Dummy politicians PASSED congestion pricing in NYC!?

Discussion in 'General' started by ninjahood, Feb 28, 2019.

  1. alchemist iq

    alchemist iq

    24,124
    23,129
    Joined
    May 13, 2008
    My brother in law is a architect, when the mta wanted to improve their wireless infrastructure he had a contract with them...he milked them like crazy that he brought a second house off it.
     
    neverflopped likes this.
  2. diego

    diego

    13,205
    5,515
    Joined
    Jun 5, 2008
    That’s dope. Caring issues that only affect you personally...
     
  3. brendasdeadbaby

    brendasdeadbaby

    20,115
    6,008
    Joined
    Jul 22, 2012
    Upper west side and midtown?? only rich pricks chill there. I’m good.
     
  4. ninjahood

    ninjahood

    64,173
    18,679
    Joined
    Aug 2, 2004
    oh yeah? god bless folks who live in L.E.S. hells kitchen, upper west side, china town, chambers street, canal etc. cuz those folks is faaaar from rich.
     
    sharpshooter718 likes this.
  5. ninjahood

    ninjahood

    64,173
    18,679
    Joined
    Aug 2, 2004
     
  6. brendasdeadbaby

    brendasdeadbaby

    20,115
    6,008
    Joined
    Jul 22, 2012
    With the exception of l.e.s and Chinatown you need quap to live in any other neighborhood on that list.
     
  7. johnnyredstorm

    johnnyredstorm

    67,073
    12,915
    Joined
    Apr 5, 2008
    I hope we have more taxes imposed on manhattan. Should be a tourism tax passed next to de clutter midtown.
     
  8. ninjahood

    ninjahood

    64,173
    18,679
    Joined
    Aug 2, 2004
    Residents in congestion-pricing zones are fuming over new taxes
    By Nolan Hicks, Sarah Trefethen and Aaron Feis

    April 1, 2019 | 10:11pm


    [​IMG]
    Shutterstock

    Motorists living inside Manhattan’s new congestion-pricing zonecould get socked with the same fee as any other driver — even if they never leave the zone, officials said Monday.

    Robert Mujica, the state budget director, said it would be up to a Traffic Review Mobility Board to “come up with a structure for how you deal with intra-zone moves. Is there a charge — any charge — or what the charge would be for intra-zone traffic?”

    The six-person panel, which will be appointed by MTA Bridges and Tunnels, with just one member recommended by Mayor de Blasio, will deal with all pricing issues.

    [​IMG]
    –– ADVERTISEMENT ––





    Mujica defended the potential plan to charge sub-61st Street residents for driving around their own neighborhoods as a matter of fairness to outside commuters.



    “What you don’t want to say is the only people that are allowed to drive around in the zone are people who live in Manhattan,” Mujica said.

    “The Central Business District happens to be the most transit-friendly area,” he added. “You have the most transit options there, so you should be driving less. That’s the goal.”

    But fed-up Gothamites blasted the fee — estimated in the $11.50 range for cars — as a brazen ripoff.

    “It’s totally unfair to people who live here,” fumed Marlene Baum. “We’re paying taxes that are extraordinarily high already.”

    The 69-year-old Gramercy resident predicted that stubborn New Yorkers would stay behind the wheel — though some of them could be forced to put the five boroughs in their rearview mirrors.

    Advertisement
    “I do think they’re going to drive people out. They’re already doing it with the taxes,” said Baum. “People are going to move to Florida.”

    The roughly $1 billion that congestion pricing is projected to raise each year will be placed into a “lockbox” earmarked for upgrades and repairs to the flagging mass-transit system, though some city residents objected to the MTA being rebuilt on motorists’ dime.

    West Village resident Marjorie ReitmanNatan Dvir
    “The city’s trying to raise money to fix the subways and penalizing everyone,” groused West 12th Street resident Marjorie Reitman, 74. “No consideration has been given to the residents. It’s ridiculous.”

    Along the zone’s 61st Street border, locals and businesses alike were already bracing for the impact, even as it’s more than 18 months down the road.

