychiatric unit and found that daily marijuana and tobacco use was common. More than 40% of patients used one or both substances.

Of those who abused cannabis, almost 88% were classified as weekly or daily users before the onset of psychosis.

Escalating Marijuana Use Hastened Psychosis

It is not clear why escalating marijuana use may hasten psychosis, lead investigator Michael Compton, MD, from the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, noted in November. However, studies have shown increased cannabinoid receptor density in areas of the brain and elevated levels of endogenous cannabinoids in the blood of some patients with psychosis.

This new study, Dr. McGrath points out, provides additional evidence that early cannabis use is a risk-modifying factor for psychosis-related outcomes in young adults.

Asked by Medscape Psychiatry to comment, Emma Barkus, PhD, from the University of Wollongong in New South Wales, Australia, says the findings are consistent with the substance literature, which suggests that those who are engaging in risk behaviors at the age of 14 years are more likely to persist as they get older.

"Despite the restrictions of the methodologies," she noted, "such as use of retrospective recall and the pseudoquantification of cannabis exposure, the sample size and the persistence of the findings in the face of controlling for confounding variables and analyses on subsets of participants lend strength to an area of literature which is still fraught with controversy."

Dr. Barkus says the findings add further support to the role of cannabis use in psychoses in outcomes.

This study was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia. Coauthor Dr. Rosa Alati is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Career Development Award in Population Health.

Arch Gen Psychiatry. Published online March 1, 2010.
 
17,834
6,744
Joined Mar 5, 2005
It kills brain cells, slowly though (It's quite obvious if you hear how a heavy smoker talks). Don't get me wrong though, I'm not against it or anything because I use to do it. But like with anything, if you don't smoke excessively than I don't see how you'll acquire any serious negative effects from it.
 
102
10
Joined Jan 19, 2003
Originally Posted by kdawg

Early Marijuana Use Heightens Psychosis Risk in Young Adults

Allison Gandey

March 4, 2010 (Updated with comment March 10, 2010) — Experimenting with marijuana at a young age increases the risk for hallucinations or delusions later in life, a new study shows.

"Early cannabis use increases the risk of psychosis in young adults," lead investigator John McGrath, MD, from the Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research in Brisbane, Australia, told Medscape Psychiatry.

"Apart from having an increased risk of having a disorder like schizophrenia, the longer the young adults reported since their first cannabis use, the more likely they were to report isolated symptoms of psychosis."

Cannabis is a risk factor for psychosis, and we need to let the general community know about these risks.

Psychotic disorders are common and typically affect 1 or 2 people of every 100. "Despite our best efforts with treatment, not everyone makes a full recovery," Dr. McGrath said. "We need to think about prevention. Cannabis is a risk factor for psychosis, and we need to let the general community know about these risks."

Dr. McGrath says he was surprised that the results were so strong and so consistent.

The study was published online March 1 in Archives of General Psychiatry.

Investigators studied 3800 young adults born at an Australian hospital taking part in the Mater-University Study of Pregnancy.

Prospective studies have already identified an association between marijuana use and later psychosis-related outcomes, but concerns remain about unmeasured confounding variables.

Dr. McGrath and his team focused instead on 228 sibling pairs in the prospective birth cohort to reduce the influence of unmeasured residual confounding.

Investigators followed up study participants at ages 5, 14, and 21 years. The researchers assessed first marijuana use and 3 psychosis-related outcomes. These outcomes included nonaffective disease, hallucinations, and the Peters et al delusions inventory score.

Table. Odds Ratio of Psychosis-Related Outcomes With Marijuana Use

Marijuana Use Nonaffective Psychosis Hallucinations Peters Delusion Inventory
Never 1 (reference) 1 (reference) 1 (reference)
≤3 years 1.5 1.4 1.6
4-5 years 1.6 1.5 2.5
≥6 years 2.1 2.5 4.0



Investigators evaluated all associations between duration of marijuana use and psychosis-related outcomes using logistic regression adjusted for sex, age, parental mental illness, and hallucinations at the 14-year follow-up.

The results mirror those of another study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry (2009;166:1251–1257). That work suggests a link between daily cannabis or tobacco use and early-onset psychosis.

In that study, investigators looked at 109 patients in a psychiatric unit and found that daily marijuana and tobacco use was common. More than 40% of patients used one or both substances.

