***Official Political Discussion Thread***

10,844
7,811
Joined Oct 14, 2008
interesting, is this a private school thing maybe?




is a senior political columnist at the NY Times is a "random person"?
I’m on the board of a private school I attended from 1-8 grade and things were functioning as normal last year and this year minus the masks obviously which the school requires at all times.

So I can’t speak for all schools. I know my private HS is being run the same and it’s 100% all in person this year. Last year was a hybrid system.
 

Mark Antony

Supporter
55,296
73,240
Joined Apr 30, 2010
Or you could, you know, not lie. Either way it's probably best for him to plead the 5th.
Passed by the tv and this dude was on crying about political witch hunt. I don't understand these dudes who want to do these big political things and never face political backlash, so weird. It's like the dudes here on NT that loudly and proudly say stupid things but act surprised and start decrying bullying or some **** like that if anyone responds.
 

kdawg

Staff member
8,036
7,214
Joined Jun 25, 2003
Passed by the tv and this dude was on crying about political witch hunt. I don't understand these dudes who want to do these big political things and never face political backlash, so weird. It's like the dudes here on NT that loudly and proudly say stupid things but act surprised and start decrying bullying or some **** like that if anyone responds.
I think I’ve said in here before that I’m not sure that you can can complain that something is a witch hunt when at every turn they find an actual witch.
 
18,712
6,771
Joined Jul 29, 2001


More Good News
Reminds me of when, after the Northridge quake, the contractor said it would take a couple years to rebuild the chunk of freeway that collapsed (can't remember which one, but it would have crippled LA). Some wealthy dude in Los Angeles offered, like, $100,000 per month for every month under their estimated timeline. It was magically completed within a few months. Weird.
 
1,812
5,363
Joined Jul 15, 2018
Reminds me of when, after the Northridge quake, the contractor said it would take a couple years to rebuild the chunk of freeway that collapsed (can't remember which one, but it would have crippled LA). Some wealthy dude in Los Angeles offered, like, $100,000 per month for every month under their estimated timeline. It was magically completed within a few months. Weird.
Exactly!

Biden needs to work on his messaging. They need to say “Biden saved Christmas!” And photoshop him with a beard and a red suit. Really just bogart the whole conservative Christmas talking point. This was definitely a greed for the sake of greed situation and I am glad the government actually did its job fixing this.
 
11,346
27,458
Joined Jan 16, 2011

In order for democracy to work, competing parties must accept that they can lose elections, and that it’s okay. But when partisans see their political opposition not just as the opposition, but as a genuine threat to the well-being of the nation, support for democratic norms fades because “winning” becomes everything. Politics, in turn, collapses into an all-out war of “us against them,” a kind of “pernicious polarization” that appears over and over again in democratic collapses, and bears a striking similarity to what’s currently happening in the U.S.

There’s no shortage of plausible explanations for why U.S. politics has become so polarized, but many of these theories describe impossible-to-reverse trends that have played out across developed democracies, like the rise of social media and the increased political salience of globalization, immigration and urban-rural cultural divides. All of these trends are important contributors, for sure. But if they alone are driving illiberalism and hyper-partisanship in the U.S., then the problem should be consistent across all western democracies. But it isn’t.
The quote below is about one of the four characteristics that make the polarization of our political environment different from what's observable in other democracies:
Third, more so than in other countries, Americans report feeling isolated from their own party. When asked to identify both themselves and their favored party on an 11-point scale in a 2012 survey, Americans identified themselves as, on average, 1.3 units away from the party that comes closest to espousing their beliefs, according to an analysis from political scientist Jonathan Rodden. This gap is the highest difference Rodden found among respondents in comparable democracies. This isolation matters, too, because it means that parties can’t count on enthusiasm from their own voters — instead, they must demonize the political opposition in order to mobilize voters.
and

Fourth, and perhaps most significant, in the U.S., one party has become a major illiberal outlier: The Republican Party. Scholars at the V-Dem Institute at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden have been monitoring and evaluating political parties around the world. And one big area of study for them is liberalism and illiberalism, or a party’s commitment (or lack thereof) to democratic norms prior to elections. And as the chart below shows, of conservative, right-leaning parties across the globe, the Republican Party has more in common with the dangerously authoritarian parties in Hungary and Turkey than it does with conservative parties in the U.K. or Germany.
(we already knew that)

Finally,

In fact, in a new book, “American Affective Polarization in Comparative Perspective,” another team of scholars, Noam Gidron, James Adams and Will Horne, shows that citizens in majoritarian democracies with less proportional representation dislike both their own parties and opposing parties more than citizens in multiparty democracies with more proportional representation.

This pattern may have something to do with the shifting politics of coalition formation in proportional democracies, where few political enemies are ever permanent
(e.g., the unlikely new governing coalition in Israel). This also echoes something social psychologists have found in running experiments on group behavior: Breaking people into three groups instead of two leads to less animosity. Something, in other words, appears to be unique about the binary condition, or in this case, the two-party system, that triggers the kind of good-vs-evil, dark-vs-light, us-against-them thinking that is particularly pronounced in the U.S.
The question is, who can make this happen, and how? Are there even politicians who think that breaking up the Dem/Rep coalitions and introducing actual proportional representation is needed?
 
Top Bottom
  AdBlock Detected

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks some useful and important features of our website. For the best possible site experience please take a moment to disable your AdBlocker or head over to our upgrade page to donate for an ad-free experience Upgrade now