    Advertisement
    “It doesn’t make any sense for me to have to pay $11 to cross a block,” said Diana Blaney, an East 56th Street resident who now plans to start parking her car north of the zone and then hoofing it.

    “I’m lucky that I live on the line so I can make adjustments.”

    Not so lucky are the owners of parking garages within the zone, who fear they’ll have to lower their prices to entice customers to cross the line — or lose business.

    “It’ll definitely have a toll on this garage,” said Jean Palic, an attendant at City Parking on East 59th Street. “We’ll probably lose a lot of customers.”

    Workers at the Coliseum Park garage on West 58th Street also shared that fear.

    Advertisement
    “Oh, God, forget about it,” groaned worker Basil Dyal. “This garage won’t do business anymore if people have to pay that.”

    There are some positives New Yorkers trapped in the zone can cling to, however.

    First, zone residents who make $60,000 or less annually can claim a credit for the fees on their tax returns.

    Second? “You’re not going to charge someone who’s moving their car because it’s alternate side of the street parking,” said Mujica.

    Additional reporting by Ruth Weissmann and Julia Marsh

    https://nypost.com/2019/04/01/residents-in-congestion-pricing-zones-are-fuming-over-new-taxes/
     
  9. neverflopped

    neverflopped

    4,508
    691
    Joined
    Jun 19, 2005
    There should be and exemption or at least price reduction for Manhattan residents in the zone just like Staten islanders pay a reduced toll for the Verrazano
     
  10. squatchnt

    squatchnt

    10,425
    4,690
    Joined
    Jul 21, 2012
    A monthly parking spot in a midtown Manhattan garage is more than rent for a 1 bedroom in some places :lol:
     
  11. ninjahood

    ninjahood

    64,173
    18,679
    Joined
    Aug 2, 2004
    HA! these dummies is thinking about tolling drivers who already live in within da congestion zone to drive around their own neighborhood :lol: :smh:

    imagine owning a car below 61th street, and you wake up every day being tolled 12-15 bucks cuz you just happen to live there.

    elections gonna be a blood bath.
     
  12. ninjahood

    ninjahood

    64,173
    18,679
    Joined
    Aug 2, 2004
    whoever got a garage close to da FDR/west side highway gonna EAT cuz those roads are exempt, and if you can drove right into a parking lot, you won't incur a toll= instant cottage industry.
     
  13. beh235

    beh235

    34,134
    7,411
    Joined
    Jul 30, 2005
    I hate Manhattan anyway, all more reason not to go
     
  14. johnnyredstorm

    johnnyredstorm

    67,073
    12,915
    Joined
    Apr 5, 2008
    You a fool if you driving to manhattan
     
    ninjatoes and fluid hips like this.
  15. icysoles718

    icysoles718

    1,525
    778
    Joined
    Apr 17, 2006
    Interesting to see how the exemptions and pricing in general will be. Dying to see where the money will go also, since the funds will be funneled through the state. Hope you get the lions share for improvements for NYC infrastructure. This is a mess man
     
  16. millenial

    millenial

    6,310
    1,545
    Joined
    Jan 22, 2015
    Even LES and Chinatown is expensive now

     
  17. ninjahood

    ninjahood

    64,173
    18,679
    Joined
    Aug 2, 2004
    i LIVE in Manhattan, and people who own cars will incinerate law makers who passed this
     
  18. ByleBuzma

    ByleBuzma

    2,867
    2,820
    Joined
    Mar 7, 2018
    :rofl:

    Talk about a horrible idea.
     
  19. neverflopped

    neverflopped

    4,508
    691
    Joined
    Jun 19, 2005
    Na sometimes it’s more convenient to drive. Even if it means paying for parking
     
  20. Nereyda Vuelve Por Dios

    Nereyda Vuelve Por Dios formerly DONRE

    1,933
    1,349
    Joined
    Jul 23, 2012
    Born and raised in the les. I had to move out quick. Rent jumped crazy even in drug ridden neighborhood. They cleaning it up but the old buildings still trash, white people dont care. They still move in.
     