Of those who abused cannabis, almost 88% were classified as weekly or daily users before the onset of psychosis.

Escalating Marijuana Use Hastened Psychosis

It is not clear why escalating marijuana use may hasten psychosis, lead investigator Michael Compton, MD, from the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, noted in November. However, studies have shown increased cannabinoid receptor density in areas of the brain and elevated levels of endogenous cannabinoids in the blood of some patients with psychosis.

This new study, Dr. McGrath points out, provides additional evidence that early cannabis use is a risk-modifying factor for psychosis-related outcomes in young adults.

Asked by Medscape Psychiatry to comment, Emma Barkus, PhD, from the University of Wollongong in New South Wales, Australia, says the findings are consistent with the substance literature, which suggests that those who are engaging in risk behaviors at the age of 14 years are more likely to persist as they get older.

"Despite the restrictions of the methodologies," she noted, "such as use of retrospective recall and the pseudoquantification of cannabis exposure, the sample size and the persistence of the findings in the face of controlling for confounding variables and analyses on subsets of participants lend strength to an area of literature which is still fraught with controversy."

Dr. Barkus says the findings add further support to the role of cannabis use in psychoses in outcomes.

This study was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia. Coauthor Dr. Rosa Alati is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Career Development Award in Population Health.

Arch Gen Psychiatry. Published online March 1, 2010.

Look at how the study is conducted.  Not a double-blind test or anything; just taking a random sampling (or at least that's what I'm getting out of it right now).  This correlation might be explained by the possibility that individuals prone to psychosis are more likely to smoke habitually.  Not saying this is the case but it's plausible.  Correlation does not equal causation.
 
5,416
12
Joined Jan 23, 2005


This isn't a topic I know anything about, but I find it kind of funny that you requested information in an attempt to "educate yourself," then simply dismissed the information as soon as you read it.
 
12,706
71
Joined Apr 14, 2004
Originally Posted by JDocs

Originally Posted by AizenSousuke

Originally Posted by CWrite78

less money in my pocket
this is exactly what i came in here to type
i understand its all good if its not something you do often

but in my case... i blow a nice amount of $ on it a year that could've gone to a better use, but i say ehh @*$+ it
This and inhaling smoke into your lungs CANNOT be good for you or even have no effect, so something is definitely going on in there. Even if it's just weaker lung capacity. With the money thing though, I barely go out/drink so I guess it's just a substitute ? I dunno, I DON'T NEED TO EXPLAIN MYSELF TO YOU!
what about vaporizing?
 
7,138
1,149
Joined Aug 23, 2003
Originally Posted by AC4Three


This isn't a topic I know anything about, but I find it kind of funny that you requested information in an attempt to "educate yourself," then simply dismissed the information as soon as you read it.
 true but i mean look at it, its so obvious that that info isn't really backed by non-biased scientific research. I was looking for actual studies. Or claims from people that have suffered.
Claiming that marijuana is linked with crime is absurd. 
 
572
10
Joined Apr 18, 2006
I've spent hours sifting through studies on the web, and there are only a few conclusively defined detriments to marijuana use:

1) It's smoking. Unless you are using a vape, you are a still inhaling carcinogens, though the risk of contracting disease is lower than that associated with tobacco use.

2) Weed can negatively impact your short-term memory. I've experienced this firsthand. It's kind of like an overall mental haziness that makes recalling recent information slightly more difficult. This does not seem to happen to everyone, however. I have friends that smoke the day before Orgo exams to ensure good, anxiety-free sleep. They report favorable results.

3) It can have some hindrance on your cognitive abilities (albeit slight). These effects can last a maximum of thirty days, given very heavy smoking. Beyond thirty days, marijuana produces no lingering cognitive impediments. Also, studies show that people with lower IQs are much more affected cognitively than those with higher IQs.

4) It's illegal (in most states).
 
3,511
418
Joined Oct 9, 2007
its %*+!*@% crazy how the world works.

ALCOHOL is a drug.

and would be the # 1 "gateway" drug

alxcohol alters your state of mind, actions, etc just like other drugs who alter your mind in different way.

i only drink but its ridiculously stupid with this marijuana gateway drug nonsense.
 
Top Bottom
  AdBlock Detected

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks some useful and important features of our website. For the best possible site experience please take a moment to disable your AdBlocker or head over to our upgrade page to donate for an ad-free experience Upgrade now