  21. neverflopped

    neverflopped

    4,508
    691
    Joined
    Jun 19, 2005
    Turning 1 bedroom apartments into 3 “bedrooms” lol
     
    storm2006 likes this.
  22. ninjahood

    ninjahood

    64,173
    18,679
    Joined
    Aug 2, 2004
    Great News! Driving in New York City Is About to Become Way More Expensive

    Congestion charges may force drivers, ride-sharing, and all sorts of vehicle-related services to surge in price by 2021.

    By CLIFFORD ATIYEH
    APR 1, 2019
    [​IMG]
    Drew AngererGetty Images
    • New York's governor, Andrew Cuomo, says charging "congestion" fees to drivers who enter Manhattan below Central Park will generate $15 billion for the city's transit system.
    • The automated tolls are slated to arrive in 2021.
    • Manhattan already charges drivers some of the nation's highest tolls to enter the city across its many bridges and tunnels.
    New York City is a place where grown adults with college degrees and average salaries have roommates until they've reached their forties. Today, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo promised to make Manhattan much pricier by 2021, when the city will adopt the nation's first congestion charge tax.

    Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
    The state's budget for the fiscal year beginning April 1, 2020, will allow the city to charge drivers who enter Manhattan south of 60th Street—essentially, the entire island below Central Park—under the guise of funding the dilapidated Metropolitan Transit Authority. By December 31, 2020, the city will build electronic toll gantries with license-plate readers at every stop along the "border" at 60th Street, in what will be called the Central Business District. No exact tolls have been set, although an early proposal called for daily charges of $11.52 per car and $25.34 per truck.

    This is unprecedented in the United States but not a world first: London, England, became one of the world's first major cities to enact a congestion charge in 2003 (it's now the equivalent of $15 per car per day), while even small cities in Italy and other European countries have followed suit by charging drivers in specific downtown zones.

    Cuomo said that the congestion charge will fund the MTA subways and buses with $15 billion over an unspecified time frame and that all of the money will be dedicated to the MTA. The city will make the tolls variable—similar to the way Los Angeles changes carpool-access fees depending on traffic—and provide "exemptions and credits" as wholly decided by the MTA's six-member (unelected) Traffic Mobility Review Board.

    Needless to say, all those fun car-centric apps that make New York City living so convenient such as GrubHub, Seamless, Uber, and Lyft can be expected to ramp up in price.

    At the moment, no study is estimating just how many fewer vehicles will pour into Manhattan, but then, it appears Cuomo's goal is raising cash, not lowering emissions. Needless to say, all those fun car-centric apps that make New York City living so convenient such as GrubHub, Seamless, Uber, and Lyft can be expected to ramp up in price. Package deliveries, taxis, parking, groceries: essentially everything in the city that requires four wheels to transport it is potentially affected.

    New York City already has the equivalent of multiple congestion charges just to get into the city. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey charge $15 for cars to enter New York via the George Washington Bridge and the Holland and Lincoln tunnels.

    The MTA just hiked the one-way rate on the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge from Brooklyn to Staten Island. At $19, it's now the most expensive crossing in the country. The MTA also charges $9.50 both ways between Queens and the Bronx via the Whitestone, Throgs Neck, and RFK bridges. It charges as much to drive between Brooklyn and Battery Park via the Hugh L. Carey tunnel and from Long Island City to 42nd Street through the Queens Midtown tunnel.

    Meanwhile, a one-way subway or bus fare is just $2.75. In February, the MTA approved increases for seven- and 30-day ride passes to $33 and $127, respectively, but voted against single-ride increases. Ask any New Yorker how well the trains work or how great the roads are with current funds, and they'll wonder what improvements they'd actually see with all this new money.

    It's probably for the best that Car and Driver moved out of New York a long time ago.

    https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a27009218/new-york-city-cars-congestion-pricing/
     
  23. fluid hips

    fluid hips

    2,956
    2,217
    Joined
    May 27, 2017
    NYC is pricing a lot of people out.
     
  24. johnnyredstorm

    johnnyredstorm

    67,073
    12,915
    Joined
    Apr 5, 2008
    Good. Weak aren’t needed. Live in the Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens if you can’t afford it. Y’all dont see me *****ing I can’t afford to live in the Hamptons or Beverly Hills.